$7 Waist Belt
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jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: No Foam Sewing on 12/11/2013 07:22:55 MST Print View

I use 200 D fabric (because it stretches less than silnylon) and 1/8th inch foam for waist belt. Sew fabric into tube. Sew 3D cloth on the side that's against me. Put in foam. Sew one row of stitches through foam. And sew through everything to my pack which is one layer of silnylon. My home sewing maching does it but it's just barely. One thing is, I don't push or pull it through machine, that will form bird's nest underneath.

Same thing for shoulder straps.

I sew webbing just to ends. No need to go all the way around. The 200 D fabric is strong enough. If I had to sew through foam, webbing, 2 layers of 200D, 3D, and silnylon pack, my machine wouldn't work.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Insignia cloth on 12/11/2013 09:05:43 MST Print View

Samuel,

The edges do sometimes roll up a bit through prolonged use if the fabric edge repeatedly rubs on something. No fraying, however. Applying another piece of fabric over the rolled up area takes care of the problem.

One could allow enough fabric to fold it over and sew it outside of the foam piece edges and thereby eliminate raw edges.

I applied the fabric to a piece of closed cell foam and used it as a sit/knee pad for 5 years or more with no rolling or fraying.

The adhesive hasn't gone gummy on any of my projects.

Don't know about finished edges on insignia tapes. I don't recall buying any.

David Olsen
(oware)

Locale: Steptoe Butte
Make your own. on 12/11/2013 09:40:40 MST Print View

Sew up a simple tube of fabric. Something grippy is nice for hip belts, jerry's 210d for shoulder straps, fleece for climbing gear slings.

Slide the foam in. Wrap the foam in silnylon first so it slides easily into the tube. Once the foam is in place, pull out the silnylon.

Sew up both ends of the tube.

Then attach the webbing with line tacks using heavy needles and heavy thread and perhaps an awl. A one inch line tack every three or 4 inches works for me. Saddle stitching is the best I believe (Google it). Sear the thread ends after tying off.

If you need extra stiffness to prevent rolling, sew some 1 1/2" webbing on the fabric before forming the tube.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
Waist belts - to make or not to make on 12/11/2013 19:48:35 MST Print View

Thanks again, Daryl.
And thank you David O. for the silnylon slider idea. Might never have thought of that.

Jerry, you must have a pretty good machine. Mine would never sew through a thick fabric & foam sandwich without a monster presser foot that would flatten the sandwich at the stitch line.

So it sounds like a toss-up between the tubes and the Insignia cloth wrap.
That is amazing that the cloth adhesive holds up so well.

To obtain a good fit over the hipbone crest, I like hip belts with a seam separating the top and bottom of the belt. So, two tubes. And since my belts attach at the small of the back, the belt would have two sections, one for each hip, so four tubes.

Anything to be sewn to the belt where there is foam underneath would be sewn on before the foam is inserted into the tubes.

But the ends of the tube, that extend beyond the foam, could be sewn shut and to webbing or whatever after the foam is inserted.

Sounds like the big MYOG advantage is the ability to select exactly the foam and fabric desired, with the best strength for the weight. Of course, if one can find a replacement belt made by a pack maker who has already made these choices wisely, and it is for a reasonable price, that might be another story.

If possible, I like to buy the smaller parts, like shoulder straps and hip belts, ready made, and turn full attention to the pack itself. There is so much testing and decision making involved in MYOG, that making every part of the gear can be overwhelming. For example, choosing the best mesh material for the inner surface of the belt. Wouldn't know where to start, and it would be quite expensive and time consuming to try to test everything out there. Guess that is an argument for the ready made parts if they come from an experienced craftsperson.

Just some thoughts.

Edited by scfhome on 12/11/2013 19:52:08 MST.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Waist belts - to make or not to make on 12/11/2013 21:24:11 MST Print View

Samuel,

Good points.

Personally, I prefer to buy if I can find what I want.

I only make it if I can't find it already made by someone else.

My workmanship is always way below what other people provide.

Daryl

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Waist belts - to make or not to make on 12/11/2013 23:16:50 MST Print View

I have home machine - Janome Excel - maybe 15 years old?

My wife bought it and I'm the only one that uses it

Try it with your machine, it might work, 1/8" foam + 2 layers 200D + silnylon + 3D. Don't push or pull it, let the machine do the feeding.

Long ago, my mom accused me of breaking her machine, I think, but she was too kind to complain too much, so don't take my advice unless you don't mind breaking your machine

d k
(dkramalc) - MLife
Re: Re: Waist belts - to make or not to make on 12/12/2013 13:25:02 MST Print View

Daryl - where/how do you attach the lower end of your shoulder straps?

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: Re: Waist belts - to make or not to make on 12/12/2013 20:34:20 MST Print View

dk

I attach the lower end of the shoulder straps to a piece of webbing that is attached to the plumbing Tees at the bottoms of the vertical pack frame stays.

x

In the mock-up photo above the webbing running through the horizontal hole in the plumbing T would go to and through the ladder lock buckle on the bottom of the shoulder strap.

I tried photographing one of my packs to illustrate this but it is laughingly confusing when photographed with the other straps, cords, fabric, belts, etc. Hopefully this mock-up will do but let me know if it doesn't and I'll try again.

d k
(dkramalc) - MLife
Re: Waist belts/shoulder straps on 12/13/2013 15:31:29 MST Print View

I think that is pretty clear. Looks like the webbing goes through the entire horizontal part of the T with a knot at the far end. Thanks (again!).

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
sewing through a foam sandwich on 12/13/2013 19:38:01 MST Print View

Jerry,
Did not realize we were talking about only 1/8" thickness of foam.
The waist belts in my mind were using closer to 1/2" thickness of foam, before compression by a presser foot.

But I've not found any absolute criteria that assure there will be no tangles.
So if possible, I try sewing the sandwich first with scraps, and only doing a few stitches at a time so sewing can be stopped immediately if tangles start.
One of the pluses about the old Kenmore Zigzag machines is that you can sew extremely slowly and stop the process if tangles or other problems start. The agency where I was working at the time of purchase selected the machines for teaching beginners to sew, which was just right for me, so bought my own. Won't tell you when that was, though, as it would be giving too much away.

The new machine is a Pfaff, but hasn't been used yet. Traded in an Aelna for it because the Pfaff was more like the traditional Kenmore I was used to. Even the shopowner seller advised me to keep the more expensive Aelna, but resistance to change was involved. So much so that I'm still using the dying Kenmore with the Pfaff still sitting in the corner in its unopened carton. Eventually, it will all get sorted out.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: sewing through a foam sandwich on 12/13/2013 20:04:30 MST Print View

1/8th inch is okay for waistbelt, shoulder straps - for lightweight pack