The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail
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Phillip Asby
(PGAsby) - M

Locale: North Carolina
The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 08:29:33 MDT Print View

I mentioned this on another thread but it occurred to me this might be a fun thread on it's own. What is the most extreme/interesting/amusing example of "non lightweight" backpacking you've witnessed (or perhaps done yourself)?

My experience is limited almost solely to Scout outings - so as you can imagine there are plenty of 85L packs with stuff hanging off them that perform almost like clown cars - I can't imagine how they fit that much stuff into even that big a pack.

I will say that several guys commitment to food is admirable - and I suppose if you split this 4 ways.... well maybe not. 4 guys packed in a 5 lb bag of Kingsford charcoal; a stansport heavy duty camp grill; 4 frozen NY strips; 4 large baked potatoes; a big tupperware bowl of salad (dressed); and a tupperware full of brownies. These weren't newbies either. It was impressive and the hike in was only about 2.5 miles, but still. The next morning they had a stainless steel 8 cup percolator to make coffee. And a fry pan - like the Coleman 9" fry pan not a top to an anodized pot. And half a dozen eggs which they used to make breakfast burritos. Weight aside I can't figure out how they hauled it all in since at least two of them were hauling in two man tents for themselves plus some troop gear (a couple big tarps, etc...). Like I said their packs were like a clown car - more and more big heavy stuff just kept coming.

At a base pack weight of about 19 pounds I am far and away the lightest person out there - my son is close behind me actually. There are a handful of scouts who lean towards light as well but I have a good bit of evangelizing to do and I'm far from UL and not in the same state as SUL guys here.

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 08:37:05 MDT Print View

Big cast iron frying pan.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 08:39:30 MDT Print View

"Big cast iron frying pan."

Man, you got to have some muscles just to use that stuff at home, let alone backpacking.. :O

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 08:43:12 MDT Print View

Seriously. When you see teenagers walking into camp looking like arthritic octogenarians, somethin' ain't right.

Edited by T.L. on 09/12/2013 08:43:50 MDT.

J R
(JRinGeorgia) - F
lotsa water on 09/12/2013 08:50:10 MDT Print View

A gallon jug full of water, swinging off the bottom of a super-sized pack, through an area with a stream or spring every few hundred yards.

Benjamin Meadors
(thebentern) - F

Locale: Central Arkansas
Firewood on 09/12/2013 09:04:14 MDT Print View

A buddy of mine carried some seasoned firewood in a sack strapped to his already 40+ lb loaded external frame pack on one of our treks. Needless to say, he never did this again. In case you're wondering, I did tell him that this was a terrible idea.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 09:14:45 MDT Print View

A big cast iron cauldron, enough to feed 10, with an entire watermelon nested inside.

Richard Cullip
(RichardCullip) - M

Locale: San Diego County
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 09:26:57 MDT Print View

Last year I saw a group at 11,000ft in the High Sierra with a 5L mini keg of beer.

J H L
(jake.L) - F

Locale: Katahdin
Only The Essentials on 09/12/2013 09:42:37 MDT Print View

I've witnessed a full keg of domestic (15.5 gallons) with pump tap. Granted it was being pulled on a sled and its only 2.4 miles and 1,843' elevation to Hermit Lake on Mt Washington, NH.

Edited by jake.L on 09/12/2013 09:56:35 MDT.

Phillip Asby
(PGAsby) - M

Locale: North Carolina
social beverages on 09/12/2013 09:49:49 MDT Print View

I admire those committed to a social beverage - I guess I'm lucky that I am happy with and arguably prefer a bit of scotch and water or bourbon and water. Lighter and more bang for the grams so to speak.

G H
(NotLight) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: most not lightweight thing on the trail on 09/12/2013 10:00:58 MDT Print View

The most ridiculous overweight thing I've seen on the trail is myself :(

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 10:14:51 MDT Print View

A sack of raw potatoes attached to the back of a pack.

