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Lightweight tent for Scottish Highlands?
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nian zhang
(thotwielder) - F
Voyager Ultra 2 Tent on 06/19/2013 07:34:24 MDT Print View

Since you are in Scotland why not try latest Voyager Ultra 2 Tent from Terra Nova. Classic semi geodesic tent guarantees least flapping in high wind and four season use. And it weights only 2 lbs! I am in UK as well and been to Scotland many times so I know what the weather there is like. 100 mph wind just too common. 24 hours rain can last couple of days. Many highly praised ultra light items and concepts here is just a joke there. Personally, I have lost a Big agnes and Shangri-la 3 tent in Scotland. Shangri la 3 had the pole broken in 100 mph wind. Big agnes got main pole seriously bent but that's because we (my wife and me) sit in the tent whole night using our backs to hold the tent!

Personally, I will try not to camp above tree lines in Scotland. Even if your tent can survive you will not sleep well. Instead always find some lower place, best with some kind of shelters from wind. If I have to I will bring a bomb proof winter tent (like the semi geodesic or geodesic tent, or some winter tunnel tents ). But none of them will be light. So Voyager Ultra 2 Tent from Terra Nova will be very good candidate if the price is not an issue.

marc D
(mareco) - M

Locale: Scotland
Voyager Ultra 2 Tent on 06/19/2013 11:05:09 MDT Print View

"Personally, I have lost a Big agnes and Shangri-la 3 tent in Scotland. Shangri la 3 had the pole broken in 100 mph wind. Big agnes got main pole seriously bent but that's because we (my wife and me) sit in the tent whole night using our backs to hold the tent!"

Sorry to hear about your experiences in Scotland Nian, but I had to laugh. It sounds all too familiar.

Voyager Ultra 2 Tent. The tent is exactly what I am looking for. A 3 pole semi-geodesic at under 1kg. Pack size is not too bad either.

The price, £1100. I would need to be pretty sure that its going to perform before paying that. That's 2 Hillebergs, or 4 Tarptents. I cant seem to find any reviews for this one though, perhaps they havent sold that many.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Voyager Ultra 2 Tent on 06/19/2013 11:39:01 MDT Print View

Marc,

How about the standard superlite voyager, or the Lightwave semi geos.

Be careful though as there flat roofs can cause issues with snow accumulation.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Notch & Moment DW on 06/19/2013 11:41:27 MDT Print View

Sean,

See the PM I sent you for more details.

The Notch is rated as 3-4 season because it has an optional ripstop inner for winter.

The Moment DW will soon have that option and I'm sure Tarptent will re-classify it as a 3-4 season tent. I know I'm going to use it with that new inner on winter solo trips.


BTW, I notice Tracksterman mantioned that the hem of the original Moment was not low enough. That's easily solved either by digging a 3" to 4" hole to recieve each end of the main hoop pole ends or, better yet, shortening the pole by about 6 inches for a 3 inch drop on each side.

Edited by Danepacker on 06/19/2013 11:51:19 MDT.

marc D
(mareco) - M

Locale: Scotland
Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 15:26:41 MDT Print View

I wasnt familiar with the Superlite Voyager, but have just read some mixed reviews, which may apply to all the Voyagers.

It seems to be a bit on the short side, with 6 footers saying its tight. I am 6ft2 so might struggle.

Some users have said that the poles are free to slide about under the flysheet and as a result when the wind hits it you get the "vacuum packed to the ground" effect.

The killer for me though is that it needs to be pitched inner first. I stopped using tents like that years ago and would never use one again in Scotland. Staking out the corners and feeding the poles through sleeves in the flysheet, like on the Hillebergs, gives you a fighting chance of getting into a dry inner tent. It looks like all the Tarptents that use poles work this way too.

A pity, because otherwise they seem like good tents and are a good weight.

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
Lightweight tent for Scottish Highlands? on 06/19/2013 15:38:02 MDT Print View

Some users have said that the poles are free to slide about under the flysheet

That's why I would not choose this design again. Had one get badly bent out of shape in strong winds here in NZ.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 15:39:48 MDT Print View

Marc,

At your height and prerequisite for outer pitch first I would look at the Unna, I have just purchased one to replace a Soulo I found too short.

marc D
(mareco) - M

Locale: Scotland
Notch & Moment DW on 06/19/2013 15:45:17 MDT Print View

Eric

That's a good idea with shortening the pole to lower the flysheet hem. Carry a short sleeved section of pole with you and you can easily lengthen the pole again in a couple of minutes if you want to.

How would this work with an inner tent in the Moment though. Would there still be enough clearance between the inner and the fly?

marc D
(mareco) - M

Locale: Scotland
Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 16:05:42 MDT Print View

Stephen

Have you had a chance to try the Unna out yet?

