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How Much Extra Food? If Any?
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Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: re: food planning on 08/28/2013 20:06:58 MDT Print View

"Lecithin is yucky!"

To the point where I've considered sprinkling it on my food bag to repel bears.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: re: food planning on 08/28/2013 20:15:54 MDT Print View

"Anyone 60 or above who gnarls his way up over Harrison Pass in one day from Roads End deserves the finest in clean burning fuel for his next big adventure."

Somehow some misinterpretation got in there. Last year, I went from Roads End up to Lake Reflection in nine hours on the first day. On the second day, I went from there over Harrison Pass, down to Lake South America, and over to the next small lake.

Anyway, if you are over 60 and admit it, then that is your own damned fault. As I used to say to General Grant, "You are only as old as you think you are."

I felt pretty old this past weekend. We did a Trans-Sierra Dayhike over Piute Pass, which is around 27-30 miles. The first team went from Florence Lake to North Lake on Saturday, and then the second team went from North Lake to Florence Lake on Sunday. I was in the second team, and I didn't make it out until 1 a.m. that night. I could have used some better trail nutrition.

--B.G.--

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: re: food planning on 08/28/2013 20:34:50 MDT Print View

"Somehow some misinterpretation got in there. Last year, I went from Roads End up to Lake Reflection in nine hours on the first day. On the second day, I went from there over Harrison Pass, down to Lake South America, and over to the next small lake."

Ah. Well, then, if you'd of had some of Uncle Tom's home brew you would have been over Harrison in one day, no problem. Anyway, it was still a hump to be proud of. Even if you aren't over 60. ;)

On a more serious note, there is definitely something to be said for rapidly absorbed carbs on long days, especially with a little high quality protein mixed in.
I'm not advocating it as THE complete solution, but it's a good arrow to have in your quiver.

For me, it's the only one, but everyone is different.

A little context: I don't generally hike much more than 12-14 miles in a day, for which the 4.5-5 oz packet of "P" in combination with body fat is sufficient, but when I do go longer, I simple double/triple up on the "Perpetuem" and cruise. No need to chew, digest, worry about dental hygiene or messy wrappers, or any need to stop along the way, except to get water. This works for my medium mileage trips of up to 10 days. Beyond that, as Malto has demonstrated very well, you need a wider spectrum of nutrients in greater quantities.

If you decide to use it, Bob, would you let me know how it works for you?

John Vance
(Servingko) - F

Locale: Intermountain West
Extra Food on 08/28/2013 21:08:15 MDT Print View

For trips of 10 days or less I carry 17oz of food at 1550 calories per day and no extra. One nice thing about the aging process is the ultra slow metabolism and I generally come home at the same weight despite the low calories. At home I consume about 1,100 per day and find when I am out on the trail I have to force myself to eat all the food for each day.

I used to carry a full days worth of extra food for any trip longer than 4 days, but found that in 40 years of backpacking I have never needed it and often gave it away to others. On a thru hike of the PCT I missed a food drop and managed 3 days on a Snickers bar and some GORP until I could resupply and found that I was fine. At this point in my life skipping a day or two of food every once in a while would do me some good.

I am headed out to the Winds tomorrow for 11 days, and after reading and responding to this post, I am going to reduce some food and see if I can't lose a few pounds. I don't have big mileage planned - some 12 miles per day with moderate elevation - as I had a double hernia operation just a little over two weeks ago, and am still a bit uncomfortable. Getting out of the tent and getting my shoes on will be the more difficult aspects of the trip!

Edited by Servingko on 08/28/2013 21:10:42 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: re: food planning on 08/28/2013 21:19:48 MDT Print View

"If you decide to use it, Bob, would you let me know how it works for you?"

Well, I will sample it for sure. I use some Ensure powder on an almost daily basis. I really intended it for a close friend of mine, but I need to get the flavoring thing figured out. My friend is a coffee hound, so I was thinking along the lines of the Cafe Latte. Actually, I would probably first buy a package of the Hammer stuff, just to see what that is about. Then mix up some by your recipe. Then try it out on the friend who is more of an endurance traveler than I am.

After eight or ten miles, my appetite wanes, but my thirst is still going, so I have adapted to getting lots of calories from Gatorade, Vitalyte, Cytomax, and several other drink powders. Of course they have zero protein.

--B.G.--

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: How Much Extra Food? If Any? on 08/28/2013 22:03:52 MDT Print View

I think I'm gonna eat 2 lbs per day, but I bring 1.5 lbs, however I end up eating 1 to 1.25 lbs.

if solo I bring extra 3 cliff bars to budget for an extra half to full day.

imagine the worse case scenario or a seriously unfortunate series of events.
This actually happened: a small quake, triggered a rock slide and rocks the size of car tires were tumbling and flying at 40 mph.

I was lucky and I didn't get hurt, but had I broken a leg 12 miles away from a main trail to get help, I would crawl my way out if I have to.

I really do not want to compound my troubles with hunger and dizziness.

it isn't that I can't survive a week, there is a difference between being at optimal condition to deal with a trouble situation, or have a serious problem turn into a series of secondary issues.

in an emergency, I would ration those 3 extra Cliffies based on the situation.

Quite often these days, I run into unprepared trail people, that I may donate them a Cliffie...

Also if I have a trail buddy, I carry only +1 Cliffie, because between the both of us we would have extras, and enough to address emergencies and food shortage.

Other variables are if it's a new trail with little research available, then the risk is higher to get lost or misjudge difficulty, versus revisiting a favorite trail that I have memorized and know what to expect. Those I just bring a Cliffie for that sorry needy stranger I might run into.

Edited by RogerDodger on 08/28/2013 22:04:51 MDT.