Aaron Oxenrider
(theox26) - M

Locale: South Central PA
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 10:21:04 MDT Print View

Scouts are always the best for these. One kid brought canned soup for his meals for a 50 mile week on the AT.

While not weight wise, my favorite story is a kid who brought hot pockets for his meal the first night. It just never occurred to him that he had no way to keep it frozen or cook it properly. We helped him clean a rock and use that to bake it in the fire but he got ribbed pretty hard for it.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 10:28:39 MDT Print View

A 36-inch chainsaw in Desolation Wilderness.

Skis (this was at Point Reyes on the beach, 6 miles from the trailhead). As were:

A basketball backboard (only one, for a half-court game).

An 8-inch reflecting telescope.

A MSR-fired hot tub.

Bradley Attaway
(AttaboyBrad) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
A broadsword. on 09/12/2013 10:35:47 MDT Print View

Over several trips with college friends, iterations of "That's not a knife, THIS is a knife!" really got out of hand.

Edited by AttaboyBrad on 09/12/2013 10:37:53 MDT.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
New SLR camera & big lens on 09/12/2013 11:19:15 MDT Print View

My friend took his brand new SLR camera AND telephoto lens on a 5 day trip down Coyote Gulch. I warned him not to take it but he insisted.

Yeah he got great photos... but he sweared bullets carrying it and admitted it was a mistake.

(I gotta 'fess up. I carry an Olympus TG-1 which ain't a lightweight point-and-shoot but it's far from what my buddy Par was carrying.)

Edited by Danepacker on 09/12/2013 11:21:18 MDT.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Glass Bottles on 09/12/2013 11:30:28 MDT Print View

12 beers. What an idiot.

Oh wait, that was me...

Elliott Wolin
(ewolin) - MLife

Locale: Hampton Roads, Virginia
RE: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/12/2013 11:33:40 MDT Print View

Ok, this may not qualify since it was canoe/kayak camping. But my friend brought two dozen ears of fresh corn, onions, tomatoes, peppers, a hunk of beef for fajitas, two dozen eggs, two pounds of bacon, a bag of fresh bagels, and I forget what else. Oh, and also a cooler with ice.

I must admit it was the best food I'd every had in the backcountry!

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 11:38:10 MDT Print View

A large steamer trunk full of heavy camera gear, carried between two guys.

--B.G.--

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
food on 09/12/2013 11:48:51 MDT Print View

and you know what ...

theyre probably having a more satisfying culinary experience than those BPLers eating their dehydrated meals with olive oil swished down with their chlorinated water

there are times when its worth it to bring REAL food ...

each to his/her own

;)

Mike W
(skopeo) - F

Locale: British Columbia
The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 13:03:45 MDT Print View

>> A large steamer trunk full of heavy camera gear, carried between two guys. <<

That sounds very familiar!

I was on a week long canoe trip that involved some substantial portages, so we tried to keep our backpacks as light as possible. We were late hitting the trail on the first day and as we carried our packs and canoe down the trail we met a guy sitting in the middle of the trail on a plywood box. We stopped and chatted with him. He had custom built a plywood food locker to fit into his canoe and I suspect it weighed 100 lbs! The guy was totally beat. His friend had walked ahead with the canoe and he was dragging the box down the trail. They had actually left the trailhead 4 hours before we had started our hike! He told me we would be jealous of their meals when we saw them in camp but of course we never saw them again.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 13:16:23 MDT Print View

My hiking partner carried 15 pounds of steel reserve.

Edited by justin_baker on 09/12/2013 13:17:07 MDT.

Erik G
(fox212)

Locale: THE Bay Area :)
Propane on 09/12/2013 13:30:43 MDT Print View

I once passed a guy carrying a 20lb propane cylinder. His "backpack" was one of those beach chairs with pack straps. And he was hiking in flip flops.

David Olsen
(oware)

Locale: Steptoe Butte
Watermelon on top of Mt Rainier on 09/12/2013 13:56:42 MDT Print View

Guy carried it up to said he had done it.

