Forum Index » Gear Lists » First overnight, gear list!


Display Avatars Sort By:
Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
First overnight, gear list! on 08/16/2013 13:14:24 MDT Print View

Hello all,

This coming weekend I'm beginning my transition from day hiking and car camping to backpacking. I'm super pumped. I'll be hiking two full days over the Franconia Ridge in NH with one overnight at a campsite. Temperatures for the trip should be highs in the mid 70s to lows in the low 50s.

I still need to add food. I'll probably buy some prepackaged stuff so I can focus on other things since it's my first trip. I'm borrowing a tent from a friend and I'm not yet sure what it is and what it weighs, but he said he backpacks with it and it works fine. I'll weight it and add it when i get it on Sunday. I'll also add a toothbrush, toothpaste or backing soda, and bug spray when i find a smaller container for it. I'll edit this as i go.

I know I have a few weight violators in the list, namely my Goretex shell and trekking poles, but they're all I have at the moment in their respective departments.

Do you think I have enough insulation? Baselayer, R2 fleece, and Houdini have proven to be pretty warm in the past. I have a Marmot Zeus i could throw in if necessary. As for legs, I figure my sleeping bag should be more than enough once I'm sheltered up. I could add a base layer or R1 pants if need be.

Any input would be much appreciated. Thanks!

http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=14804

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: First overnight, gear list! on 08/16/2013 13:44:52 MDT Print View

see if the tent can be Fast-packed.. fly only. (i'd still bring a polycro or tyvek ground sheet to protect your pad) might need it's special ground sheet to fastpack depending on the tent. Learn how to tie a clove hitch, you might need to use the little hooks on the tent platforms instead of staking to the ground

Skip the bug spray... they are long long.

Depending on the forecast you could skip the hardshell (or the Houdini if it looks raining) one or the other.

2nd pair of socks for day 2.. fresh socks.. so good

take a 16oz water bottle and chop the bottom off for a dipping cup for the Sawyer. the bags need a really good flow to fill up on their own. adds a few grams but makes life easier.

oh and throw all of your insulation stuff in a trash compactor bag for rain protection unless the Ohm is water resistant enough for the forecast

this is what i brought a few weeks ago (now i'd go with my EE revx 20 and no bug net)
http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=14195

Edited by JakeDatc on 08/16/2013 14:38:07 MDT.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
Re: Re: First overnight, gear list! on 08/16/2013 19:41:13 MDT Print View

Great info, thanks for all your help.

I'll ask my friend if I can setup the tent fly only. I'll follow your recommendation on the bottle half for the sawyer too. Makes sense.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: First overnight, gear list! on 08/16/2013 20:52:29 MDT Print View

Oh, and don't forget $8 bucks for the campsite. When are you going? weather lately has been awesome.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
Re: Re: Re: Re: First overnight, gear list! on 08/18/2013 18:13:28 MDT Print View

Ok, I got the tent. Its a Sierra Designs Lightning 2 Person. I threw it on the scale and its 5.0lbs. It can be fast packed though and using the fly, poles, stakes, and footprint its 3.1lbs. I have it setup in the living room now in fast pack mode. The fly comes down to about 10" from the ground all around. So quite a bit of ventilation all around. I almost wonder if its too much if it gets breezy. It should be around 50-54F at night. I have a 30F down bag. Think that's ok? What's the tree cover like at the Liberty Falls tentsite?

I'm going this Friday-Saturday. The weather forecast is looking good. Possibly a tstorm the day before so it might be a little damp.

