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Guyline options
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Sean Passanisi
(passanis) - MLife
Guyline options on 06/17/2013 13:14:55 MDT Print View

Hey all,

I'm looking to purchase guyline for my TarpTent and to keep for general use. I know TarpTents use Kelty Triptease Lightline Guyline (http://www.kelty.com/p-136-triptease-lightline.aspx).

What is the difference between that product and Zpacks Spectra Cord (http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/spectra_cord.shtml) or BlueWater 3mm NiteLine Utility Cord (http://www.rei.com/product/782824/bluewater-3mm-niteline-utility-cord-package-of-50-ft)?

Thanks.

Jolly Green Giant
(regultr) - MLife

Locale: www.jolly-green-giant.blogspot.com
Re: Guyline options on 06/17/2013 13:21:10 MDT Print View

Try this instead. It doesn't reflect, but it is tiny, thin, lightweight, strong and doesn't bunch up.

http://litetrail.com/shop/litetrail-gline-polyester-dyneema-guyline-cord

John Holmes
(jcholmes)

Locale: SouthEastern US
Triptease on 06/17/2013 13:21:32 MDT Print View

I've used every size/weight/material guy line out there from pure spectra to nylon sheath to paracord to whatever. Recently decided that trip tease works as well as anything, holds a knot better than spectra and LOVE the glow from my headlamp. I just got really tired of tripping (or having my camp mates trip) over my guylines.

Chad B
(CenAZwalker) - F

Locale: Southwest
Re: Re: Guyline options on 06/17/2013 13:39:19 MDT Print View

I have always been content with the TripTease but just ordered some of the Gline from LiteTrail yesterday.

Chad "Stick" Poindexter
(Stick) - F

Locale: Wet & Humid Southeast....
GLine or GloWire on 06/17/2013 13:52:46 MDT Print View

If I just want some lightweight line and plan to use knots I use the GLine from LiteTrail. However, if I want something that glows and I can use with the LineLock3's then I go with Lawson Klines GloWire. I highly recommend them both, plus it supports the little guys.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Guyline options on 06/17/2013 17:23:12 MDT Print View

I don't know what the breaking strength of 3 mm Bluewater is, but I suspect it is close to 100 (one hundred) times stronger than the tent could ever withstand. Overkill much?

Some of us have been using 0.5 mm Spectra for years, without breakage. In bad weather.

Cheers

Ryan Smith
(ViolentGreen) - F

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: Guyline options on 06/17/2013 18:03:37 MDT Print View

The Bluewater rope has a 500 lbs breaking strength rating.

+1 for Lawson's line. It is great stuff.

Ryan

Edited by ViolentGreen on 06/17/2013 18:04:13 MDT.

Michael K
(chinookhead) - F - M
Lawson's knots? on 06/17/2013 19:04:02 MDT Print View

I was also thinking about Lawson's glowire to avoid the tripping issue with the lines. How does it hold knots? I don't get why Big Agnes uses glow black line (with little white spots.....in the day I and camp mates run into it.

J R
(JRinGeorgia) - F
holds knots just fine on 06/17/2013 19:12:44 MDT Print View

Lawson's glowire hold knots fine for me.

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
glowire on 06/17/2013 20:02:55 MDT Print View

Lawsons glowire slipped using lineloc 3s for me when used as a tarp ridgeline. This was maybe two years ago so maybe something has changed.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: glowire on 06/17/2013 20:35:50 MDT Print View

"Lawsons glowire slipped using lineloc 3s for me when used as a tarp ridgeline"

Glowire is 2.38mm

A LineLock 3 usually needs 2.5 to 3 mm, depending on the construction and coating, for good a solid lock.

Zpack's 2.5 will usually work because it is so stiff. So stiff that it difficult for me to adjust.

