Sleeping bags and footwear for Philmont
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Jeff Creamer
(jcreamer) - MLife
Sleeping bags and footwear for Philmont on 08/21/2013 17:01:14 MDT Print View

I have a 30 degree rated bag (WM megalite). Will this be adequate for Philmont? I don't know what trek we will be taking at this time. However, I know I am a cold sleeper. But this bag usually will carry me down to the high 20's.
Also, I greatly prefer low cut trail shoes. But, everyone seems to be set on wearing boots at Philmont due to the rocky surface. Is this really necessary. I've just never really had a comfortable pair of boots before. Any suggestions appreciated.
JC

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Sleeping bags and footwear for Philmont on 08/21/2013 17:24:53 MDT Print View

If you like low cut shoes, wear low cut shoes.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
sleeping bag on 08/21/2013 17:57:48 MDT Print View

More than enough bag.

Honestly, a 40F bag is all you need. Most of our scouts had 40F cheap bags in mid june.

The lowest expected temps in early june, at highest elevation camp (Mt Phillips) would only be about 30F. Add clothing and sleep in a tent, and you have that covered easily.

The rest of the time, you will sweat under a 30F bag.


You dont need boots for Philmont, or darn near anywhere else for that matter, unless you are carrying a very heavy pack. And then its for support underfoot, not mythological "ankle" support.

Edited by livingontheroad on 08/21/2013 17:59:58 MDT.

ed dzierzak
(dzierzak) - F

Locale: SE
bags and shoes on 08/22/2013 06:52:44 MDT Print View

Council contingent advisor here...

A 30 degree bag is more than adequate - that's what we recommend for those new to backpacking. Old hands know what they can get away with. I use a 40 degree bag - been there and know what to do when it gets colder.)

Likewise, we recommend boots or hiking shoes for newbees. Had a couple kids on the last trek think they were hot stuff and brought their Vibram Five-fingers. They were hurting but wouldn't admit it. Hiking boots, shoes, trail runners, whatever can take the abuse and deal with the rock encountered in places. My last trek was a combination of hiking shoes (low-cut) and trail runners.

Edited by dzierzak on 08/22/2013 06:54:02 MDT.

Dan Lee
(scoutbuff) - M

Locale: Colorado
BAGS AND BOOTS... on 08/22/2013 10:55:52 MDT Print View

Concur with all previously said with a couple cents tossed in...

Shoes, boots or whatever really need to have a stable foot plate. Shoes for trail running or hiking shoes or boots... Definitely more than a street running shoe or OMG five fingers... (We recently passed a guy hiking the 28-mile "Four Pass Loop" outside of Aspen with five fingers. He was about 1/3 around, miserable with bleeding feet...just dumb)

I think the other most significant issue is managing foot temperature with the right sock, powder, Glide or whatever (your preference)...

FWIW...

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
shoes on 08/22/2013 17:52:12 MDT Print View

"Shoes, boots or whatever really need to have a stable foot plate. Shoes for trail running or hiking shoes or boots... Definitely more than a street running shoe or OMG five fingers... (We recently passed a guy hiking the 28-mile "Four Pass Loop" outside of Aspen with five fingers. He was about 1/3 around, miserable with bleeding feet...just dumb)"


Depends on the person, and their pack.

I doubt many kids have the experience or the light pack to go with really minimal footwear, but many have worn street running shoes and done just fine.

The rocks at Philmont can be quite sharp in places, If its not sharp its very rough surface. I wore fairly minimal shoes and suffered some lug cuts and more sole wear than I expected over the distance travelled.

Edited by livingontheroad on 08/22/2013 17:53:48 MDT.

Jeff Creamer
(jcreamer) - MLife
Thanks guys... on 08/22/2013 19:20:42 MDT Print View

Really appreciate the input.
Jeff

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: footwear on 10/29/2013 13:52:48 MDT Print View

> (We recently passed a guy hiking the 28-mile "Four Pass Loop" outside of Aspen with five fingers. He was about 1/3 around, miserable with bleeding feet...just dumb)

As already stated, depends on the person. I was passed going down Trail Rider Pass by a young couple running the 4-pass loop in a day in similar footwear (minimal Keen sandals). They didn't seem to be having any trouble at all. I still would not recommend Scout-aged youth wear such footwear even if they normally wear them all the time. Knock yourself out once your feet are fully grown.