What cook system do you use for 2 people for 3-5 days?
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Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: What cook system do you use for 2 people for 3-5 days? on 09/04/2013 21:41:58 MDT Print View

Yes. BTW, are you near the Mass border? Looks like in October I will be in Johnstown, PA. I was there in March and checked out the area. It's going to be beautiful when the colors turn.

Also will be in South Brunswick, NJ and Newark, DE in October. So in between those cities I will be hiking somewhere. Still haven't nailed down the dates.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: Re: What cook system do you use for 2 people for 3-5 days? on 09/04/2013 21:55:53 MDT Print View

Everywhere in RI is near the Mass border haha.. i'm between 15mins or 45mins depending which border you want.

PA (8hr) is no where near me though or NJ or Delaware. NH would be the best

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: What cook system do you use for 2 people for 3-5 days? on 09/04/2013 22:16:01 MDT Print View

I can work it out do drive your way for a weekend. I did some hiking near Providence this summer, don't know if I was allowed to camp overnight, so I didn't ask :)

I can bring my own stove :)

Lou Z
(lugee) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
two people on 09/05/2013 09:58:33 MDT Print View

Depends on where I am going. Generally when I go with my wife we only eat one hot meal per day and can get by with an alcohol or esbit stove. 2+, I bring my jetboil sol Ti or Olicamp Kenetic Ti and a litetrail titanium pot. Winter? Whisperlite intl.

Robert Atwood
(Courtright) - F

Locale: Sierras
2 person cook system on 09/05/2013 10:54:03 MDT Print View

My wife and I use a Snowpeak canister stove, Evernew 1.9l pot with a cozy, an MLD 850ml mug and two titanium sporks. Wen the kids (5&6) come along we add two additional sporks, two titanium bowls and two titanium double wall mugs.

We have lightened the load a few ounces by only taking the MLD mug to heat water and drink tea, but neither of us like eating out of freezer bags and the bigger pot allows us to cook everything for two people in one container and is great for boiling water to wash up at night. With the kids, the bigger pot is a necessity.

Dinner and breakfast usually work something like this: Boil water in the pot, then add in food and set aside in the cozy. Boil water in the mug to make tea. When the tea is done and cooled enough to drink, the food is usually ready to eat.

Edited by Courtright on 09/05/2013 10:56:12 MDT.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
individuals on 09/05/2013 12:35:14 MDT Print View

@ Jim

"To each his own I suppose. Doesn't sound like a group to me, sounds like individuals traveling the same stretch of trail at the same time."

That is insightful.
Because it is true.
Even with others, we rarely hike together.
Each has their own pace.
You are never more than 10 min ahead, or 10 min behind.
But you dont have to stare at someone elses backside the whole day
And each has the individual experience of being alone in the woods much of the time, even though that is just an illusion.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: 2 person cook system on 09/05/2013 12:44:39 MDT Print View

I use a Kmart 4 cup capacity "Grease Pot" and a one piece alcohol stove(top jet) that can simmer. Stove has 3 ounce fuel capacity. Has stainless steel pot support. Lights easily in cold weather via copper wick inside the fuel well. No priming necessary.

Top Jet alcohols stove with 3 ounce fuel capacity and also simmers.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: What cook system do you use for 2 people for 3-5 days? on 09/05/2013 12:52:14 MDT Print View

We use a Soto canister stove and take a couple small fuel cans, so everyone can carry a little fuel. Up the size of the cans for longer trips.

I use a 650ml Ti pot that stows the stove and one canister. We have an MSR Titan mug and an REI Ti Sierra cup for drinking and folding Ti sporks or spoons for utensils.

A Snowpeak Ti bowl with a pot grabber and a little foil for a lid usually sneaks into the mix. It can double as a pot while the other is busy and has many other uses.

Add a Victorinox Little Vickie paring knife for food prep and a small chunk of green scrubby sponge for cleanup. We use small plastic vials with wide tops for spices and condiments like hot sauce.

d k
(dkramalc) - MLife
Re: individuals on 09/05/2013 13:28:41 MDT Print View

"That is insightful.
Because it is true.
Even with others, we rarely hike together.
Each has their own pace.
You are never more than 10 min ahead, or 10 min behind.
But you dont have to stare at someone elses backside the whole day
And each has the individual experience of being alone in the woods much of the time, even though that is just an illusion."

True...and I really like the near poetic quality of was said above, as regards the hiking. But at the end of the day, I personally still prefer eating as a group; for me there is something special about sharing a good meal with others, whether in someone's home or out on the trail.

As I was typing this, a mental image of a hypothetical dinner party of BPL members (at somebody's home) came to mind: each one bringing a small pot and an individual serving, and cooking it separately for themselves ;-) Of course, I can see the reasons most people here seem to prefer to do their own meals when hiking in a group, and have no problem with others' wishes do it that way, but so far I have never done a group trip where we did not have dinner as a group. I would do it that way if the rest of the group were of that mindset, though I'd miss the communal aspect.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: individuals on 09/05/2013 14:15:31 MDT Print View

No, no, no!

I was on a hike with Craig W and we did not have any discussion about food beforehand. I would have not been interested in what he brought, had I known about it ahead of time.

As I sat enjoying my MH Lasagna, which I highly recommend, Craig opened his kit. He warmed some re-fried beans, warmed a tortilla over the stove and then cut up some fresh vegetables to go with it creating a wonderful looking and heavenly smelling burrito.

And that convinced me to start taking similar foods on some trips, something I used to do long, long ago in a different galaxy.

Derek M.
(dmusashe) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Cooking system for two on 09/06/2013 02:37:15 MDT Print View

Sean,
My wife and I use a 2 quart Open Country pot (the $16 non-anodized one with the bale). We also just cook with an small cook fire. If I suspect that we might get rained on or if there are fire restriction in the place that we're going, then we'll also bring a homemade "Simmer Cat" alcohol stove with about 2-3 ounces of alcohol fuel stored in a 0.5 ounce pill bottle.

In my opinion, a 1.5 liter capacity pot is the absolute smallest that I could ever go for a two-person pot. I like to cook fairly sizeable meals though, and I also usually do a lot more complicated cooking than just boiling water. YMMV.