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how to cut coffee weight
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Martin Ellenberger
(martellenberger) - M
how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 03:45:31 MDT Print View

I'm looking to see what everyone uses for their coffee setups to see if I can cut some ounces off mine. I use a plastic French press mug, it weighs 8oz and I don't have to carry anything other than that and my cook pot.

John Abela
(JohnAbela) - MLife
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 03:56:09 MDT Print View

(looks both ways, ducks and covers)

starbucks via

Philip Marshall
(philthy) - MLife
you probably want to read this on 06/09/2013 05:09:23 MDT Print View

Mike Clelland's article on backpacking coffee techniques.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/coffee_beautiful_cup.html#.UbRhyRaTBhA

Unfortunately this was written before Starbucks Via was on the market - I think it is my preferred trail coffee method when camping with 1 or 2. When camping in bigger groups I'll think about bringing a proper coffee brewing method

Peter S (masc. über linear logical club)
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
+1 VIA on 06/09/2013 05:22:23 MDT Print View

No comparison.

Only downside is the price.

It reminds me of Esbit vs Alcohol. Esbit is the best, but it's expensive.

Jennifer Mitol
(Jenmitol) - M

Locale: In my dreams....
Trader joes!!!! on 06/09/2013 06:08:12 MDT Print View

Makes an awesome instant coffee single, packaged just like the via, but includes cream and sugar!! For those of us who partake in such blasephemy, of course...

$2 for 10. Love them!!!

John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: The SouthWest
Re: trader joes on 06/09/2013 06:22:14 MDT Print View

The Trader Joes instant coffee is more cream than coffee - far too weak for me. Go with Via or Via Iced!

John Whynot
(jdw01776)

Locale: Southeast Texas
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 06:35:32 MDT Print View

Community Instant Dark Roast, repackaged into a flip-top plastic container. It's good coffee, and no extra trash from single-serve packets, just add to hot water in my cook pot.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: coffee weight on 06/09/2013 07:04:46 MDT Print View

Via is crap. It's main redeeming feature is that it's not bad cold, and thus good for light and fast and/or no cook trips.

If you're taking the time to make hot coffee do it right and make cowboy coffee. Lots of espresso grounds in cold water, just boil, let sit, tap to settle, pour.

Gary Dunckel
(Zia-Grill-Guy) - MLife

Locale: Boulder
Via on 06/09/2013 07:26:29 MDT Print View

Ah, you're coffee snob, Dave. Via is fine. I buy several 6-packs of Starbucks' Christmas blend when they sell them at half price in early February. That sets me up for the summer, on the cheap. Not quite as tasty as the Italian Via, but affordable.

Pete Staehling
(staehpj1) - F
Coffee on 06/09/2013 07:39:42 MDT Print View

The best way to cut weight on coffee is to just forgo it. That is my usual approach for the backcountry. It has the benefit that when I get to towns along the way or get back home the coffee tastes so good!

When I do bother with coffee in the back country I take Via and think it is fine. I am normally a Charbucks hater, but think Via is good. Different strokes though.

BTW: For those who like cream in their coffee, Nido powder is a great substitute.

Steve Martell
(Steve) - MLife

Locale: Eastern Washington
+2 VIA on 06/09/2013 07:45:14 MDT Print View

Another vote for Starbucks VIA--better and lighter (IMHO) than all other options I've tried.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 07:53:12 MDT Print View

Cut weight elsewhere. I've seen the look on other campers faces when they all bought Via, decaf, ugh. I had real grounds and real sugar. Like hungry wolves.

Coffee is too important. Take Dave's advice.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 08:00:50 MDT Print View

Caffeinolics Anonymous!...kidding.

scree ride
(scree)
can't help on 06/09/2013 08:06:40 MDT Print View

I use an Aeropress.
8.3 ounces with a metal filter. Excellent coffee with hot, not boiling, water. Less fuel than cowboy coffee. Not a lot different from a traditional press. Better filtration. Much easier to clean.

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: re: coffee weight on 06/09/2013 08:55:20 MDT Print View

David Chenault > If you're taking the time to make hot coffee do it right and make cowboy coffee. Lots of espresso grounds in cold water, just boil, let sit, tap to settle, pour.

This is pretty much what what you get with the French press. Lacks a strainer but it can be worked around.