I guess I'll make a call on the hardshell based on the weather the day before. The Houdini makes a pretty lousy raincoat so I'd hate to get caught out in only that.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
Re: First overnight, gear list! on 08/18/2013 18:30:51 MDT Print View

If it's only getting down to the high 50's at night, I would just bring a windshirt. That sounds like perfect (easy) weather for a first trip.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: First overnight, gear list! on 08/18/2013 22:53:01 MDT Print View

Tent should be fine. This time last year I was in Vermont sleeping in 3 sided shelters for 2 weeks thru-hiking the LT with a 45* quilt, long sleeve merino and a smartwool sweater ;) Have a decent warm hat and you're good to go.

looks fairly sheltered..
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-X_y_bKgiqSY/Tn99mRaScyI/AAAAAAAAQdE/I73sjS31mCQ/s1600/P1050968.JPG

If you can tie a clove hitch, you can probably leave the stakes at home. The sides of the platforms have hooks or loops on the sides and your tent is already free standing, so you mostly only need it to not fly away while you're not in it.

this is how i used them last year. you can use a stick instead of a stake
stake

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
update, rain? on 08/20/2013 08:09:02 MDT Print View

Thanks, i added some utility cord to the list and will pack four stakes for either using in the ground or using like you show above. Pretty slick. Yep, i can clove hitch 'er up.

It looks like the cold front is pushing out in the week a little more. Possible rain/tstorms Friday now, but then beautiful highs of 69-70F and lows around 49F. I can always push the trip to Sat-Sun if it looks like lightning could be a real issue while I'm up on the ridge.

This has me thinking more about being prepared for rain, though. As of now I have no real rain protection on the list. I can bring my Theta AR shell but its beefy at 18.7oz. But i own it so its free.

It looks like cheap emergency ponchos at REI are still $30 and 11oz.

I see OR Helium IIs are on sale at EMS for $105. I could grab one of those at 6.4oz and finally have a proper summer raincoat. It'd be nice to have for all my hiking trips above treeline where I normally lug the Theta AR. Would the Houdini and Helium then be an odd couple? I guess at their weights it wouldn't be bad.

The list is otherwise complete except for a toothbrush, toothpaste, and hand sanitizer/soap. If you see anything I'm missing please let me know.

http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=14804


I'm probably overanalyzing (I fit right in here), especially for such an easy/short trip, but I'm doing this to prepare for longer trips so I want to get proper.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: update, rain? on 08/20/2013 08:54:21 MDT Print View

i don't like poncho's for the Whites.. trees are usually too close and you get caught up and can't see your feet.

I think rain gear is one that you just have to decide what is needed. That comes with experience and risk assessment. i wouldnt bring a hardshell and the houdini.. i hike in my short sleeves most of the time and only put on a jacket if i'm stopped in the wind.

you can also make arm warmers with old ski socks that make going from long sleeve to short sleeve light and easy to change.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
Re: Re: update, rain? on 08/20/2013 15:09:48 MDT Print View

Yeh, i was saying that the poncho looked like a crappy deal.

The weather forecast is improving, no rain at all this week or next they're now saying. So that makes things simpler. :)

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
wind shirt on 08/20/2013 17:44:17 MDT Print View

I would say bring the houdini, and pick up a 99 cent garbage bag style poncho. Or buy two, they are about an ounce each and are 100% water proof.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
Re: wind shirt on 08/21/2013 07:40:03 MDT Print View

Yep, that's what I'll do. I don't like the idea of being above treeline with rain/tstorm potential with lows in the upper 40s without some kind of rain protection. I'll grab a cheap/light emergency poncho or maybe just bring an extra trash bag that I could stick my head through.

I'm also thinking that I'd like to bring some kind of additional shirt to sleep in. Musty Cap 1 is pretty uncomfortable. I'll probably bring either a normal tshirt or maybe an MEC Cap 4'esque hoody. Predicted low at night is now 47 and my shelter is open a foot on all sides.

