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Jason Guerricabeitia
(BasqueJ88) - M
Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/02/2013 22:30:05 MDT Print View

How many of you use torso only pad (like a GG NightLight for example)? Do you find it to be comfortable enough to use a pack under your feet? Do you use more than one pad layer?

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/02/2013 22:33:44 MDT Print View

Is your inquiry limited to only foam pads?

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/02/2013 22:37:30 MDT Print View

Yay.
I use a pad that's just long enough that my hips aren't touching the ground. My lower body doesn't need a pad.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/02/2013 22:38:22 MDT Print View

Last Sierra solo I carried a Ridgerest cut to fit from my shoulders to just below my hips.

I find that if you're doing this, site selection is key; you will be uncomfortable and cold if you're on rock or hardpack.

Taking the time to find a decent site, making a depression for my hip bone, and arranging spare gear, pack, and other items as leg insulation and a pillow makes all the difference. My sleep quality with a minimal system is very proportionate to how much time/effort I put into making my bed.

Jason Guerricabeitia
(BasqueJ88) - M
Re: Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/02/2013 23:13:25 MDT Print View

Not limited to just foam, just interested to find out if any weight savings would be worth it. I currently use a regular NeoAir XLite(12oz), but if I can get something much cheaper(like foam) and sell off the XLite, that would be nice.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F - M
rope on 09/02/2013 23:35:51 MDT Print View

if you have a rope, flake it out and put it under yr legs

;)

Serge G.
(sgiachetti) - M

Locale: Boulder, CO
xlite on 09/03/2013 00:00:43 MDT Print View

unless you really need the money or don't like the xlite, I'd keep it. Its def more comfortable than a CCF. Like craig was saying, if you want to invest the extra time each night to find a good sleep setup, you can, or you can just plop down the xlite and pass out. 12 oz is very light for a full length sleeping situation. Eric, this is a backpacking forum. But you knew that :)

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/03/2013 00:04:14 MDT Print View

"Yay.
I use a pad that's just long enough that my hips aren't touching the ground. My lower body doesn't need a pad."

Clearly you have not slept at less than 20 degrees F before with that system?! It might be fine for more truly summer temps, but not for any serious cold unless you are well practiced in the Tibetan Tummo methods (as popularized by Wim Hof)...???

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Re: Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/03/2013 00:45:22 MDT Print View

"Clearly you have not slept at less than 20 degrees F before with that system?!"

I have, and it was very cold. I was forced to improvise ground insulation with natural materials.

I have noticed when it's cold and I'm using an insufficient pad, I am much warmer sleeping on my side. I'm exposing one side of my body to the cold ground instead of my entire back.

Kevin Burton
(burtonator) - M

Locale: norcal
works.. on 09/03/2013 01:18:25 MDT Print View

it works. But beware of false economies.

On colder nights it's going to be a bit rough. I always seem to play for +15% of or so additional warmth than I *REALLY* need.

Serge G.
(sgiachetti) - M

Locale: Boulder, CO
xtherm on 09/03/2013 01:37:48 MDT Print View

this is why although I'm continually tempted to shave the 8oz for an xlite torso, that I've stuck with the full lenth neo air xtherm as my all season pad. Even with a 40 degree quilt in spring and fall I have not had a cold night in that thing yet. Sleep is highly preferable to shivering.

Corbin McFarlane
(raven15) - MLife
Groundcloth Replacement? on 09/03/2013 01:42:15 MDT Print View

I just upgraded to a full length pad, because I realized I could then put it directly on the ground, eliminating groundcloth weight and keeping my whole body padded at the same time. On the other hand, if I have a groundcloth and it's warm I can skip the pad entirely...

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Groundcloth Replacement? on 09/03/2013 02:12:39 MDT Print View

I wouldn't want to go without a ground cloth in wet weather. Your sleeping bag is going to touch the wet ground at some point. And having a dry/clean area to set your gear down is important.

Jason Guerricabeitia
(BasqueJ88) - M
Re: Groundcloth Replacement? on 09/03/2013 02:50:11 MDT Print View

Skip the pad entirely?!?! Surley you jest : ). Just for clarification, I would be considering this type of setup for summer/ warm weather only.

mik matra
(mikmik) - M

Locale: Allways on the move
Here is my take on 09/03/2013 04:01:16 MDT Print View

Q1.I tried the torso only self inflating pad. No probs not having feet on a pad but sleeping on my back (preferred position for me to fall asleep) was uncomfortable on my lower back. Your feet are a bit lower than what your body and that is not something I am used to so I got lower back discomfort. Short pad out long pad in. In fact I am thinking of upgrading to a long/wide pad so I can have a bit more 'spread space'.