When I took coffee, I boiled water used an old yogurt cup to hold a coffee filter and strain. At the time, it didn't occur to me to not use a filter. In the end, I don't take coffee.

I haven't heard of S'bucks VIA. I don't get out much... "Tear open a pack of Starbucks VIA® coffee and you’re halfway to the magical moment that only a great cup of coffee can create."

I suppose I could carry a packet with 1st Aid stuff in case I need to wrench open a pack.

Oh, gosh. I remember Nescafe in school. Trying to mix it with hot water from a tap. Finally licking a little bit of the powder. I wish I hadn't just dredged up that memory...

Eli Zabielski
(ezabielski) - F

Locale: Boulder, CO
If it's just caffeine... on 06/09/2013 08:57:05 MDT Print View

If you are just looking for caffeine for energy or to avoid caffeine withdraw (headaches), you can use caffeine pills or Crystal Light Energy.

You can get 100 200mg caffeine pills for $6 on Amazon. This is the same amount of caffeine in 16oz of coffee. Keep in mind that most people probably regard caffeine as a diuretic, so you need to drink more water.

Crystal Light Energy packets are the same as Via packets, and weigh 2g each, with 120g of caffeine in them. This automatically helps with the diuretic effects since it's less caffeine, and mixed in with 16oz of water.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
re: coffee weight on 06/09/2013 09:16:50 MDT Print View

To get proper coffee you have to grind it just before brewing, so you should bring a grinder too.

I just use "Taster's Choice" freeze dried which is maybe not quite as bad as some other instant coffees.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
coffee storage on 06/09/2013 09:20:19 MDT Print View

I keep my grounds in a old school lexan Nalgene 4oz screw top jar. No odor gets out. Grounds stay fresh. Ziploc aint gonna work.

Richard Cullip
(RichardCullip) - M

Locale: San Diego County
Re: Coffee on 06/09/2013 09:20:23 MDT Print View

I'm with Pete. Leave it at home. Go without.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Coffee on 06/09/2013 09:20:55 MDT Print View

Savage.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: coffee storage on 06/09/2013 09:22:04 MDT Print View

Plastic absorbs odors, you really need a glass jar.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: coffee storage on 06/09/2013 09:25:22 MDT Print View

No issue with my 20 year old lexan jar. Glass, You're funny.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 09:36:49 MDT Print View

I find this to be a happy medium between drinking commie via coffee and flossing coffee grounds out of my teeth. Total weight is 1.5 oz.

I use a french press at home (wheech expleens thees reediculous accent oui oui) and find that the quality of coffee to be on par with cowboy coffee.... a french cowboy if you will.

.coffee

In all honesty I do drink freeze dried coffee and I much prefer Trader Joes to Via.

EDIT Ok so my picture quality and size needs some improvement.

Edited by IDBLOOM on 06/09/2013 09:40:00 MDT.

Daryl and Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 10:00:56 MDT Print View

I add it (any freeze dried brand) to my granola before I leave home.

I consume coffee for the caffeine. Don't care about the taste.

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: If it's just caffeine... on 06/09/2013 10:18:08 MDT Print View

> You can get 100 200mg caffeine pills for $6 on Amazon. This is the same amount of caffeine in 16oz of coffee.

Each pill provides the same amount of caffeine..?
(The effects of 100x200 would make the paper)
:^)

I didn't know about the Crystal stuff.
Still need to get out more.

Edited by Tan68 on 06/09/2013 10:27:42 MDT.

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 10:19:07 MDT Print View

The image of Tanner, trembling fingers, tearing open the Nescafe packet to lick the dust... not that we love our coffee!

My wife and I roast our own coffee at home and I really like a cup of "Vitamin C" in the morning, although I am a cream & sugar guy. For backpacking, we've found the "everything tastes better at altitude" thing to apply to coffee as well (ever try MH meals at home?) and we've tried several different methods of taking our own grounds with us. With all of those, I don't like the mess or the volume of grounds I have to carry -- and I am not about to bury aromatic coffee grounds.

So, we switched to freeze-dried coffee and tried Taster's Choice, Mt. Hagen, Starbucks Via and Trader Joe's. With Trader Joe's, we tried the "black" version and the cream & sugar version (black appears to be discontinued), and found it to be the best of the bunch in terms of flavor. I love the price, I love the flavor and I make it a little richer than the recipe by using a tad less water, as one might with Mountain House...

