Forum Index » GEAR » The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail


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Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/13/2013 07:32:40 MDT Print View

A horse train

Brittany W
(quasarr) - F

Locale: Southeast
Time warp on the trail!! on 09/13/2013 07:52:01 MDT Print View

"It felt like I'd walked back in time."

Maybe you did???

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
"The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/13/2013 09:26:14 MDT Print View

6478
Heavy Pack-- OMG!

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster) - F

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
40 lbs of chain. on 09/13/2013 10:48:43 MDT Print View

On a backpack trip years ago, my father found an abandoned, hand-forged chain in the wilderness. He decided he had to have it. So he packed it out. Added about 40 lbs of iron in his pack on the way back. Dad's gone, but I still have that chain.

Tony Ronco
(tr-browsing) - MLife
"The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/13/2013 11:41:47 MDT Print View

Two quick stories.

Story #1:
Ages ago (mid '80s) about 12 miles south of Red's Meadow, we passed by a small, but fully equiped trail maintenance crew (including mattocks, pulaskis, macleods, grub-hoes, even a sledge & a wheel barrow!) ... I naturally assumed they were supplied by horse packers, and thought nothing more of it.
We chatted briefly about the weather (it was raining), even briefer about their work and moved on.

Three days later as we heading back into Red's Meadow, we passed the same crew, but this time they were on the move ... they were backpacking everything ... everything! UNBELIEVABLE. Our conversation this time centered their loads, which they jokingly guessimated "probably over a 100 lbs ..." Wow, trail crew studs.

Story #2:
During a backpack loop in Devil's Canyon we were on our return leg, and we passed a camp (just before the long climb out of the canyon) in which 5 college age youth had set-up a full sized, back yard type BBQ (the ones with the 5 gallon propane tank) and had a full sized ice chest. In amazement, we asked them why would they haul that set-up down from Angeles Crest Highway, did they know about any lighter alternatives? They just laughed & their answer was "well, we like to eat REALLY good!" Getting to where they were was downhill, and when we asked about the uphill return, their grinning response was "we'll do it the same way we got here, only a little slower". I certainly hope they enjoyed their meals enough to made it worth it.

Edited by tr-browsing on 09/13/2013 11:45:42 MDT.

Adam Rothermich
(aroth87) - F

Locale: Missouri Ozarks
Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/13/2013 12:20:15 MDT Print View

Granted, this was for a trail construction outing but its still the most non-lightweight thing I've carried. I was leading a backcountry trail building event, we were hiking in just two miles, camping, then hiking a little farther to the worksite. The other leader and I got there early and he carried in 5 gallons of water in a heavy duty bladder and I carried in a chainsaw and fuel on an old external pack frame. Then we hiked back out and carried our packs in with everyone else. After we were done with the chainsaw I hiked it back out to the vehicle then walked back to camp. On the way back out the next day I carried about 20 pounds of trash we'd cleaned up from the fire rings and campsite balanced precariously on top of my pack. I was really glad I packed light for that trip.
I've got lots of fun trail building/maintenance stories. I used a leaf blower on 9 miles of trail once too.

Edit: This thread needs more photos!

OTA Backcountry-1050627


Adam

Edited by aroth87 on 09/13/2013 12:25:24 MDT.

Brian Hall
(brian2o0o) - F
kayaking trip on 09/13/2013 18:35:24 MDT Print View

Not really backpacking, but backpacking at the same time. I was on a whitewater kayaking trip with a friend when we saw a group of four guys all in small six foot whitewater playboats, wearing 80liter packs while they paddled. Never saw any of them flip in the short time that we saw them, but when they did I'm sure they went straight to the bottom. They obviously didn't think that one through, didn't have any spray skirts either...

Sam G
(Sarugo) - F
Keg on 09/13/2013 19:50:25 MDT Print View

Saw a guy carrying a quarter barrel keg with a nitrous-tank tap up to Conundrum Hot Springs a month ago.
9 miles up-hill one way and he got a standing ovation as he arrived at the hot springs.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/13/2013 21:11:17 MDT Print View

I read on another forum that some folks carried a canoe up to Lake of the Clouds in the Presidentials to float around haha seems like a lot of work for a very small pond

Thomas Conly
(conly) - F - M

Locale: Lots of canoeing and snow
rocks on 09/15/2013 11:36:12 MDT Print View

I went on a canoe trip with a buddy a few years ago. I'd been lightweight backpacking exclusively for a few summers and was amazed by the huge load that the other guys brought. I complained about one guy's stuff a lot because I ended up carrying it a couple times over portages. When I finally asked what he had in there, his response was- rocks. He wanted to carve rocks and he brought a big bag worth and all the metal files to go with it.