I carried a Rainier beer I found in the parking lot and left it in the parking lot when I got down. Wondered if it made more than one trip to the crater.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Lobsters in Desolation Wilderness on 09/12/2013 14:18:52 MDT Print View

Pro-tip: just use water ice to keep lobsters cool. Dry ice asphyxiates them.

The UC Berkeley Outing club, CHAOS, has a long tradition of bring stupid things to various obscure places.

Jack-o-lanterns to the top of the Bay Bridge being one of the less legal such efforts.

Champagne for 30 people and a 3-tiered wedding cake on top of Half Dome being one of the more celebratory.

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 14:33:13 MDT Print View

"A MSR-fired hot tub."

I have to get me one of those!

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 14:38:36 MDT Print View

I've carried heavy fresh food and several bottle of champagne. The worst however was a full sized camping "bag" chair (the kind used by RVers) and 25 lbs of video camera equipment. All of this was for a hike of only a mile and a half, and it's downhill on the way in. The chair and camera equipment about killed me on the way up...

Hiking out of this same place I did carry an ice chest up the hill for some poor girl who's boyfriend left her on the trail by herself.

For longer hikes the worst I carried was two garcia bear cans in Yosemite.

Edited by Hitech on 09/12/2013 14:39:58 MDT.

Erik G
(fox212)

Locale: THE Bay Area :)
How about a couch? on 09/12/2013 14:55:41 MDT Print View

...for relaxing after hauling all that "non lightweight" stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQc7t2BOx_Y


:)

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 16:12:30 MDT Print View

This reminds me of a guy we met on Stewart Island and named the Axe Man. He said he was out for about three weeks and had an 80 L pack. However this was full and he was supplementing it with a canvas shopping bag in each hand. As far as I could see each bag was full of tins. He was also carrying a decent sized hatchet (unusual in NZ, as the huts often have their own axe). Just to keep things fresh he was wearing running shoes without much tread. Stewart Island is very, very muddy and when we saw him later he was making very slow and careful progress down hill.

Eric has been posting a lot lately. So just to save him the effort here I will say that he seemed very happy and he was going to be out there long after we had returned back home.

michael adamski
(mikeadamski) - M
A TV! on 09/12/2013 16:49:31 MDT Print View

Granted, it was gutted. Then a paper scroll was inserted to teach a troop of scouts a "Leave No Trace" lesson. Hike in was only 2 miles.

Mr. Z shows how not to pack

Barry Cuthbert
(nzbazza) - MLife

Locale: New Zealand
I'll see your couch and raise you a BBQ... Summit party on Mt Taranaki on 09/12/2013 17:12:29 MDT Print View

http://www.stuff.co.nz/oddstuff/4553740/Climbing-companions-take-barbecuing-to-new-heights

Back in the early 90's I belonged to a university camping trip and the club was responsible for maintaining a couple of tramping huts in the Tararuas (New Zealand). Normally the supplies would be dropped off by helicopter but being students we didn't have the cash for that so we humped it in. A trip that normally was 3 hours took 6. I carried a 40kg bag of cement for mixing into concrete for the hut's foundations. At least my load was small in volume so it didn't get caught on the trees, my mate had to carry the buckets, shovels, and a couple of sheets of corrugated roofing iron.

Brittany W
(quasarr) - F

Locale: Southeast
Adult beverages!! on 09/12/2013 17:29:39 MDT Print View

LOL I love this thread!! Need more pics tho :)

How about an entire box of wine! What an idiot! Oh wait that was me......

Also in 2005 doing trail work in CO, we had a base camp about 3mi (and 1,500 ft up!!) from the parking lot, and 45 min drive from Leadville. Each 10 days we had to resupply with produce, eggs, etc. Oh dear lord, it was bad! Imagine a big backpack, plus a bag of oranges, plus a grocery bag in each hand with eggs. Oh how those fit UL Colorado trail runner folks must have laughed at us!! But the good news was, if you could carry it, you could have it!! So that included luxuries like Trivial Pursuit and, no kidding, a trombone!!

