Going Stoveless - Cold Food for Thought
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Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
Going Stoveless - Cold Food for Thought on 06/25/2013 19:43:17 MDT Print View

It is wildfire season here in the Rockies. And with the fires come bans on certain types of backpacking stoves. A good reason to look at going stoveless while backpacking.

Here's why I think why going stoveless could be a good option for some backpackers:
Going Stoveless: Cold Food For Thought


(Yes, I am being lazy and just linking to my web site :) )

Edited by PaulMags on 06/25/2013 19:44:42 MDT.

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: Going Stoveless - Cold Food for Thought on 06/28/2013 02:36:25 MDT Print View

I like your approach to this topic that many get extremely defensive.
Stoveless is an option, not a mandate.

1) Regarding the morning coffee request, for me, I bring along the chocolate covered expresso coffee beans. It isn't the Cup o' Joe romantic experience, but it's a dry medium to consuming the caffeine, eating your coffee. :)


2) Semantics, it's not really stoveless. I say that and people confuse it with eating raw twigs and green pine cones. I use a stove at home to prep my meals. Basic meal left-overs concept. For most of the 3 day trips, I vacuum seal home-cooked rice/ground beef and beans then freeze the highly perishable foods and consume them first. Leaving the dry goods for last.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Going Stoveless - Cold Food for Thought on 06/28/2013 08:38:53 MDT Print View

This was one of my early UL techniques 30 years ago ( stoves and pots were heavier then). My dinners looked a lot like my lunches, but that's okay for a 9-day trip.

An additional advantage: if you're trying to make miles, you can hike as you nibble.

Another: I warm up quicker in the morning by hiking while eating my oatmeal cookies* than I do standing around in the cold waiting for water to boil and waiting for breakfast to cool enough to eat/drink it.

* if breakfast = cereal + fruit + nuts + some sugar, then breakfast = oatmeal cookies. If you don't cook, Trader Joe's cranberry oatmeal cookie are quite tasty and keep a long time.

I do a lot of wraps on my death marches. My own, or just bought from the deli section of the grocery store.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Cal/Col Hiking and Outdoor Society on 06/28/2013 11:19:57 MDT Print View

This thread was 2/3 CHAOS alumni.

Now it is 3/4.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
stoveless on 06/28/2013 13:23:59 MDT Print View

> Stoveless is an option, not a mandate.

Indeed! That's what I try to stress to people with most gear choices. "Here's an option; maybe it will work?"

This is the second season in a row where I've pretty much put the kibosh using an alchie stove. For me it is sans stove or canister.

>CHAOS


Good times..good times. :)

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: stoveless on 06/28/2013 13:57:38 MDT Print View

I often go stoveless, not a big deal for me as I am not a coffee or Tea drinker but I know buddies that are cranky without hot drinks :-)

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Hunting and stoveless eating on 06/29/2013 11:24:04 MDT Print View

When I go to the Ruby Mountains in northern Nevada to hunt mule deer this October I'll be going stoveless to eliminate cooking odors.

I won't like it but with all the hunting gear I have to carry it will also help lighten the load. I AM sorely tempted to take my CC Sidewinder and the 12-10 alky stove W/ 3 cup pot B/C it's very light and far more odorless than ESBIT - but I won't.

1. rifle & scope -> 10 lbs. (Browning A-Bolt & Bushnell HDMR scope)
2. plastic roll-up deer sled & tow rope -> 2 lbs.
3. large lock blade dressing out knife -> 6 oz.
4. elbow length nitrile gloves & gallon ZipLoc bags (for heart & liver) -> 4 oz.
5. laser rangefinding binoculars -> 2.5 lbs.
6. baggie of wipes (clean up after field dressing) -> 3. oz.

But it's all worth it if I can bring home venison.

"Hapiness is a warm gut pile."

Edited by Danepacker on 06/29/2013 11:27:47 MDT.

Josh Garst
(BoshyTime)
stoveless on 06/30/2013 08:11:38 MDT Print View

When I'm solo backpacking I go stoveless 90% of the time. I just like the simplicity of being able to get up and go in the morning and at night eat and go to sleep.

Stoveless also makes resupplying a bit easier IMO. I can last a few days on pringles and candy bars from a convenient store, but if someone is used to mountain houses, ect they'll have a bit of a harder time resupplying.