Also, in the hundred mile wilderness i found the following pile of stuff. I thought someone else was camping at that site that night and had probably just gone to get water down the hill. When no one showed up for quite a while I took a closer look at all the stuff and realized it was all superfluous items. Someone had hauled it all in, decided it was too heavy and left it.stuff

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - F

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Wrought Iron Loveseat, and a HUGE beefsteak on 09/15/2013 18:26:27 MDT Print View

There's a heavy, high-quality wrought iron loveseat on the top of Picketpost Mountain (outside of Phoenix, AZ). But what's really amazing is that the "trail" involves much rock scrambling and a 10-foot high boulder that must be climbed. How they did that with the loveseat is beyond my imagination, but I enjoyed a nice rest on it at the top!

On the way to John's Brook Lodge in the Adirondacks, we encountered a young man carrying an enormous beefsteak (enough to feed 20-25 people) in a plastic milk crate strapped to his load-hauler external frame pack. (There was more food in his pack.)

Where are those pack goats when you need them?

Edit: Yes, of course it was a JBL staff member -- I didn't think they were excluded from the theme of the thread...it still looked mighty funny!

Edited by Wildtowner on 09/16/2013 11:52:32 MDT.

Stephen Komae
(skomae) - MLife

Locale: northeastern US
Re: Wrought Iron Loveseat, and a HUGE beefsteak on 09/15/2013 18:52:45 MDT Print View

> On the way to John's Brook Lodge in the Adirondacks, we encountered a young man carrying an enormous beefsteak (enough to feed 20-25 people) in a plastic milk crate strapped to his load-hauler external frame pack. (There was more food in his pack.)

Are you sure it wasn't one of the JBL staff? They pack in all of their supplies.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/15/2013 19:44:25 MDT Print View

My wife and I came upon a guy about 10 miles into the Pasayten Wilderness of Washington State about 15 years ago. He was sitting a little off the trail and had a couple large suitcases and a large trunk (about 2' x 2' x 3'). He was big and a bit weird.

I carried a gun for a few years after that whenever I hiked with my wife in that area.

Dena Kelley
(EagleRiverDee) - M

Locale: Eagle River, Alaska
"The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/16/2013 11:47:06 MDT Print View

Last year on a Meetup overnighter I was attending, a gal showed up with one of the most distressing conflicts between UL and BPH that I've ever seen.

Her pack was a lightweight external frame. Her tent was a boy scout pup tent (quite light). She didn't pack a sleeping bag, brought a military poncho liner instead. (That actually was a mistake, she would have frozen that night).

However- she had 3 GALLONS of water with her. One gallon in her pack, and one gallon jug to carry in each hand. Our hike was along a creek nearly the entire way, and we were camping at a lake. I was only able to get her to agree to ditch one gallon. She only needed to carry a liter, tops.

Her food was all canned. And she had quite a few cans.

And she had a bunch of cotton clothes- cotton hoodie, etc. Her pack probably weighed somewhere around 60 lbs. For an overnighter.

Fortunately, she decided to bail on us shortly up the trail because the pack was quite uncomfortable. I wasn't the organizer for that Meetup, but after that experience I also include a sample packing list in all my Meetups.

Lou Z
(lugee)

Locale: Southern California
ice chest and wood handled axe. on 09/17/2013 16:11:33 MDT Print View

I once saw a couple hiking in with a 130 quart ice chest. They were maybe 2 miles in from the trail. another time I saw someone carrying a huge wooden handled axe.

HK Newman
(hknewman) - MLife

Locale: Earth (mostly)
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/17/2013 16:20:04 MDT Print View

One of those standing grills (the metal circular ones) and lawn chairs to basecamp at Highland Mary Lakes in Colorado's Weminuche (the Northwest side). They would just spend all day and night catching trout at one area with angler set ups.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/14/2013 20:20:08 MDT Print View

A few years ago I saw an unattended heavy hauler pack with a 50 lb bag of dog food strapped to it. Later I saw the owner hiking with it, accompanied by a rather huge St Bernard.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim)

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/14/2013 20:30:19 MDT Print View

About a week ago in the San Jacinto Mountains:


That gallon of water hanging off the back can't be helping things.

His buddy didn't even have a backpack, just a duffel bag. He forced his arms through the handles to make a sort of backpack.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/14/2013 23:11:08 MDT Print View

lease lightweight thing I did...

When I was a lad in boy scouts we would carry a 18lb cast iron dutch oven. After all that work, the fruit cobbler always tasted good :)

as to what I have seen... it's tied

#1 my cousin who work for the forestry service years ago. Typical heavy-weight backpacking style gear and food for 5 days + double bit axe, saw, and a chain saw with gas. My memory was that when he hit the trailhead the gear was 110-120lb.

#2 a couple of years ago on the lost coast. 60 gallon cooler that seemed to be filled with a funny harness to carry on the back, a surf board on the shoulder, and a large bag (I am guessing clothing) slug over his side

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/15/2013 06:28:16 MDT Print View

"#2 a couple of years ago on the lost coast. 60 gallon cooler that seemed to be filled with a funny harness to carry on the back, a surf board on the shoulder, and a large bag (I am guessing clothing) slug over his side"

The cooler must be a favorite method for someone there. I've come across a cooler twice out there. Once it was filled with wool blankets and clothes.