PS if you have hiked the Colorado Trail or summit trail on Mt Massive, I hope you liked it!! :) :)

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
The TV !! on 09/12/2013 17:42:38 MDT Print View

The television shell is hilarious!

The heaviest-looking things I've seen are the cast-iron skillet a buddy used to carry on every trip (and he was fast) and a large dutch oven strapped to a big, blue Lowe pack. The actual heaviest item is probably the 5-man inflateable we saw guys hauling into Thousand Island Lake this summer.

I carried a Big Agnes Big House out to TI one year, because I didn't own anything that would hold 3 people and...because I could. Later, I reconsidered that position, but the tent was luxurious.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
scout stuff on 09/12/2013 20:15:01 MDT Print View

We saw a scout from another crew at a campsite in the backcountry at Philmont with 1) laptop computer 2) Sony playstation 3) Sony PSP

Okay, the PSP alone I might have understood.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 20:35:11 MDT Print View

Saw some fun things on the Long Trail last summer.

first was a family that had done 3 days to do what we did that day up to Killington. they had large frame packs with canned food, large bottles of alcohol and pretty non light camping gear. They were harmless and gave us candy and JELLO pudding cups (pudding makes great breakfast!)

2nd was a first aid kit that probably weighed 2-3lbs from a "NOLS" guy who seemed to think he was going to do surgery. He couldn't quite wrap his head around my 3oz ziplock bag of gauze, moleskin and bandaids. They also had their food packed in bulk for 3...except one had to get off the trail so they were stuck with extra. ever see a sandwich bag half full of table salt? or a gallon of oatmeal.

in Kings Canyon we saw a pair of pack Llamas but they carry themselves :)

Jake S
(spags) - M
Frying pans are small. on 09/12/2013 20:51:59 MDT Print View

I had a Spanish national scout leader once carry a 26" Paella pan 2.5 miles into our campsite. I think it weighed something like 12 pounds, but we harvested enough freshwater mussels and crayfish that afternoon to flavor and feed most of the troop out of that thing.

I was 12 at the time but still remember that meal, so I guess the impact was there. :D

Edited by spags on 09/12/2013 20:53:38 MDT.

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Steel Helmets on 09/12/2013 21:16:28 MDT Print View

On my first SUL style trip at Grayson Highlands we camped out at Thomas Knob shelter. The next morning we chatted with a couple adults from the scout troop camped next door.

One teenager camp out of his tent wearing, I kid you not, a steel army helmet from the World War II era. It was painted orange for some reason. I have no idea what the kid was thinking when he packed that.

Simon Wurster
(Einstein) - F

Locale: Big Apple
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 22:18:31 MDT Print View

I met a thru-hiker on the AT this summer from England he (Smiley? Smiles? Can't remember his trail name) who was packing a homemade... swing! He unraveled it, strung it from the rafters in the Graymoor Ballfield Shelter, and swung away. Apparently, there was a swing somewhere along the AT down south, and he enjoyed it so much he made his own from a scrap of wood and paracord. Looked a little flimsy for my bulk, but a few other hikers enjoyed it.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
heavy stuff in trail - sightings on 09/12/2013 22:44:51 MDT Print View

May have hallucinated this, or seen ghosts, but in early July 2005 was detouring around Never Summer Wilderness in Colorado by going through Rocky Mtn Nat Park. Was headed south from the Bowen/Baker trailhead to the Bowen Gulch trail, to get to Bowen Lake, a popular camping spot. Although adjacent to mountains, this section of trail was quite steamy with a lot of leafy brush, and felt more like hiking in the southlands than in northern Colorado.

A young man in a blue civil war union uniform and cap, but with no insignia, passed me coming the other way (north), and responded a little gruffly to my greeting. Behind him was a young woman in a long dress, looking pregnant, with a large trunk strapped to her front. It was heavy and large enough that she had to lean way backward to walk. She must have been incredibly strong.

After they passed by, I did a kind of doubletake, but just kept on going. After the trail turned westward and went up Bowen Gulch, it was a relief to run into a couple who I camped near overnight. They had some nice dogs and offered me fresh trout cooked in one of those big frying pans. Felt back in reality.