Is hand sanitizer generally adequate or should i go for soap? If i had soap I'd wash my Cap 1 shirt at night for the next day, but that'd simply be a bonus.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Re: wind shirt on 08/21/2013 08:05:24 MDT Print View

sanitizer is good. i'm not a fan of soap backpacking since even "biodegradable" stuff isn't great for water sources. can hang your SS up when you get into camp and throw on the houdini or fleece for a bit until it dries. little sponge bath with a bandana or pack towel.

i usually wear my short sleeve during the day and wear my LS icebreaker 200 at night. Reducing the amount of overlapping clothes is one of the easier ways to keep weight down. I try not to carry any clothes that will do the same thing.

LT= 19 days, 3 showers, 2 laundries haha :)

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
Re: Re: Re: wind shirt on 08/21/2013 08:08:18 MDT Print View

Yeh, that's true. My R2 plus the wool beanie is super comfy and will cover the sleep base. must. resist. urge. to. add. more. crap.


OH YEAHHH I'M PUMPED.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
more updates on 08/21/2013 19:41:46 MDT Print View

Added more stuff. I repacked the freeze dried meals into ziplocks and saved almost 3oz. I remembered to add my iPhone, + 4.9oz :(

I could knock of 7.5oz if i switch from the R2 fleece to the MEC T2 (kinda like a Cap4 hoody) instead. A little lighter, but maybe that plus the Houdini would be adequately warm for sitting around at night and to sleep in. I could potentially drop the wool hat since it has a hood.. but i'm not so sure. 49F is fairly chilly with hardly any shelter from the wind.

EDIT: Actually, i'm going to take my smartwook Midweight long sleeved zip top. It weights almost as little as the T2 and its very warm. More than enough. I'll replace the R2 Fleece with it.

Edited by TXBDan on 08/21/2013 19:46:10 MDT.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: more updates on 08/21/2013 19:54:04 MDT Print View

haha.. this is why you do overnights before you start busting out longer trips.. for 1-2nights you can get away with just about anything. after this you will see what you prefer more

Kate Magill
(lapedestrienne) - F
Re: more updates on 08/22/2013 11:33:56 MDT Print View

Looks like a great list, Dan! Well thought out and little to no excess. Weather is unpredictable in the Whites, for sure, but don't get too nervous about it. There are opportunities to get off the ridgeline if things start to seem too sketchy. And lots of covered shelters to wait things out.

My only suggestion is to make sure you have a little spending cash on you. Sometimes the bottomless soup at the huts is irresistible (and darn cheap) as part of a mid-day break. Yummy baked goods, too. Depending on your route and schedule, the huts can seriously help you reduce the weight of your food bag.

Have fun!

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
wait, baked goods?! on 08/22/2013 13:33:19 MDT Print View

Ha, that's a great tip. I have a feeling I'll need to visit every hut I encounter now.

It'd be pretty slick to plan a route and your packing to fully utilize what the huts have to offer along the way... next time I'll consider that after i do more research. Thanks!

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Cold hard cash on 08/22/2013 14:12:11 MDT Print View

>"My only suggestion is to make sure you have a little spending cash on you."

$5 and $10 bills only weigh a gram each. If you can convert them into soup and brownies, you're on your way to SUL!

I memorize my credit card info (which weighs 0 grams) but it only helps for mail order and in stores where they recognize me.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
bump for adding a day and food input on 08/22/2013 17:46:16 MDT Print View

I decided to stay a second night and half a third day. I'll be hiking for 8 hrs the first day, 8hrs the second, and 5 the third.

I added food, but man is the weight adding up. Care to review? :)

http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=14804

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: bump for adding a day and food input on 08/22/2013 21:20:30 MDT Print View

I think you have to just go for it and figure out what works for you. in the end it's up to you and what you use. maybe keep a few notes on your iphone about what stuff gets used and what doesn't

Joe Annese
(dirtbaghiker) - M
rain gear on 09/08/2013 07:54:27 MDT Print View

I recently picked up a Sierra Designs cloud rain shell. It's pretty impressive..weighs about 4 ounces I believe and the pants weigh 3.5 ounces. If you are still searching for.lightweight rain gear, its worth a look.