So, it's the lightweight, single-serving TRADER JOE that wins for us.

Morning coffee in the High Sierra

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re:Trader Joes on 06/09/2013 10:24:02 MDT Print View

Closet one is 150+ miles away. Good thing for the internet. I'll have to give it a go.

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 10:26:42 MDT Print View

> I find this to be a happy medium between drinking commie via coffee and flossing coffee grounds out of my teeth. Total weight is 1.5 oz.

What is it? A light, plastic press?

It is hard to judge scale, I figure it is on a chopping block surface? Although it is a bit of illusion it could be on a wooden floor !?

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Re: Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 10:30:11 MDT Print View

Tanner, I've seen that thing at REI: it's a gravity filter.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 10:35:02 MDT Print View

I'm going to have to try some of these out. Over the past decade or so I have gradually drifted into total coffee snobdom. I have an expensive espresso machine, starbucks now makes me almost literally gag, and I even started roasting my own beans a few year back.

Fortunately everything tastes better eaten outdoors. I first realized this when I was 7 and noted that PB&Js at the beach tasted much better, even with sand added, than they did inside. Strange. Anyway, I don't bemoan the fact I am drinking some sort of instant swill while backpacking - must be distracted by the scenery. I have even sunk so low as to bring carnation "international" instant coffees - you know the ones with names like "Orange Cappuccino". Ugh! *shivers uncontrollably"* I had pretty much given up on the whole issue, but you guys make we want to try some new strategies - to raise myself out of the gutter. To be a better person!

Edited by millonas on 06/09/2013 10:37:12 MDT.

Jeff Sims
(jeffreytsims) - MLife

Locale: So. Cal
I live for my coffee in the morning. on 06/09/2013 10:37:41 MDT Print View

I use the MSR coffee filter and just leave the cap at home. Without the cap the filter weighs .65 oz. (I can also use this to filter large particles from water for either the Sawyer squeeze or Steripen depending on the trip) I do carry an evernew mug that is 1.8 oz which I also use for tea at the end of the day. I grind my beans just as I leave the house and everything works out pretty good, much better than the Via stuff as I just do not like the taste of Starbucks. To each his own, but this is what works for me

http://www.campist.com/archives/msr-mugmate-coffeetea-filter.html

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re:Coffee the Redeemer on 06/09/2013 10:43:16 MDT Print View

Mark. It is not too late!

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re:Coffee the Redeemer on 06/09/2013 10:53:54 MDT Print View

I recently succumbed and bought a jetboil. I was thinking of trying out the French press attachment, but one or more of the reviewers on amazon said it sucked as a French press. Has anyone tried this, and does it work OK? Would save some weight over the aeropress. Maybe it could be modded to make it more hard core. Then I could bring my own self-roasted beans!

Christopher *
(cfrey.0) - M

Locale: US East Coast
Re: Re: If it's just caffeine... on 06/09/2013 11:00:28 MDT Print View

You gotta watch out for the Crystal lite Energy. We called it crystal crack. I don't know if it was the caffeine or the sugar or some mystery ingredient but it reduced a group of relatively able bodied thru hikers into to a bunch of night-hiking twitchy tweekers.

Edited by cfrey.0 on 06/09/2013 11:03:01 MDT.

Eli Zabielski
(ezabielski) - F

Locale: Boulder, CO
Re: Re: If it's just caffeine... on 06/09/2013 11:16:54 MDT Print View

>Each pill provides the same amount of caffeine..?
>(The effects of 100x200 would make the paper)
>:^)


Presumably, each pill is 200mg of pure caffeine (that's what the product claims). A 16oz cup of coffee has about that much caffeine.

Eli Zabielski
(ezabielski) - F

Locale: Boulder, CO
Re: Re: Re:Coffee the Redeemer on 06/09/2013 11:18:51 MDT Print View

>I was thinking of trying out the French press attachment, but one or more of the >reviewers on amazon said it sucked as a French press. Has anyone tried this, and does >it work OK?

I was pretty disappointed. The "gasket" to create a good seal between the attachment and the cup is just lame plastic that lets A LOT of grounds through. It's not like a rubber ring in most French presses.

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 11:41:48 MDT Print View

The tear and tap on tongue method uses more energy. The wrench method is direct application.