There is a book entitled "Lost Nation," written by a college professor in Vermont that graphically describes how women were treated in the wilderness of northern New Hampshire in the days of the Indian Stream Republic. It felt like I'd walked back in time.

Edited by scfhome on 09/12/2013 22:47:05 MDT.

Daniel Pittman
(pitsy) - M

Locale: Central Texas
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/12/2013 23:11:47 MDT Print View

Two small sacks of cement and a bundle of 8' rebar. Little Mexican dude must have been pouring a foundation for something in the Cuyamacas.

Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/13/2013 07:32:40 MDT Print View

A horse train

Brittany W
(quasarr) - F

Locale: Southeast
Time warp on the trail!! on 09/13/2013 07:52:01 MDT Print View

"It felt like I'd walked back in time."

Maybe you did???

Jay Wilkerson
(Creachen) - MLife

Locale: East Bay
"The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/13/2013 09:26:14 MDT Print View

6478
Heavy Pack-- OMG!

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
40 lbs of chain. on 09/13/2013 10:48:43 MDT Print View

On a backpack trip years ago, my father found an abandoned, hand-forged chain in the wilderness. He decided he had to have it. So he packed it out. Added about 40 lbs of iron in his pack on the way back. Dad's gone, but I still have that chain.

Tony Ronco
(tr-browsing) - MLife
"The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/13/2013 11:41:47 MDT Print View

Two quick stories.

Story #1:
Ages ago (mid '80s) about 12 miles south of Red's Meadow, we passed by a small, but fully equiped trail maintenance crew (including mattocks, pulaskis, macleods, grub-hoes, even a sledge & a wheel barrow!) ... I naturally assumed they were supplied by horse packers, and thought nothing more of it.
We chatted briefly about the weather (it was raining), even briefer about their work and moved on.

Three days later as we heading back into Red's Meadow, we passed the same crew, but this time they were on the move ... they were backpacking everything ... everything! UNBELIEVABLE. Our conversation this time centered their loads, which they jokingly guessimated "probably over a 100 lbs ..." Wow, trail crew studs.

Story #2:
During a backpack loop in Devil's Canyon we were on our return leg, and we passed a camp (just before the long climb out of the canyon) in which 5 college age youth had set-up a full sized, back yard type BBQ (the ones with the 5 gallon propane tank) and had a full sized ice chest. In amazement, we asked them why would they haul that set-up down from Angeles Crest Highway, did they know about any lighter alternatives? They just laughed & their answer was "well, we like to eat REALLY good!" Getting to where they were was downhill, and when we asked about the uphill return, their grinning response was "we'll do it the same way we got here, only a little slower". I certainly hope they enjoyed their meals enough to made it worth it.

Edited by tr-browsing on 09/13/2013 11:45:42 MDT.

Adam Rothermich
(aroth87) - F

Locale: Missouri Ozarks
Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/13/2013 12:20:15 MDT Print View

Granted, this was for a trail construction outing but its still the most non-lightweight thing I've carried. I was leading a backcountry trail building event, we were hiking in just two miles, camping, then hiking a little farther to the worksite. The other leader and I got there early and he carried in 5 gallons of water in a heavy duty bladder and I carried in a chainsaw and fuel on an old external pack frame. Then we hiked back out and carried our packs in with everyone else. After we were done with the chainsaw I hiked it back out to the vehicle then walked back to camp. On the way back out the next day I carried about 20 pounds of trash we'd cleaned up from the fire rings and campsite balanced precariously on top of my pack. I was really glad I packed light for that trip.
I've got lots of fun trail building/maintenance stories. I used a leaf blower on 9 miles of trail once too.

Edit: This thread needs more photos!

OTA Backcountry-1050627


Adam

Edited by aroth87 on 09/13/2013 12:25:24 MDT.

