Forum Index » Gear Lists » What I'm Taking on my JMT Hike (this is how you do it)


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ROBERT TANGEN
(RobertM2S) - M

Locale: Lake Tahoe
David Chenault: watched him naked while wearing his pack? on 08/06/2013 13:16:25 MDT Print View

I'm no expert, but can you really tell his pack is too small unless you (1) see him naked while wearing the pack or (2) feel under his pack hip belt while he's wearing it? I don't really know what I'm talking about, but I've ben told the hip belt should go OVER the pelvis bone, not above it and not below it. How can you tell where it is?

His shoulder straps seem to go up and over his shoulders, forming an upside-down "U" shape, which they tell me means the pack is not too long.

rOg w
(rOg_w) - F - M

Locale: rogwilmers.wordpress
deleted on 08/06/2013 13:46:17 MDT Print View

deleted

Edited by rOg_w on 09/08/2013 18:00:07 MDT.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Thread drift on 08/06/2013 14:12:25 MDT Print View

Hmmm... I am sure his TOTAL pack weight was pretty light. Probably doesn't matter.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Thread drift on 08/06/2013 15:59:40 MDT Print View

"Hmmm... I am sure his TOTAL pack weight was pretty light. Probably doesn't matter."

+1

Plus I think it is unworthy to be snippy about a guy who can do that many miles per day! The East German judge deducts 0.5 points for bad style.

Edited by millonas on 08/06/2013 16:03:08 MDT.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Re: Thread drift on 08/06/2013 18:58:34 MDT Print View

Dennis Ahern JMT 2012 Fastpack Gear

Starting weight was stated as 30#, including clothes worn, but not water.

When he pulled out the bear canister with food his pack came in at 19.5#

And I noticed that between the weigh-in and the hike the pack changed.

So, +/- on the weights, but still, surprisingly heavy.

Edited by greg23 on 08/06/2013 19:00:58 MDT.

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Re: Re: Re: Thread drift on 08/06/2013 19:17:19 MDT Print View

While hiking in sierras this year I came across the very first PCT hiker and the very last PCT hiker.

The last was by a guy named Oxen.
He was consuming over 5000 calories a day and had two full canisters and was carrying over 100 pounds for up to 8 days oh hiking.
Since everyone says hike your own hike; Well you can have that hike.

Greg F
(GregF) - F

Locale: Canadian Rockies
Re: What I'm Taking on my JMT Hike (simplicity at it's best) on 08/06/2013 19:37:00 MDT Print View

I think you can cut more weight and Items out of your system.

- T/P - you don't give a wait to it but 5 days of Toilet paper is at least 3 oz and can easily be left behind by bring a 1/2 ounce of soap.

- MP3 Player - 1oz - this is a pure luxury item
- Water - there are lighter but less durable options for water. You could probably save 1/2 oz
- Phone and Charger -- Luxury Items

Air beam and pump. Even at max weight of 15lbs on your back I don't thing you need a pack frame so adding the pump seems like dead weight. Would a 1/8 pad provide better padding for sleeping and stiffnes for the weight?


I like your no rain jacket, no extra insulation philosophy. If there is no around the camp time that extra insulation isn't needed and your ground sheet works as an emergency tarp / Poncho.

The only item I might add is a big black garbage bag as if you did get injured this item would allow you to hike slowly out in the rain at the cost of less than an ounce. Although your Polycro ground sheet might allow you to do the same.

Have fun, I have only ever done overnighters with an SUL kit

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Re: What I'm Taking on my JMT Hike (simplicity at it's best) on 08/06/2013 20:16:39 MDT Print View

Greg,

Thanks for the insight.
I always wipe with nature first and depending on how bad, 1 TP wipe usually works, so should be less than an ounce of TP.

Yes the MP3 is a lux item.
The phone is for both pictures and just in case something happens and my car is at Whitney Portal (hence the charger).

I will change the poly to a large sheet, 3.65 ounces as a just in case item and can also take the place of the trash bag.
Trying to get a 40" width poly sheet to cover you isn't that fun.

Lighter options on water yes, but none with a wide mouth.
Have no idea why they can't make soft bottles with a wide mouth.
Sure there are zip-top ones but they weigh a lot more than a gatorade bottle.

I have heard of someone doing the JMT with just a straw. Hmmm...

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Re: What I'm Taking on my JMT Hike on 08/07/2013 16:29:56 MDT Print View

I totally get your fast-pack philosophy and what you're going for. It's not meant to be "comfortable". I wish you good weather and good times. I'll be in the region (slow-packing) a few weeks before you.

Someone previously quoted the regulations for the area, and I'd like to add an opposing opinion on their conclusion:

Code of Federal Regulations
Title 36 - Parks, Forests, and Public Property Volume: 1
Date: 2007-07-01Original Date: 2007-07-01
Title: CHAPTER I - NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
Context: Title 36 - Parks, Forests, and Public Property.

"Camping means the erecting of a tent or shelter of natural or synthetic material, preparing a sleeping bag or other bedding material for use, parking of a motor vehicle, motor home or trailer, or mooring of a vessel for the apparent purpose of overnight occupancy."
They concluded that, "If you walk thru the night and nap during the day, you are not camping.
If you are not camping, a bear canister is not required."

I think that's a slight misunderstanding of the language of the reg. -- in law, commas used in a law/reg. are generally interpreted as an "or", rather than an "and" -- which means that is you erect a shelter OR prepare bedding material -- you are "camping" in the sense of the reg., regardless of whether it's day or night. A NAP would mean that you're just lying down temporarily (without bedding or shelter).

Dave T
(DaveT) - F
agreed. on 08/07/2013 17:49:06 MDT Print View

> If you walk thru the night and nap during the day, you are not camping.
If you are not camping, a bear canister is not required.