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/09/2013 11:50:57 MDT Print View

> you know the ones with names like "Orange Cappuccino". Ugh! *shivers uncontrollably"*

I drank one of those Orange kind. It was mailed to our house as a free sample/promotion. This was when 3-speed Gremlins were new. Down the road, we had to pull that thing over so I could vomit. I don't think I was otherwise sick; after clearing my gut once, I was fine.

On another note, wouldn't the pictured gravity filter serve the same purpose as a press? Both trap grounds..?

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Re: Re:Coffee the Redeemer on 06/09/2013 11:55:43 MDT Print View

So while lurking on the REI and Amazon reviews - which are unfortunately not so specific and obsessive as ones here - I have been able to determine that press from the Bodrum "8-cup" french press filter is a perfect fit for the jetboil. Now I've got my micrometer out on my jetboil and hoping I can get the measurements on the Bodrums somewhere. Perhaps that would be an ideal solution - buy a different, high quality french press and cannibalize the press portion for use in the jetboil.

At any rate, FP is the closest I'm going to get to my beloved espresso I think - unless someone know of a titanium mocha pot maker.


Edit: humm looks like inner diameter 3 3/4" on my sol ti.

Muhaha! Here is the relevant part: http://bodum.bodum.com/us/en-us/shop/detail/01-1508-16-613/

Looks at all the presses it fits! Also the filters are replaceable!

Here we go 94 mm inner diameter. Perfect. I'll try to find one to cannibalize and let you know how it works.

http://thecoffeemachinelondon.co.uk/webshop/?k=7&t=36&p=840&Produkt=Reserve%20glass%20for%208%20cup/1l%20French%20press

Edited by millonas on 06/09/2013 12:08:46 MDT.

Brian Johns
(bcutlerj) - M

Locale: NorCal
Before Via there was Pods on 06/09/2013 13:08:26 MDT Print View

For years now I have taken coffee pods and boiled two or three to make about 16-24 ounces. They work well. But SB's Via, it's just so ... well ... easy. It's the new norm. If I roasted my own beans (who has time?) I would probably bring just the screen portion of the MSR filter.

Eli Zabielski
(ezabielski) - F

Locale: Boulder, CO
Re: Re: Re: If it's just caffeine... on 06/09/2013 13:32:54 MDT Print View

>You gotta watch out for the Crystal lite Energy. We called it crystal crack. I don't know if it was the caffeine or the sugar or some mystery ingredient but it reduced a group of relatively able bodied thru hikers into to a bunch of night-hiking twitchy tweekers.


The stuff I had is 5 Calories, so there is only artificial sugar.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Crystal Light Energy ingredients on 06/09/2013 13:44:02 MDT Print View

http://www.energyfiend.com/caffeine-content/crystal-light-energy

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Before Via there was Pods on 06/09/2013 13:48:21 MDT Print View

You might be right about the MSR. I'm not sure if it would seep as well as I would want - possibly I would end up stirring the grounds for 4 minutes.

As for the via, I'm sure it is far above average, but instant is instant.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Coffee on 06/09/2013 14:44:29 MDT Print View

This contraption is called a Tea Spot. It comes with a lid which is unecessary and has been excluded from the weight which is 1.5 oz sans lid. As the name would suggest, it is designed for tea but works fine for coffee imo.

Here's a picture of it collapsed (similar to S2S collapsible cup:

.coffee collapse

Next to my SP 700 for scale:

.side by side

Seen from above. Tea spot has one scoop of coffee in it; enough for a very strong 8oz cup (forest crunchies in SP700 for added flavor):

.side by side

Steeping in 8oz of water:

.steeping

It works fine in the SP700 with up to 12oz; anything more than that you would have to hold it. The only negative against it is that it is designed for tea so the coffee grounds can clog up the holes. I just hold it for about 15-30 seconds and swirl it to allow for the coffee to drain out.

Final product quality is indistinguishable from coffee made by a French press. I'm sure there is a similar product out there made specifically for coffee that might drain better but this works fine for me so I'm not in the market to replace it.

Cole Crawford
(CDC43339) - F

Locale: Omaha
+1 caffeine tabs on 06/09/2013 15:36:08 MDT Print View

If you're not interested in the taste / coffee experience, caffeine tabs or powder is the way to go. By far the lightest solution, it's also much quicker. I take one with breakfast and then another a bit after lunch when the food coma sets in. Just make sure to always take it with some food or water because it can mess with your stomach otherwise.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: +1 caffeine tabs on 06/09/2013 16:30:49 MDT Print View

Your post reminds me of an evaluation of white chocolate I once read - "perfect for those who want the texture of chocolate, without all that intrusive flavor".