Brian Hall
(brian2o0o) - F
kayaking trip on 09/13/2013 18:35:24 MDT Print View

Not really backpacking, but backpacking at the same time. I was on a whitewater kayaking trip with a friend when we saw a group of four guys all in small six foot whitewater playboats, wearing 80liter packs while they paddled. Never saw any of them flip in the short time that we saw them, but when they did I'm sure they went straight to the bottom. They obviously didn't think that one through, didn't have any spray skirts either...

Sam G
(Sarugo)
Keg on 09/13/2013 19:50:25 MDT Print View

Saw a guy carrying a quarter barrel keg with a nitrous-tank tap up to Conundrum Hot Springs a month ago.
9 miles up-hill one way and he got a standing ovation as he arrived at the hot springs.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/13/2013 21:11:17 MDT Print View

I read on another forum that some folks carried a canoe up to Lake of the Clouds in the Presidentials to float around haha seems like a lot of work for a very small pond

Thomas Conly
(conly) - F - M

Locale: Lots of canoeing and snow
rocks on 09/15/2013 11:36:12 MDT Print View

I went on a canoe trip with a buddy a few years ago. I'd been lightweight backpacking exclusively for a few summers and was amazed by the huge load that the other guys brought. I complained about one guy's stuff a lot because I ended up carrying it a couple times over portages. When I finally asked what he had in there, his response was- rocks. He wanted to carve rocks and he brought a big bag worth and all the metal files to go with it.

Also, in the hundred mile wilderness i found the following pile of stuff. I thought someone else was camping at that site that night and had probably just gone to get water down the hill. When no one showed up for quite a while I took a closer look at all the stuff and realized it was all superfluous items. Someone had hauled it all in, decided it was too heavy and left it.stuff

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Wrought Iron Loveseat, and a HUGE beefsteak on 09/15/2013 18:26:27 MDT Print View

There's a heavy, high-quality wrought iron loveseat on the top of Picketpost Mountain (outside of Phoenix, AZ). But what's really amazing is that the "trail" involves much rock scrambling and a 10-foot high boulder that must be climbed. How they did that with the loveseat is beyond my imagination, but I enjoyed a nice rest on it at the top!

On the way to John's Brook Lodge in the Adirondacks, we encountered a young man carrying an enormous beefsteak (enough to feed 20-25 people) in a plastic milk crate strapped to his load-hauler external frame pack. (There was more food in his pack.)

Where are those pack goats when you need them?

Edit: Yes, of course it was a JBL staff member -- I didn't think they were excluded from the theme of the thread...it still looked mighty funny!

Edited by Wildtowner on 09/16/2013 11:52:32 MDT.

Stephen Komae
(skomae) - MLife

Locale: northeastern US
Re: Wrought Iron Loveseat, and a HUGE beefsteak on 09/15/2013 18:52:45 MDT Print View

> On the way to John's Brook Lodge in the Adirondacks, we encountered a young man carrying an enormous beefsteak (enough to feed 20-25 people) in a plastic milk crate strapped to his load-hauler external frame pack. (There was more food in his pack.)

Are you sure it wasn't one of the JBL staff? They pack in all of their supplies.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/15/2013 19:44:25 MDT Print View

My wife and I came upon a guy about 10 miles into the Pasayten Wilderness of Washington State about 15 years ago. He was sitting a little off the trail and had a couple large suitcases and a large trunk (about 2' x 2' x 3'). He was big and a bit weird.

I carried a gun for a few years after that whenever I hiked with my wife in that area.

Dena Kelley
(EagleRiverDee) - M

Locale: Eagle River, Alaska
"The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail" on 09/16/2013 11:47:06 MDT Print View

Last year on a Meetup overnighter I was attending, a gal showed up with one of the most distressing conflicts between UL and BPH that I've ever seen.

Her pack was a lightweight external frame. Her tent was a boy scout pup tent (quite light). She didn't pack a sleeping bag, brought a military poncho liner instead. (That actually was a mistake, she would have frozen that night).

However- she had 3 GALLONS of water with her. One gallon in her pack, and one gallon jug to carry in each hand. Our hike was along a creek nearly the entire way, and we were camping at a lake. I was only able to get her to agree to ditch one gallon. She only needed to carry a liter, tops.

