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Bright colors or not?
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Cameron Reed
(cameronjreed) - F
Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 10:22:08 MDT Print View

I'm getting ready to make my first backpack. It is going to be an attempt at "ultra-light". I will post pictures when the project is completed.
I will be making a pattern and most likely I will be making a "mock-up" before I have the final product just the way I want it.
My question is on the final product. Which do you prefer...Bright colored gear (reds, greens, yellows, etc) or do you prefer the more subdued colors (browns, black, dark gray, camo, etc)
I am just curious. I am thinking of making my pack yellow with black and dark gray accents, but want to get others thoughts and opinions.

John Haley
(Quoddy) - F

Locale: New York/Vermont Border
Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 10:30:30 MDT Print View

I think that there is a reason that so many UL/SUL backpacks are predominately green. Subdued green is certainly my favorite color as it matches the clothing and other gear that I buy.

Neil Bender
(nebender) - F
Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 10:52:30 MDT Print View

For packs I like light neutral colors (silver, gray, or tan) so there is good visibility when looking into the pack. I also like to use different colored webbing, and never black webbing which has no contrast against black plastic fittings. Same with drawcords and zipper pulls, I like them to be visible. For backpacking I like subdued colors that blend in in case I need to stealth camp. I prefer high visibility clothing for safety for mountaineering and bicycle touring, but subdued colors otherwise. On the Oware tarp web page there used to be a good discussion of colors for tarps.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 11:07:24 MDT Print View

Different tools for different tasks...

In the winter, bright colors can be seen more easily, without much downside.

In the summer, wearing bright colors can attact an awful lot of insects... White is probably the worst.

Colleen Clemens
(tarbubble) - F

Locale: dirtville, CA
Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 11:15:48 MDT Print View

i think you should use the colors that make you happy. i personally have no problem with bright colors in the wilderness. i like happy, bright colors. i'd like to make a red tent, but the husband objects strongly. so it'll probably end up just like almost every other silnylon tent out there - grey.

the only reason i can think of for choosing "blend in" colors is if you don't want to be seen. i can think of more positive results of being visible than i can of negative results from it.

Jason Brinkman
(jbrinkmanboi) - MLife

Locale: Idaho
Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 11:21:33 MDT Print View

I prefer subdued colors like tans, sage, greens, or greys whenever possible. I've never needed to stealth camp for trespass reasons, but I generally prefer that I am not as readily seen. It tends to enhance the wilderness experience for me and other folks in the area. I avoid camo so that the people that I do meet don't think that I am poaching wildlife, cultivating drugs, hiding from the government, stalking people, etc.

That said, my bivy is eVENT yellow, the only color which was available when I got it. They make grey, but I haven't seen it in wide distribution yet. However, my poncho-tarp is green, so I can fairly well shield the yellow from view.

One of the common questions with the recent pre-sale of the Artic Dry Pack was "when will subdued-color replacements for the orange drybag be available?".

Also, some pretty helpful advice on the Make Your Own Gear forum here at BPL if you want to discuss technical aspects of the pack. Good luck. Post pictures.

kevin davidson
(kdesign) - F

Locale: Mythical State of Jefferson
colors for a pack on 06/05/2007 11:36:41 MDT Print View

Dark colors absorb more heat. A black pack will have warmer contents on a sunny Summer's day. This can be a negative for some foods, sensitive electronic items, etc.

Neutral colors, perhaps with some bright trim (for hunting season safety) might be the best all-around approach. Gray for example. But something like a mid-range green or blue, or perhaps a burnt orange, would work, too.

Materials selection might dictate color. Some fabrics are available in very limited colors.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 11:54:21 MDT Print View

I saw a bright neon orange Mountain Hardwear silnylon pack yesterday at a gear shop. I am still rubbing my eyes. It was, er, a tad bit bright ;-)

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Re: Bright colors or not? on 06/05/2007 19:39:25 MDT Print View

Hello,
When going U/L and U/fast, I try to get as many different colors as possible.
Still following the light colors for heat and darker for cold.
It is nice to reach into your pack with a quick look and already know exactly what your looking for.
The hardest thing to do is to make them so they don't clash.
Although while you're out hiking, nobody cares if you looking like a clown.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Bright Colors or Dark? Neither. on 06/05/2007 19:59:09 MDT Print View

Aaron:

Take the middle road -- just pick two or so 'neutral' colors:

1. they'll never be too hot (like black under the sun)
2. they'll never be too cold (like white in winter)
3. they'll never clash

Chris Conway
(LNTpunk) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: nobody cares if you look like a clown on 06/07/2007 19:51:35 MDT Print View

If I can't see you in your "clown gear" I could care less.. to each his own... I hope you enjoy yourself........ but in open terrain it can take away from the natural scenery if your bright gear can be seen from afar... and unfortunately your enjoyment of colors that don't blend in can lessen my enjoyment by impacting my wilderness experience.