@Ian - ouch, now I want to try one of those too! Looks very packable.

Edited by millonas on 06/09/2013 16:33:02 MDT.

Andy Anderson
(ianders) - F

Locale: Southeast
Cheap funnel and some coffee filters on 06/09/2013 16:31:30 MDT Print View

Just use a cheap small funnel and put a paper filter in it. Pour hot water over the grounds. When finished, throw the filter in the fire.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Cowboy Coffee. on 06/09/2013 16:50:18 MDT Print View

It may be dirty, it may take a little skill, but it's the lightest way to get a proper cup.

Caffeine tabs? Where is the joy?

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Cheap funnel and some coffee filters on 06/09/2013 16:59:17 MDT Print View

sure, if you like drip coffee you probably have simpler options. I carried some filter around with me years ago.

As for me, if I can't get an espresso with a good head of crema I at least would want if to *seep* for several minutes a la french press, and I definitely don't want to ever filter good coffee with a paper filter which removes a lot of important stuff, and would ruin it from my perspective.

I expect the posters above who are into french press feel the same. Still if I had nothing else I would still drink drip coffee. Not sure about the pills however.

@craig I agree, I think with minor variations all the (non-drip) methods come down to the same thing (seeping, then separating the grounds), with how to separate the grounds being the only substantive difference. Mike Clelland did pretty much cover it in his article.

There is a thing called a Mocha pot that can be used on a stove or fire that does a passable impression of espresso since itis actual pressure that forces the water through the tightiy packed coffee. If I could find an ultralight version of that I'd be ecstatic. But they are heavy, complicated, and take a bit of skill to use. I'll keep it for car camping I guess.

mp

Edited by millonas on 06/09/2013 17:10:09 MDT.

Kevin B
(kedward) - F

Locale: Portland, OR
Re: Re: Cheap funnel and some coffee filters on 06/09/2013 17:36:07 MDT Print View

Paper filters aren't so bad. Just give 'em a rinse to knock off the loose fibers. French Press for me is all about convenience; you can make a big batch of solid coffee easily. A good pour-over tastes better though, in my opinion. In any event, ground coffee goes bad so fast that unless I'm carrying a grinder, I'll just drink Via. No sense in grinding up good coffee days in advance.

Peter S (masc. über linear logical club)
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
Hah!... The sound of a snob... on 06/09/2013 17:45:02 MDT Print View

All you Via haters: Maybe you're just not doing it the right way

Trust me... I'm a coffee snob in the civilization ;-)

Ken: Decaf?... Why would you even mention that hideous word! Sugar?...
Dave: You're using pregrounded, preroasted coffee...why bother with the coffee ceremony then, it's like worshipping a plastic god...

The most important thing when stuck with Via is to make a small cup. One package is for LESS than 2 dl.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Hah!... The sound of a snob... on 06/09/2013 17:50:05 MDT Print View

"when stuck with Via "

Life is full of choices. I choose to not Via

I forgot to mention creamer. A little bit of coffee with cream and sugar.

They all bought Decaf by mistake after Starbucks redesigned the package. Nobody noticed it said decaf. Hilarious.


I want more than a tiny cup of coffee. It's not Europe. This is the land of the never ending cup. Via gets way too expensive at 2-3 pkgs. per honking big cup.

Nathan Watts
(7sport) - MLife
Re: Hah!... The sound of a snob... on 06/09/2013 18:02:06 MDT Print View

Peter,

I was waiting for someone to say that. Everyone's spending a lot of effort preparing old ground coffee if they're not packing a grinder.

Also I was wondering if there are issues with seeping ground coffee at altitude. I know you need a fairly high water temp to extract properly - though that temp may be well below what's achievable up high. Can't remember.

I'm happy enough with my Via Italian roast in the backcountry for the convenience. I'll keep the French press at home.