Her food was all canned. And she had quite a few cans.

And she had a bunch of cotton clothes- cotton hoodie, etc. Her pack probably weighed somewhere around 60 lbs. For an overnighter.

Fortunately, she decided to bail on us shortly up the trail because the pack was quite uncomfortable. I wasn't the organizer for that Meetup, but after that experience I also include a sample packing list in all my Meetups.

Lou Z
(lugee) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
ice chest and wood handled axe. on 09/17/2013 16:11:33 MDT Print View

I once saw a couple hiking in with a 130 quart ice chest. They were maybe 2 miles in from the trail. another time I saw someone carrying a huge wooden handled axe.

HK Newman
(hknewman) - MLife

Locale: Western US
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 09/17/2013 16:20:04 MDT Print View

One of those standing grills (the metal circular ones) and lawn chairs to basecamp at Highland Mary Lakes in Colorado's Weminuche (the Northwest side). They would just spend all day and night catching trout at one area with angler set ups.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/14/2013 20:20:08 MDT Print View

A few years ago I saw an unattended heavy hauler pack with a 50 lb bag of dog food strapped to it. Later I saw the owner hiking with it, accompanied by a rather huge St Bernard.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/14/2013 20:30:19 MDT Print View

About a week ago in the San Jacinto Mountains:


That gallon of water hanging off the back can't be helping things.

His buddy didn't even have a backpack, just a duffel bag. He forced his arms through the handles to make a sort of backpack.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/14/2013 23:11:08 MDT Print View

lease lightweight thing I did...

When I was a lad in boy scouts we would carry a 18lb cast iron dutch oven. After all that work, the fruit cobbler always tasted good :)

as to what I have seen... it's tied

#1 my cousin who work for the forestry service years ago. Typical heavy-weight backpacking style gear and food for 5 days + double bit axe, saw, and a chain saw with gas. My memory was that when he hit the trailhead the gear was 110-120lb.

#2 a couple of years ago on the lost coast. 60 gallon cooler that seemed to be filled with a funny harness to carry on the back, a surf board on the shoulder, and a large bag (I am guessing clothing) slug over his side

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/15/2013 06:28:16 MDT Print View

"#2 a couple of years ago on the lost coast. 60 gallon cooler that seemed to be filled with a funny harness to carry on the back, a surf board on the shoulder, and a large bag (I am guessing clothing) slug over his side"

The cooler must be a favorite method for someone there. I've come across a cooler twice out there. Once it was filled with wool blankets and clothes.

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/15/2013 08:46:17 MDT Print View

> cooler must be a favorite method for someone

The guy I was talking with had ice, beer, and burgers in his cooler.

--mark

icefest From Australia
(icefest)
Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 01:47:10 MDT Print View

> A MSR-fired hot tub. (Thomas DavidinKenai)

This I gotta see, how did it work?

I've considered making one of these and I think I could make one with enough fuel for 3 hours of operation and have it weigh less than 40lb.


Now, the heaviest thing I've seen was me for an overnight hike with my Uni. Midwinter 4000 foot ascent at night for the purpose of celebration.
My pack weight was around 80lb. I had a cast iron fry pan, an ad hoc oven, 4lb flour, 3lb asparagus, 1.5lb butter, 24 eggs, 4lb of bacon and 1lb of white gas.

The following night we cooked fresh bread rolls, asparagus with sauce hollandaise, cheese fondue and meringues for dessert. With a breakfast of eggs benedict it was pure gluttony.

It took me 4 hours to walk 4 miles with a 4000 feet ascent.

.... and that's why I decided to go UL from then on.

Ryan Nakahara
(kife42) - F

Locale: Hawaii
100 on 10/16/2013 02:39:39 MDT Print View

100 pounds, 11+ gallons, containers filled with water. Straight up 1,200 ft Koko Crater.

Edited by kife42 on 10/16/2013 06:05:33 MDT.