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Re "Going Stoveless - Cold Food for Thought" on 07/02/2013 12:19:57 MDT Print View

Nice article Pmags. Is that the LCW High Route in that pic? I tried it last year but got driven off by a thunderstorm. I decided to bail down to the CT and when I walked over to take a look down, I could see my car directly below in the Long Gulch TH parking. That was convenient. Would like to try again when my knee heals up. It was really cool.

I've only done stoveless on 1-2 night trips so far. It seems like I'd get tired of cold couscous or potatoes pretty fast and foods that don't require rehdydration would be considerably heavier for a week long trip.

A friend got me started bring subs along on trips that start on a Friday evening. If I get a large I can have half for dinner and half for breakfast.

I love PBJ tortillas on the trail. Funny that you can buy small packets of peanut butter at the store but not jelly. I'm not big on peanut butter by itself.

Thanks for the ideas.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
PBJ and PBH on 07/02/2013 12:36:07 MDT Print View

Randy,

You can score single-serving jam and jelly at breakfast restaurants (sitting in a wire rack on the table), and at hotels serving a free breakfast. They aren't in the completely flexible pouch PB is, but honey is - PB and honey being another variation.

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Re: Jelly on 07/02/2013 12:50:14 MDT Print View

Oh no David! Get ready for another round of the ethics of taking extra packets debate! :)

That is where I get mine. I usually just take the ones they give me with my breakfast.

I used to do peanut butter and honey on bread when I bike toured as a kid. Not sure why I haven't done that backpacking.

PBB (peanut butter and banana) is my my favorite but bananas don't travel well.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
PBB on 07/02/2013 13:00:39 MDT Print View

PBB: How about those fried banana chips? Often found in the bulk, "health food" section. It would make a crunchy sandwich or you could do it "chips and dip" style. I avoid them in town as needlessly caloric, but on the trail . . .

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: PBJ and PBH on 07/02/2013 13:04:48 MDT Print View

Minimus.biz also sells single serving jelly packets.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Stepping in poo on 07/02/2013 13:07:46 MDT Print View

Just to head off a collision.... The ethics debate has been had.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/xdpy/forum_thread/37830/index.html

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Stoveless on 07/02/2013 13:33:21 MDT Print View

Yep, that's the debate I was referring to. That was a LOT of fun.

Thanks Doug. I'll check that out.

I do eat those banana chips David. Never occurred for me to try them with the PB. Good idea.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
LCW on 07/02/2013 14:16:53 MDT Print View

>>Is that the LCW High Route in that pic?

Indeed it is! Great little route.

As for saving weight, I do it as much for simplicity as weight savings. Sometimes, esp by myself, I just want throw down my sleeping pad, sack out and eat.

OTOH, sometimes, esp during the later part of Fall, I absolutely want a hot meal.

Good to have choices!

Edited by PaulMags on 07/02/2013 14:18:10 MDT.

Sharon J.
(squark) - F

Locale: SF Bay area
bananas on 07/02/2013 14:17:08 MDT Print View

or how about Trader Joe's flattened bananas? If you prefer chewy to crunchy.

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
TJs on 07/02/2013 16:05:03 MDT Print View

Hey! No taunting the Trader Joe-less! We're finally getting 2 in Colorado, 1 in Denver and 1 in Boulder. Because or of our bizarre liquor laws, only 1 will sell alcohol. I haven't heard any updates of when they are opening but supposed to be sometime this year. I'll definitely check out those flattened bananas.

Paul Magnanti
(PaulMags) - MLife

Locale: People's Republic of Boulder
TJs on 07/02/2013 23:22:02 MDT Print View

Mrs Mags is ecstatic over TJs opening here in Boulder.

She lived a few years in Flagstaff and became an ardent fan of them.

Plus TJs is owned by a German company and apparently TJs stocks some specialty items that she could only get back in the Aldi markets in Germany (Same company).

To make this thread related, I suspect Mrs Mags will be a regular customer of TJs. She'll be stocking some cool food I can bring on my stoveless backpacks! :)

Edited by PaulMags on 07/02/2013 23:23:13 MDT.

Brian Mix
(Aggro) - M

Locale: Western slope, Sierra Nevada
word swap? on 07/05/2013 11:02:42 MDT Print View

In your article, below the iced coffed picture the next title is "Some food choices for going stoveless". It seems to me the question naturally asked would be "What FOOD should I bring?"
Did a smart device swap words on you?