Cole Crawford
(CDC43339) - F

Locale: Omaha
Re: Re: +1 caffeine tabs on 06/09/2013 18:02:28 MDT Print View

@Mark: Just wanted to throw it out there. It all comes down to your ultimate purpose in making coffee. I personally like coffee, but there are some people who don't like it but still want the benefits of caffeine while on the trail. It's not feasible to bring soft drinks, etc so caffeine tabs are the best bet. If your purpose is to get caffeine intake, those are the lightest, easiest solution.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: +1 caffeine tabs on 06/09/2013 18:14:03 MDT Print View

You could put a teaspoon or two of instant coffee in a granola bar or such. Maybe something with chocolate in it. You might not notice any bad taste of being instant coffee.

Alex H
(abhitt) - MLife

Locale: southern appalachians or desert SW
Italian instant espresso on 06/09/2013 18:29:22 MDT Print View

Been all around the block, filters, presses, MSR filter, Via. If I am not going to go all the way to fresh ground then the Italian Instant Espresso is the best, way better to me than Via. Ferraro is what I can get here but Medalia d' Oro is also really good.

Edited by abhitt on 06/10/2013 05:18:57 MDT.

Lachlan Fysh
(lachlanfysh) - M
Vietnamese coffee filter on 06/09/2013 18:30:03 MDT Print View

The Vietnamese use a style of drip filter / press called a phin, which will replace my aeropress for lightness. The coffee produced is short and strong and designed to be had with sweetened condensed milk (which I always have a tube of anyway :))

http://instagram.com/p/aWzIduHTsF/

Requires a smallish cup, and preferably one you can see through (to see when dripping is complete). I need to find a little plastic translucent one before I take this camping. Branded coffee is available in 2x250g bag boxes, and you use about 25 grams a hit I'd say (tablespoon or so), similar to most approaches involving grounds. Obviously you don't need to use the vietnamese coffee, anything with a medium course grind should work.

Now the important part - the whole thing is very thin aluminium, and a solo one like this weighs in at only 50g with a 100ml or so max capacity. They also do bigger ones for group use into a pot for pouring that would probably make 250ml or so (of strong espresso). You could easily cut this coffee with more water if you prefer a longer coffee...

Even looking in a very vietnamese part of town I had to shop a bit to find the solo aluminium ones - group aluminium and stainless steel solo were much more common. The stainless is marketed as being 'better' for some reason (more weight on the grounds I guess, less flavour from the metal too perhaps..), but obviously I had different priorities. Anyway, I found them in the end for $3 each :D

If anyone is interested I could probably source more, but shipping to the US would make it less cheap ;)

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Italian instant espresso on 06/09/2013 18:30:42 MDT Print View

i wondered when that stuff would be brought up. Never tried it. Should give it a go.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: Re: Hah!... The sound of a snob... on 06/09/2013 18:30:51 MDT Print View

Yaa Via is light, easy, tasty, potent enough to blow the doors offa any other system when also considering weight. Only bother is creamer. We usually buy the little single creamer sauces,but longer than a night or two its too much volume, weight, worry about popping, so we take the Trader Joes instant coffee which is much cheaper than Via and has creamer mixed in, but its less potent so we supplement it with a via packet.

We may just take Via and some flavored powder creamer.


In any case I believe that a french press+ beans, while better in quality, is not worth the weight when compared to the reasonably lower quality, but significantly lighter instant mixes. YMMV

FWIW I live in a coffeecentric area and am therefore, by default, a quasi-coffee snob, and Via gets the job done for me.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Re: Hah!... The sound of a snob... on 06/09/2013 19:16:07 MDT Print View

"Also I was wondering if there are issues with seeping ground coffee at altitude. I know you need a fairly high water temp to extract properly - though that temp may be well below what's achievable up high. Can't remember. "

Good point. Espresso, which I think needs the hottest temp of all is best with around 185-190 F. On top of Mt Whitney water boils at 185. Yes I just checked, and yes I'm worried about the fact I just checked. So fortunately we are covered in the lower 48! Hooray!

My hardcore coffee books says you *must* make your espresso within 2 minutes of grinding the beans. LOL

Also the fresh roasted beans start to loose their flavors, and oils go rancid, after 2 weeks or so. Plus you should rest the coffee a day or two after roasting or it will be a little "fizzy" - it has to outgass a bunch of CO2.

However I think grinding just before you leave on a trip, and storing properly should come up to non-snob wilderness standards.