Wim Depondt
(wim_depondt) - F - MLife

Locale: The low countries
coal & alcohol free cider on 10/16/2013 09:48:33 MDT Print View

Returned this weekend from the Cairngorms (Scotland). Upon arriving at Corrour bothy, someone showed up with five kilo of coal... but could not fire it up, even with half a dozen of fire starters. I didn't even try, having not knowledge whatsoever to start a coal fire.

At the same bothy, earlier visitors left 3 cans of alcohol free cider. I can only imagine the faces of that trekking group, after climbing passes or mountains in horrible weahter, hoping they'll have some great time at the bothy with some superb cider, followed by the desilution: "shit, we bought alcohol free booze at the petrol station. Someone in this bothy is going to die tonight"

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 14:54:35 MDT Print View

I recently read an article in New Zealand Wilderness Magazine, where the author describes seeing a tramper with a metal rubbish (garbage) can lid on the back of their pack.It's purpose was never revealed. Also described is an incident where a hut warden had to turn back a young woman pushing a shopping trolley. She had made it to the first hut on the track and was intending to take the trolley the whole way. Perhaps she had read The Road.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 15:12:13 MDT Print View

Robert: the MSR-fired hot tub was slow to heat up - it took four hours to get to 104F. 4 or 6 BP stoves only put out 30,000-50,000 BTU/ hour (about 12kW). I later went to a 250,000 BTU/hour propane burner. That got things to temperature in 40 minutes, but the added weight of the steel tank made it more suitable for snow camping with a sled or for car camping. I'll see if I have any photos that meet BPL guidelines, which I believe preclude naked college students.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 15:42:23 MDT Print View

Yeah, cast iron, coolers, boom boxes, external frame packs loaded 2' over the bearer's head with God-only-knows-what stashed inside. A classic scene is an overweight good ol' boy with a monster load, accompanied by a female companion carrying a lightly loaded day pack. Chivalry indeed! Maybe she had the life insurance on him paid up :)

The last time we were out at Olympic beaches I saw a guy walking up in the wooded section of the trail with a massive military/tactical style pack that was easily three times what I had hauled in. It just towered over him. It may have been the same bunch, but someone had hauled a huge squad tent out there, like a big green canvas cabin. It is only 3 miles from the Lake Ozette parking lot to Cape Alava and nearly flat, but geeze!

I very much remember the Eagle Scout who went on my first overnight hike with our troop who had all the light spendy gear. I had suffered up a couple miles of switchbacks in heavy boots, an old Trapper Nelson wood and canvas backpack filled with an old army surplus air mattress and a flannel lined sleeping bag. He dined on steak while we nearly poisoned ourselves trying to cook chicken in the coals of our roaring bonfire, with a choice of burned to s crisp or nearly raw. I had a *steel* surplus mess. D-cell flashlight-- all the good stuff :) We must have done major damage to the surrounding forest that weekend gathering firewood.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 16:18:35 MDT Print View

I'll see if I have any photos that meet BPL guidelines, which I believe preclude naked college students.
Actually, just go ahead and post them. We'll be sure and let you know which ones are inappropriate. ;)

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 16:21:25 MDT Print View

PMs work too. ;)

bruce thibeault
(brucetbo) - M

Locale: New England
RE: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/16/2013 17:38:45 MDT Print View

Queen size folding cot, matching air mattress.

Stephen Cohen
(esteban)

Locale: Southeast U.S.
gold in them hills on 10/17/2013 21:27:19 MDT Print View

Saw a guy in NC on the AT carrying a gold panning set up. He said he was going to fund his trip from his findings. I would assume he went broke.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: The most "non lightweight" thing you've seen on the trail on 10/17/2013 21:30:58 MDT Print View

Yo Mamma!












(sorry, i've done some very rare imbibing of some alcohol [red wine], and i have very low tolerance)

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: gold in them hills on 10/21/2013 18:38:25 MDT Print View

Did someone say "gold?" Here's a nice "UL" (ahem) sluicing set up...


HJ
Adventures in Stoving