Any insights would be appreciated.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 16:40:37 MDT Print View

Hi Marc,

It is still in transit, it came highly recommended from folk on both sides of the pond.

Check out Ken Thompson's review who hangs out here.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/reviews/display_reviews.html?forum_thread_id=63999

Ross L
(Ross) - MLife

Locale: Beautiful BC
Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 18:41:30 MDT Print View

Marc

IMO you need a true and tested mountaineering tent for the wind conditions you may encounter. Anything lesser is courting disaster. The Integral Designs MK11 Lite (Expedition Series) is worthy of your consideration.

http://www.integraldesigns.com/product.cfm?id=34&CFID=10084553&CFTOKEN=7e40847f27400e8b-B588D8CB-C702-F49A-A2C811FA69F3A77B&mainproducttypeid=15

2004 Ryan Jordan review of an earlier version:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/integral_designs_mk1lite_event_tent_review.html#.UcJZL_drbIU

Edited by Ross on 06/19/2013 19:23:47 MDT.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 19:23:28 MDT Print View

Just make sure to get the optional vestibule.

Matt Dirksen
(NamelessWay) - MLife

Locale: Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/19/2013 20:37:00 MDT Print View

If the optional vestibule seems too heavy, perhaps just cut and modify a piece of cuben to buckle in. When I use my bibler, I find myself only "needing" to hook the vestibule up half the time. Fortunately, the tent does not "need" the vestibule to deflect wind.

(As I might have mentioned before.)
+1 on the Integral Designs/Bibler double pole tents, btw. You aren't taking a risk with that particular type of design.

As far as the Voyager goes, I'd be cautious about a very expensive tent with zero reviews, even if its lighter than its respective counterparts. It's modified geodesic design reminds me of the old North Face Tadpole/Bullfrog design of the mid eighties. That particular design was a good three season shape at its time, but was never considered a four season shape, due to its inability to shed snow.

Besides, "If its too good to be true, it probably is."

Matt

marc D
(mareco) - M

Locale: Scotland
Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/20/2013 10:22:57 MDT Print View

Thanks to everyone for the advice.

I think it has to be a 2 tent solution, rather than carry a heavier tent that will work all year round.

The Tarptent Moment (or possibly Hilleberg Unna) for most of the year, and one of the smaller Integral Designs for camping out on summits and winter use.

Interesting that Ryan Jordan said there was no structural deformation of the Mk1Lite in 60 mph winds, that is really what I am lookng for. Its not the noise of the fabric that bothers me, more the tent almost slapping you in the face.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/20/2013 10:38:40 MDT Print View

I say the Unna would be fine all year round, if you wanted only 1 tent.

I like the option of two though.

Edited by stephenm on 06/20/2013 10:43:34 MDT.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Re: Re: Re: Unna tent on 06/20/2013 11:14:35 MDT Print View

Take a look at http://thunderinthenight.blogspot.dk/2013/06/two-wheel-drive.html and https://vimeo.com/68646423 in particular around 1:30

For me if I did not have a Tarptent Moment DW I would seriously consider an Unna

Brendan Howe
(weeman) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/20/2013 11:34:12 MDT Print View

Check out this video of the Rab Summit tent being setup in front of a wind machine. This tent is the same as the older model Integral Designs MK1 Lite:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJWGe2ShgR4

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/20/2013 11:43:27 MDT Print View

any of those will be way too short for Marc.

marc D
(mareco) - M

Locale: Scotland
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Voyager Tent on 06/20/2013 12:53:53 MDT Print View

My last couple of tents have been great for length, but I couldnt sit up in them. Trying to put socks on felt like Houdini.

I like the look of the Unna when its fully opened up at the front, and not using the inner, like on the Thunderinthenight blog. I could maybe get away with not carrying the inner if the weather was half decent in the summer. It would need some kind of mesh screen across the front though to keep out most of the midges. The fly seems to go all the way to the ground, which is good.

One thing you never really get in reviews is how long a tent will last before failing, or rather, how many storms can it go through before failing and when it does fail, how does it fail. Is it going to be sudden and catostrophic or will you notice gradual weakening. A lot of people rave about how well their tent stood up in a storm, one storm, but is it going to do that the next time, or the time after? Especially with the ultralight stuff. These are things I think about when lying on a rocky ledge several thousand feet up.

Roger B
(rogerb) - MLife

Locale: Here and there
Re: Failure on 06/20/2013 13:22:15 MDT Print View

Everything fails in the end. IMHO you need to inspect your gear after every trip before you take it on the next trip to ensure that it is storm worthy. My feeling is that a Hilleberg will last quite a while before it fails. Tarptents and other lightweight gear will not fail you on a trip if you look after them and inspect them before you leave. I am happily taken a Tarptent Moment DW to Lapland this summer and expect to take it for a few years to come.