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synthetic quilt- footbox question
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Joseph Williams
(deadogdancing) - F

Locale: SW England
synthetic quilt- footbox question on 06/13/2007 08:09:43 MDT Print View

Hey guys, I was wondering if anyone could share experience on footbox requirements/contstruction for synthetic quilts. Specifically:

I'm assuming that most people just fold the foot end of the quilt in two, and sew the end, and a little of the bottom edge together. If anyone reckons there's an advantage to an actual 3d footbox, that would be interesting.

With 2d footboxes, how have you made them? How long is the foot end (i.e. how tall is the footbox when sewn)? How far up the lower edge have you sewn(i.e. how far up you feet/legs does the footbox come? What factors affected your descision?

I have small feet, but sleep on my side, so I cause a fair amount of disturbance turning all the way from one side to the other. My quilt is intended for fairly low temps. so good coverage is a priority.

Any input would help a great deal!

all the best,
Joe

Douglas Frick
(Otter) - MLife

Locale: Wyoming
Re: synthetic quilt- footbox question on 06/13/2007 12:29:34 MDT Print View

>How long is the foot end


Ray-Way Quilt: 18"
JacksRBetter Nest: 22"

>How far up the lower edge have you sewn

Ray-Way Quilt: 14"
JacksRBetter Nest: 17"

Both fit me fine (size 12 feet).

Joseph Williams
(deadogdancing) - F

Locale: SW England
in the ballpark on 06/14/2007 16:40:36 MDT Print View

thanks for the info Douglas, it's good to have something to base my guesses on...

all the best,
J.

David Wills
(willspower3) - F
Re: synthetic quilt- footbox question on 06/15/2007 22:03:57 MDT Print View

I just converted my 40* quilt to a 3D footbox because the dimensions were slightly too small for consistent draft blockage as I found out on a 16 day hike. My feet were also more cramped than i was comfy with. I ripped it open and added a 14"x30" insulated rectangle to the bottom. It is centered on the 38" bottom of the quilt with the 14" side of the rectangle. The other 14" side is not connected and ends around the upper calf. It added length and draft stopping on the sides of the quilt to the point where I can roll around and sleep on my side where I had to be still on my stomach to fend off drafts. I highly recommend the 3D footbox.

Michael Davis
(mad777) - F

Locale: South Florida
Re:Re: synthetic quilt- footbox question on 06/19/2007 20:30:49 MDT Print View

I made a double quilt for the wife and I.
with a 3D footbox and I have no regrets.
I didn't want 4 feet fighting for space
in a typical 2D footbox.

It was my very first DIY project and my first
experience with a sewing machine, ($80 @ Wally-World),
and I didn't have any problems.

Joseph Williams
(deadogdancing) - F

Locale: SW England
3d it is! on 06/20/2007 11:36:16 MDT Print View

Ok guys, you've convinced me. 3d it is. I was beginning to lean this way because of the shape of my WP/B bivvy bag anyway- a long 2d seam would not have worked well in the tight foot end of it. Thanks for your responses... here goes!

J.

John Tunnicliffe
(BenWaller)

Locale: Northern California
what about no footbox at all? on 09/19/2007 23:15:08 MDT Print View

I've been toying with the idea of building a quilt myself for a few months now and I've been wondering why most designs incorporate a sewn-in footbox at all when to me it seems reasonable that installation of some velcro hook anchors in the footbox region and fashioning a couple of straps with velcro loop ends (so the straps are entirely removable) to pull it together enough for those times when a footbox might be useful ought to suffice.

I also have been considering putting no taper into it at all, you know, just make a regular rectangular quilt that would be functional as a wrap around camp as well as serving as my primary sleep cover over a TR Prolite 4 (large).

I sleep pretty hot, don't sleep in the snow, have no experience with a quilt other than on my urbanite bed but have had it with sleeping bags altogether.

I would appreciate any comments any of you might have to my approach. by the way I intend to only put 1.8" of PolarGuard Delta in the thing so weight should not be a big deal even if it is a rectangle. but bulk might be a problem.

any suggestions any of you have will be cheerfully accepted!

ben

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: synthetic quilt- footbox question on 09/20/2007 04:11:42 MDT Print View

> If anyone reckons there's an advantage to an actual 3d footbox, that would be interesting.

Yes, there is an advantage. When you make a 2D footbox you are using up some of the end of the bag for the closure. When you make a 3D footbox, by sewing a panel across the end, you are effectively making the bag longer. Play around with a plastic bag and you will see what I mean.

Cheers