I use a 3mm for no-fuss setups.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Guyline options on 06/18/2013 04:38:49 MDT Print View

All the lines you mention are too large for good tarp/tent guy lines. the lightest line for the task is good enough. I agree with Roger. Heavyier lines, 100+pound test lines, are a bit of overkill and can actually rip a tarp if solidly mountedp, say to a tree or large rock. I would rather the line broke (an inconvenience) rather than damage the tarp.

Generally, a short length of braided fishing line is all I need. 6" for the ridge line and a few 2' sections. This has *some* stretch, so it helps when pulling a tarp fairly tight.

Sometimes I need to do a surgeons knot and use a loop-to-loop connection of a line is too short. Two or three sections can be used to join into a 10' line for those areas without trees.

Fairly stiff in higher tests (say 50pound test) it stays relativly knot free. Often just wrapping it in your hand will avoid most wind knots. As far as visibility goes, I have learned over a few years about where the lines are. I don't really need bright lines. If they weigh .25oz for the whole tarp, I would be surprised. I usually carry an extra hank in my ditty bag, maybe 50' or so. This is may weigh as much as a half ounce, but I never really weighed it...it varies by trip. And it is pretty cheap. Knotting can be difficult, but I simply use a couple loops. I do not adjust lines except by pulling a stake and replanting it. It is quicker than fiddling with knots.

I use heavier line for bear bags. But this is more to protect against sawing into a branch than anything.

Spectra is good line, perhaps too good. I feel a lighter line won't damage the tarp or tent, though. Heavy fishing line works well for my needs.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Guyline options on 06/18/2013 06:49:44 MDT Print View

"All the lines you mention are too large for good tarp/tent guy lines."

Bear in mind that if we are still talking about LineLock3s then a concession is being made to weight for easy of use.

If you add freezing rain or snow, and fingers that don't work well in the cold, a 3mm line on a LineLock starts to look pretty good.

If you camp where "stacked rocks" are the only why to hold your shelter down, the extra material gives you a bit of a buffer against pinch-cuts.

If you don't like tripping over your lines at night, the reflective strips are a nice to have.

If you don't like untangling a mess of 0.5 mm line then bigger looks better.

And what Is the weight difference between 50 feet of 1mm versus 3mm?

YMMV

Edited by greg23 on 06/18/2013 06:52:01 MDT.

spelt with a t
(spelt) - F

Locale: SW/C PA
Re: Guyline options on 06/18/2013 07:47:07 MDT Print View

The worst part of fishing is fiddling with fishing line. Why would I introduce that annoyance to camping, too?

Edit: OP, I like glowire. Not all of my guylines use linelocs, but for the ones that do I've experienced no slippage.

Edited by spelt on 06/18/2013 07:49:13 MDT.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Re: Re: Guyline options on 06/18/2013 08:15:46 MDT Print View

Greg, you'r right. Not everyone likes the light stuff. 50' of .5mm, 50# line wighs about a third of an ounce, or 10g. The short 18" sections (after tying the loops) are likely less than one gram and still likely too strong for the tarp.

I don't use line locks. I use loop to stake, pull and replant, as necessary.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Guyline options on 06/18/2013 08:28:44 MDT Print View

"I don't use line locks. I use loop to stake, pull and replant, as necessary."

I've heard other people say that too.

Where I camp, it's often hard to find a place where I can get a stake to go in, I can't just plant it where I want. And if I finally get a stake in, I don't want to have to move it to take up slack. Nice to be able to adjust length of guyline.

Mole J
(MoleJ) - F

Locale: UK
Re: Guyline options on 06/18/2013 08:38:58 MDT Print View

The worst part of fishing is fiddling with fishing line. Why would I introduce that annoyance to camping, too?

+1 I really don't see the point of such thin line - it's not like you'll save a significant weight and just get potential tangling issues (and it can cut into things) - I gave up on using 1.5mm dyneema due to regular tangles - the mind boggles at using 0.5mm line - maybe I'm clumsy, but I'd go crazy!


I don't use line locks. I use loop to stake, pull and replant, as necessary.

Not really possible in many places I camp due to rocky soil - sometimes the peg (stake!) has to go in just the one place.