Q2.Yes I multi layer. I am a cold sleeper and will feel the cold from the ground. If the ground is damp like in a rainforest type of camping situation I just can't sleep from the cold! I have a synmat UL 7 but under that I put one of those closed cell foam pads. Mine weighs 150grams and is WELL worth the weight penalty for a better night sleep. Plus it is a multi use item....I also use it for in-camp mat to sit/lie on which is soo nice especially when the ground is wet.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Re: Groundcloth Replacement? on 09/03/2013 06:06:06 MDT Print View

"Skip the pad entirely?!?! Surley you jest : ). Just for clarification, I would be considering this type of setup for summer/ warm weather only."

Yes. Torso pads are mostly for the warm days of late spring, summer and early fall. I use a NiteLite, 3/4 lenghth pad when I know I will be out in the woods on a fairly dry weekend, 2-3 nights. I use my pack over some kicked up forest litter to make my bed full length. This year, it has mostly been wet, though. I don't use a ground cloth, so I bring the NeoAir. The 13oz makes a nice bed...nearly as comfortable as at home. The NiteLite often is used to level the sleeping area.

The Nunatak Luna pad is the closest I can buy today. I slice this up with an electric knife. Then tape the sections back together, "fanfold," nesting the bumps. This makes a good pad, and a pack frame, for about 10oz. Overall, it is about 51-52" long. It is about 2.5" thick when folded, and will support ~25-30 pounds in the packs pad holders. The one I use is about 2" thick, from being squashed for a few years... Several people make packs with pad holders these days, but Gossamer Gear makes them a signature. You do NOT need extra stiffeners/internal frames, etc. It works quite a bit better than the Klymit AirBeam, too. But you have to allow an extra 3-4 inches on the hip belt till the pad becomes "trained." This can take a year or two.

The Z-Lite does not work as well. Nor does a plain 1/2" blue foam pad. The entire pack system weighs about 21oz including the pack and pad. A 25oz sleeping bag and a 14oz tarp round out the camp/sleep/haul system.

Mark Ries
(mtmnmark) - M

Locale: IOWAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!
Re: Torso only pads, Yay or Nay? on 09/03/2013 07:56:49 MDT Print View

Yay after sleeping on a cushy inflatable I don't want to use ccf. After having a inflatable go flat and not be able to find the leak I don't want to be with out ccf. My solution is I cut my syn mat ul in half now I have two after adding a valve to the bottom half. So I carry a half length inflateable pad and half length ccf I lap them one foot and make a stuff sack pillow which lays on the ground. The ccf is also my pack pad and frame is great for countless camp chores and if the inflatable ever goes flat again it can be used as the torso pad. The three foot inflatable I find the most comfy to let air out till my hip or butt is almost touching the lapped ccf, since my hip is right at the edge of the pad it sinks faster than the rest of my torso which is high off the ground. This makes the transition smooth. If inflated to high and my butt is off the ground to high I get back pains sleeping on my back. Now I will work on attaching everything together although the more I sleep on it I get better at keeping it together

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Only Foam Works For Me on 09/03/2013 08:00:30 MDT Print View

I love my Z-Lite Torso on the ground and in the hammock.

I only like my Thermarest X-Therm torso pad in the hammock. Inflatables are too tall for torso pads for me unless I have an internal frame backpack I can put under my legs.

Like a true plebian, though, I've got an external frame.

Marc Eldridge
(meld) - MLife

Locale: The here and now.
Re: "Torso only pads, Yay or Nay?" on 09/03/2013 08:05:36 MDT Print View

"Yay after sleeping on a cushy inflatable I don't want to use ccf. After having a inflatable go flat and not be able to find the leak I don't want to be with out ccf."

When I am not hanging, which is my preference, I use a 3/8" evazote pad from Gossamer Gear and a small neo air. Don't have to worry about the pad going flat, am plenty warm and comfortable. The combo weighs 14oz. A little heavy but works great.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: "Torso only pads, Yay or Nay?" on 09/03/2013 10:22:02 MDT Print View

Nay for me, I have tried both and prefer a full lenght pad.