"...preparing a sleeping bag or other bedding material for use... for the apparent purpose of overnight occupancy."


I'd say if you head into the backcountry overnight and plan on sleeping at some point, I think you are camping. Definitely don't agree with the interpretation that if you walk at night and sleep during the day for several days, somehow you aren't camping.

Edited by DaveT on 08/07/2013 17:51:43 MDT.

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: agreed. on 08/07/2013 22:13:41 MDT Print View

The one thing I can say about this is that the 2 rangers I came in contact with were in areas where you can hang.
I'm pretty sure I told him I'm hanging and just hiking strait through the areas where the canisters are required.

I was also using a striped down 1200 ci pack, so it wasn't like I could hide the face that I didn't have a canister.
Both rangers did tell me the same thing though and had zero care that I didn't have one.

Valerie E
(Wildtowner) - M

Locale: Grand Canyon State
Re: agreed on 08/08/2013 11:30:04 MDT Print View

Aaron, I am with you that we have to remember the PURPOSE of the bear-proof container rules. If you're not going to stop and sleep in the areas where containers are required, then you're NOT required to have a container! But the rule is there to prevent bears from finding UNATTENDED food belonging to a sleeping hiker (regardless of whether the person is sleeping during the day or at night), and to discourage bears from associating "campsites" with yummy, easily-available treats. Clearly, what you are planning to do is not going to result in your food being unattended...and no bears will be harmed in the process! :~)

Bradley Attaway
(AttaboyBrad) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Too much philosophy on 08/08/2013 15:11:31 MDT Print View

Legal interpretation and philosophical purpose are well and good until you're dealing with the enforcement of that law, which is essentially up to the rangers. I no longer hang my hammock in SF city parks not because the law prohibits it (which it certainly does not) but because the Park Rangers will cite me regardless if I don't take it down because that's what they've been told to do.

I likewise carry a bear canister when I do to protect myself from citations much more so than bears.

Call ahead. Ask the Park Rangers if hiking straight through is adequate excuse to travel without a bear canister. If they say it is, ask to get it in writing or at least for a name that you can cite if you get hassled. The fine for not having one is pretty hefty, and they're a pain to fight even if you're in the right.

If you don't, I hope your moral victory is worth more than the fine you'll have to pay or fight ;-)

Edited by AttaboyBrad on 08/08/2013 15:22:07 MDT.

ROBERT TANGEN
(RobertM2S) - M

Locale: Lake Tahoe
Squat on foam under a tarp or inside a tent? on 08/08/2013 15:48:55 MDT Print View

Aaron said: “How is setting up a tent and getting in supposed to help you in lightning? You keep moving.”

Previously, Hobbes said: “…lay out a CCF pad & assume "the position" (no, not that position - the anti-lightning squat.”

Could you combine the two and assume the squat on a foam pad under a tarp or inside a tent? In both cases, the shoe soles are providing protection from a lightning hit, but with a squat, the foam pad adds another layer of protection.

Randy Martin
(randalmartin) - F

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Re: What I'm Taking on my JMT Hike (simplicity at it's best) on 08/08/2013 17:14:08 MDT Print View

@Aaron "Have no idea why they can't make soft bottles with a wide mouth." Nalgene Canteen but reviews on REI unfortunately seem to indicate they are not very durable so maybe not the best option.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: What I'm Taking on my JMT Hike (simplicity at it's best) on 08/08/2013 17:21:40 MDT Print View

"Have no idea why they can't make soft bottles with a wide mouth."

Because typically the seperate lid needs to be a rigid plastic because of screw threads and openings. If you put a rigid plastic lid on a soft bottle, and then if you squeeze it, the lid pops off and lands on the trail. You can beat that problem, but it requires reinforcement to the top of the bottle around the screw threads, and that adds expense to the manufacturing process.

--B.G.--

Joshua Ellis
(jbaysurfer) - F

Locale: West Coast
Sierra has no plural... on 08/20/2013 20:02:49 MDT Print View

LOL..I wrote a whole huge post but felt bad after reading it.

Just drink with a straw, leave the electronic bling behind along with the chargers and spare batteries and carry some painkillers so there's a reduced chance of SAR being required for an extraction.

That'll save you some weight, and yeah, it rains in September. And snows. ;-)

Edited by jbaysurfer on 08/20/2013 20:06:19 MDT.

Dan D
(TXBDan) - M

Locale: Boston, MA
Re: Sierra has no plural... on 08/21/2013 13:35:12 MDT Print View

I hope you guys know that the idea that rubber soled shoes will protect you from lightning is false.

ROBERT TANGEN
(RobertM2S) - M

Locale: Lake Tahoe
Lightning protection on 08/21/2013 16:02:33 MDT Print View

I wrote: "...assume the squat on a foam pad under a tarp or inside a tent? In both cases, the shoe soles are providing protection from a lightning hit, but with a squat, the foam pad adds another layer of protection." I did NOT say that shoe soles provide COMPLETE protection. Otherwise, why bother to add another layer of protection? I meant that they provide SOME protection. Being inside a fire lookout with multiple lightning rods MAY come close to complete protection. Not all hits are direct hits, and not all are totally devastating. My points are: (1) getting foam between you and the ground is better than not doing so, and, (2) why not be protected from the rain by being under a tarp or tent while you do the anti-lightning squat?

Scott Bentz
(scottbentz) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Calories on 08/22/2013 12:08:14 MDT Print View

Aaron,

My son is planning on a 7day JMT trip and was wondering how many calories you are alloting per day. This post has been pretty helpful. What type of canister are you taking?

Thanks,

Scott