What to do when encountering dogs on the trail?
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Dena Kelley
(EagleRiverDee) - M

Locale: Eagle River, Alaska
"What to do when encountering dogs on the trail?" on 06/17/2013 12:24:23 MDT Print View

Yep, I recall last year's thread on this and how nasty it got. Suffice it to say, as a dog owner, I keep my dog leashed unless I am absolutely certain I am alone. I often hike in very remote mountain ridgelines where I have miles of view to see people or animals and so can safely turn my dog loose, but if I'm in an area where people are likely to be I keep my dog leashed. And I pick up after my dog and carry it out. It's a pet peeve of mine to see people not deal with their dog's waste, and of course pet owners should keep their dogs under control at all times. Not all people like dogs, and shouldn't have to deal with other people's dogs even when they're friendly, and especially if they aren't.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 12:37:56 MDT Print View

"The question: What do you do when a dog is much closer to you than its owner (off leash), and it is possibly acting aggressively towards you? Assume it's just you, no friends around you."

Well, maybe just skip the philosophy, psychology, morality, etc. and answer the frikken question....
...otherwise ship this thread to chaff.

Edited by greg23 on 06/17/2013 12:40:01 MDT.

Tipi Walter
(TipiWalter) - F
Dogs on 06/17/2013 12:38:11 MDT Print View

Dena---That's funny. I've run up on some massive turds right on the trail and figure it's gotta be a human turd but the giveaway is that there's no paper around; so it's a dang healthy dog.

Edited by TipiWalter on 06/17/2013 12:52:59 MDT.

Roger Dodger
(RogerDodger) - F

Locale: Wess Siide
Re: Dogs on 06/17/2013 12:46:13 MDT Print View

Tipi,

no TP is your clue it's not a human and it's a dog?

How do you know it's not mike mcclelland, hahah. He's a grass, stone, snow and pinecone decorator. hahaha

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 12:50:08 MDT Print View

Greg,

Just so I'm absolutely clear, your offerings of philosophy, psychology, morality, etc are ok but not for anyone else because?

I think the point that a couple of us made is that an aggressive dog may not look all that aggressive.

Have a super duper day sunshine.

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Barking.... on 06/17/2013 12:55:33 MDT Print View

From my experience dogs , when away from home, will bark and act intimidating when they sense fear, because our fear makes them feel like there is something to be afraid of.
Just recently, at work, there was a loose pit bull with a servicedog vest ( yeah right...). Owner sleeping on a bench. The dog chased off a student. I walked up to talk to the owner. The dog ran at me barking and jumping. Had it been pretty much another breed I would have yelled at it to get the F@$& away from me, which has always worked wjhen they act aggressively, and not at home. Being that it was a pit bull, I failed to convince it that I was calm and reassured. My insides were shaking and I knew the dog knew and there was this vicious cycle. The owner approached so very slowly, which bothered me but I know that it reassured his dog.
Anyway, long story....all ended well thankfully.
I own a dog and have owned many throughout the years. Have been on both ends of the situation, with a barking Aussie puppy of mine jumping around someone that screamed in fear. I knew that if they only chilled out it would end immediately, but fear is fear and nothing good can come of that.
Some dogs are easier and nicer off leash, but on the trail it can upset people so I don't do that.

Wht about off leash bears??? Maybe we should sue the state ....
;) (really)

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
OP on 06/17/2013 12:58:18 MDT Print View

Oh, to answer OP..
If they act nice/ ignore you, do the same.
If they come at you barking and jumping a bit , I would act the way they tell you to do with a mountain lion. Plus yell at them to get the F away, as calmly as you can.

Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
re: OP on 06/17/2013 13:06:27 MDT Print View

I'll probably have to practice yelling calmly, Kat. I'm not quite sure how one does that, or what it would sound like. Is it like loudly whispering until your throat hurts?

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 13:09:10 MDT Print View

I carry Spray Shield (citronella spray) when I have a dog with me, which is almost always. Haven't used it yet but a dog trainer recommended it to me. Almost used it last week walking near my house when a new dog that is on an invisible fence bolted right through it after stopping at it the previous times we saw him. But he stopped short when I yelled at him and ended up following us at a distance for a quarter mile or so until he gave up.

I don't carry it if I don't have a dog along. I'm more worried about my dogs getting attacked than I am about myself. I went on two trips last year without a dog and both times had a dog charge me. Each time I instinctively crossed my trekking poles so they were facing the dog like the dog's neck would hit the x if it kept coming. Both times the dogs stopped immediately. Not sure if that was just lucky or what.

Eli Zabielski
(ezabielski) - F

Locale: Boulder, CO
Re: re: OP on 06/17/2013 13:22:48 MDT Print View

"I'll probably have to practice yelling calmly, Kat. I'm not quite sure how one does that, or what it would sound like. Is it like loudly whispering until your throat hurts?"

Really? You just speak loudly and assertively. Some people would consider this yelling.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: re: OP on 06/17/2013 13:36:54 MDT Print View

"Really? You just speak loudly and assertively. Some people would consider this yelling."

Eli, I suspect you've never been married.

Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
re: OP on 06/17/2013 13:37:02 MDT Print View

Hmmm...speaking loudly and assertively, or yelling? That doesn't quite fit my idea of "calm." But I get it, Eli, I really do.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 13:52:13 MDT Print View

I prefer immediately mounting the offending dog to show alpha dominance.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 13:58:21 MDT Print View

"I prefer immediately mounting the offending dog to show alpha dominance."

How does one go about mounting a Min Pin? :)

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
Ok fine "yelling" on 06/17/2013 14:03:13 MDT Print View

Yeah fine, not my first language...
Speak out loudly and calmly.

Now tell me what you call it if you say fairly loudly and assertively to get the F@&$ away from you!!,
I would feel yelled at, but I am sensitive, so..

Edited by Kat_P on 06/17/2013 14:05:44 MDT.

Lyan Jordan
(redmonk)

Locale: Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 14:19:42 MDT Print View

tell me what you call it if you say fairly loudly and assertively to get the F@&$ away from you!!,

I hate blind dates.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 14:26:22 MDT Print View

"I prefer immediately mounting the offending dog to show alpha dominance."

Nostril launched coffee and keyboards don't mix.

Edward Zwibel
(YetiEddie) - MLife

Locale: Sunny San Diego
@nick on 06/17/2013 14:36:17 MDT Print View

Reference the min pin....just don't lead em as much.

Sharon J.
(squark) - F

Locale: SF Bay area
Re: Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 20:29:42 MDT Print View

"I'm of the opinion with my very limited experience that dogs will stop barking/growling when they have committed to attack. If they are still barking or growling, I feel that they are giving me a courtesy warning. "

Absolutely. From a trainer's blog

"All of that lunging and barking is their way of saying, “Stay away from me! Don’t make me come over there!” In truth, they don’t want to come over there. What they want is for the scary thing to vanish into oblivion, preferably yesterday. But think about this: if a dog really meant to attack, he would. The lunging, barking dog is spending precious energy on a display that, if heeded, will actually avoid conflict. But if a dog is very still, staring, body fairly humming with tension, he’s conserving his energy. That is a dog who should cause the hairs on your own neck to stand up, because he might very well attack."

more here:
https://wildewmn.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/the-threat-of-stillness/

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: What to do when encountering dogs on the trail? on 06/17/2013 20:37:35 MDT Print View

"I prefer immediately mounting the offending dog to show alpha dominance."

We will NEVER hike toge...... oh, dog. Ummmmmm, never mind, we're good.....