All too often I am distracted by people off in the distance wearing red, orange, yellow, etc against a backdrop of green. It's hard to not notice. I'm certain if they were wearing earthtone colors I would never have seen them.



+Peace

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
nobody cares if you think I look like a clown on 06/07/2007 20:26:05 MDT Print View

I find wearing a red jacket or hat attracts hummingbirds. I find that pleasant.

The Redleader

cary bertoncini
(cbert) - F

Locale: N. California
colors - i may be convinced now on 06/07/2007 20:28:29 MDT Print View

i often go for drab colors, but since i also often go alone, i'm thinking it should be bright colors from now on in case i'm ever injured & in need of help

Shawn Basil
(Bearpaw) - F

Locale: Southeast
Bright colors on 06/07/2007 20:56:05 MDT Print View

On the flip side, if you're in an area prone to ATV traffic and you want to avoid run-ins with this population, subdued colors are far preferable in order to stealth camp.

In higher mountains, I often choose some visible colors for rough weather like my burnt orange rain jacket. But I usually find I am more comfortable with less visible colors.

Chris Conway
(LNTpunk) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: injured & in need of help on 06/07/2007 21:01:21 MDT Print View

I do alot of solo trips and IMHO a whistle or personal locator beacon would be more effective in signaling for help. Though in winter I personally would wear more visible colors.... you won't find me wearing all white for sure.

Colleen Clemens
(tarbubble) - F

Locale: dirtville, CA
Re: Re: nobody cares if you look like a clown on 06/08/2007 00:09:54 MDT Print View

i don't mean to be provocative or pick on anybody, but i have never understood how seeing other people in the distance, or passing a yellow tent, or somebody weraing a pink hat (like me) can lessen one's "wilderness experience." if you don't want to be around other people, you have to go where people don't go. i've never been one to pretend that i have the wilderness to myself, so being able to see people off in the distance, or even pass them on the trail, has never bothered me at all.

in fact, i *like* being able to see where others are. last September, we had a great time watching two climbers going up Cloudripper (i think it was Cloudripper) while we were topping out over Bishop Pass in the Sierra Nevada. we never would have seen them if they had been in black or grey. they spotted us watching them, and we all yelled our hellos. it was a fun moment. but then i like people and have pretty much accepted that i have to live with them, so except for the stupid ones ;) i'm happy with most folk. be they in chartreuse or taupe.

pondering - is the dislike of visibilty related to a dislike of humankind in general? meaning, if you are inclined to dislike "people," then are you more inclined to dislike visible evidence of "people?"

kevin davidson
(kdesign) - F

Locale: Mythical State of Jefferson
Clown? In Europe this is normal on 06/08/2007 00:32:37 MDT Print View

I love my acid green hard shell and a couple of my softshells are positively radioactive. :-D
My tents are gold in color---both to easily find them in low visability conditions
and to have a psychologically more cheerful environment in inclement weather---particularly if I'm going to be seeing a whole lot of the inside of my shelter while waiting out the weather.

Viva our tasteless backcountry wardrobes!

And yes, I agree with Tarbubble, here. With the possible exception of unruly youth groups and horsepackers and... :-)>

Edited by kdesign on 06/08/2007 00:38:42 MDT.

Jason Brinkman
(jbrinkmanboi) - MLife

Locale: Idaho
Re: Re: Re: nobody cares if you look like a clown on 06/08/2007 00:51:26 MDT Print View

From Wilderness.net:
"Wilderness is... rare, wild places where one can retreat from civilization, reconnect with the Earth, and find healing, meaning and significance."

And pretend that you are alone if you so choose.

Edited by jbrinkmanboi on 06/08/2007 01:10:31 MDT.

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Some of us don't mind looking like clowns on 06/08/2007 13:44:40 MDT Print View

Thank you Colleen. If one stealth hikes one won't see or be seen by others. Real Stealth Hikers exult in their stealthieness. More power to them. Just so stealth doesn't become stalk.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
When I truly want to blend in on 06/08/2007 15:11:10 MDT Print View

I wear these pants:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

And these shoes:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Hehheh.....