I do use lineloc 3's on a couple shelters, but in my experience, line under 3mm (e.g. the stuff Tarptent supplies with the Scarp!)can slip in wet n windy weather. I now put a slip hitch on them once tight in rough weather.
sorry about the other posts - some sort of glitch in BPL software?!

Edited by MoleJ on 06/18/2013 08:48:43 MDT.

Chad "Stick" Poindexter
(Stick) - F

Locale: Wet & Humid Southeast....
GloWire slipping in Lineloc3's on 06/18/2013 18:15:24 MDT Print View

I have never experienced the GloWire slipping in the LineLoc3's, although I have read about others saying they have. Due to this, if the weather is bad and I will be expecting high winds, I can just throw a half hitch in behind it and it is good to go.

Sean Passanisi
(passanis) - MLife
Thank you on 06/19/2013 10:50:32 MDT Print View

Thanks for all of the feedback. I'm leaning towards the Kelty Triptease Lightline Guyline since the product is the OEM on the Tarptent. But I will look at the Lawson glowire.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Guyline options on 06/20/2013 04:34:21 MDT Print View

> If you don't like untangling a mess of 0.5 mm line then bigger looks better.
Theory, and practice.
Funny thing is, I've been using 0.5 mm kite line for nearly a decade now, and just I don't see tangles.

Cheers

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
My guyline for TT Moment and Scarp 2 on 06/20/2013 19:38:08 MDT Print View

I use Kelty Triptease with a LineLoc tensioner at one end and a small polymer clip (from Tarptent) on the tent end.

This way I can always clip them in quickly if an unexpected storm comes up. Normally they are stored in the bottom of my tent bag. But they always go with me, to be used as a clothesline if necessary.

BTW, the small polymer clip is strong enough for most winds but may break in extreme (over 75 mph.) gusts, which is OK B/C better the clips break than my tent.
But at over 75 mph winds I'll be inside the tent assuming the "apocalypse position" (i.e bent over, grabbing my ankles and kissing my ass good-bye).

Edited by Danepacker on 06/20/2013 19:45:45 MDT.

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Kelty Triptease on 06/26/2013 11:54:31 MDT Print View

Its been years since I owned any Kelty Triptease so I recently purchased some to compare it against my Glowire cord. Kind of like R&D Testing. Here is what I found. The Kelty Triptease weighs 1.39oz per 50' and has a diameter of 2.15mm. So everything you have read about it being 1.00oz per 50' and having a diameter of 3.00mm is wrong.

Now it could be that this cord is braided in china, but the reflective tracers in the Triptease braid are unbalanced and stick out past the nylon yarns. I am not sure if this is a mistake in their braiding process or someones bad idea to make the cord more reflective. BUT instead of placing the abrasion load evenly on the 14 nylon yarns and the 2 reflective tracers, the abrasion load is concentrated on the 2 reflective tracers. This means the cord will not last as long as it could.. Especially when used with LineLoc 3's.

That said, I tested my Glowire cord against the Kelty Triptease in the LineLoc 3's and found that due to its smaller diameter and being less round it doesns't work as good. The reflective tracers in the Triptease also get hung up and break. Again due to the unblananced weave. To top it all off, the Triptease is made in China and costs more then my Glowire cord.

Since I am biased. If anyone else is interested in testing the two together and reporting back here, I would be more than happy to send you some of each.

Thanks,
Lawson

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Guyline options on 06/27/2013 12:19:49 MDT Print View

I have used thin fishing line, masons line, ... and on to 3mm line.

I personally don't want reflective line. Stealth is often a goal if I am near roads, campgrounds or close to the trail. Being stealth gives more options as to where I can camp.

I do find line that is 1mm or less is hard to work with, especially in the cold.

2 or 3mm may be way overkill when it comes to strength, but with the thicker line I can just throw everything in my pack without major tangles when I tear down camp.

Sometimes you just want to get hiking as fast as possible, like when it is too cold to hang around.