On the other hand I have a really nice miniature Japanese-made manual grinder with a ceramic bore (6 oz) on my wish list! I expect at some point there will be an article on how to achieve the ideal grind in the field by somehow using tent stakes, a UL swiss army knife and a rock. Maybe Mike is ready for a follow up article.

John Hillyer
(TrNameLucky) - MLife
Another Option on 06/09/2013 20:26:53 MDT Print View

I make do with a couple of spoonfuls of instant each morning; but last year when I was experimenting with no cook I ate chocolate covered espresso beans.

M G
(drown) - F - MLife

Locale: Shenandoah
Re: Re: Re: If it's just caffeine... on 06/09/2013 21:10:18 MDT Print View

"You gotta watch out for the Crystal lite Energy. We called it crystal crack. I don't know if it was the caffeine or the sugar or some mystery ingredient but it reduced a group of relatively able bodied thru hikers into to a bunch of night-hiking twitchy tweekers."


My last big trip we mixed that Crystal Lite stuff with Everclear for some very special sunset cocktails.

Dena Kelley
(EagleRiverDee) - M

Locale: Eagle River, Alaska
"how to cut coffee weight" on 06/09/2013 22:41:18 MDT Print View

Another Starbucks Via user here- plus I carry a small bottle of Bailey's to kick it up a notch.

Richard Lyon
(richardglyon) - MLife

Locale: Bridger Mountains
Jetboil French Press on 06/10/2013 06:47:33 MDT Print View

Mark - I've used mine for years without a problem, at least in making very strong coffee. It is messy, as is any French press, and sometimes when I'm careless the oatmeal I hydrate immediately after has a coffee flavor. I tend to buy local roasters' strong beans and grind them at home. Best and easiest way to have strong, real coffee on a solo trip. With a group one of us will carry a plastic large FP for group coffee. Not exactly UL but there's nothing like fresh-brewed coffee on a backcountry morning.

Peter S (masc. über linear logical club)
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
ahh.. on 06/10/2013 07:19:36 MDT Print View

After a nice day with a steady intake of coffee, i'm ready to dive into this passionate thread again!

Ken: cream too?? You're pushing it now.... well, if you prefer a bowl of coffee, then i agree, too expensive for sure. I have a friend like that...I would not want to deprive him of his black bowl of morning coffee when on a hike with him...dangerously! Actually, been there myself - i used to drink almost 3 large cups of coffee each morning. Hard work to get down to one cup!
BTW...done the decaf-mistake myself one morning...not pretty..

Nathan: Somebody had to state the obvious ;-)

P.S... for me, the single cup packaging of VIA is a part of the whole ehm... package. Perfect for fastpacking, like the 4g esbit cubes.

Edited by prse on 06/10/2013 10:01:51 MDT.

Tom Lyons
(towaly) - F

Locale: Smoky Mtns.
Single serving instant on 06/10/2013 07:24:37 MDT Print View

Like others, I use single serving instant.
I don't use Starbucks Via, but I use another brand.

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Only Fresh Ground in the Sierra on 06/10/2013 09:37:11 MDT Print View

We prefer to fresh grind our home-roasted beans, using granite from the Ahwahnee formation, a Colombian pestle and the ceramic filter from recycled Jarvik 7 pumps. This, combined with cold-filtered Sierra stream water and the 7-gram french press constructed out of a RedBull can, titanium mesh and tent stake with a desmodromic ring gasket, produces the most pure essence of coffee possible.

I realize that lower forms of human may settle for less, and one of the great things about Pax Americana is that you are free to do so.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Only Fresh Ground in the Sierra on 06/10/2013 09:48:58 MDT Print View

"We prefer to fresh grind our home-roasted beans, using granite from the Ahwahnee formation, a Colombian pestle and the ceramic filter from recycled Jarvik 7 pumps. "

Excellent. I'm interested in adopting this same method, but only if it can be modded to be 10 lbs or less.

Casey Jones
(cjsbug) - F
Re: Only Fresh Ground in the Sierra on 06/10/2013 10:02:09 MDT Print View

"We prefer to fresh grind our home-roasted beans, using granite from the Ahwahnee formation, a Colombian pestle and the ceramic filter from recycled Jarvik 7 pumps. This, combined with cold-filtered Sierra stream water and the 7-gram french press constructed out of a RedBull can, titanium mesh and tent stake with a desmodromic ring gasket, produces the most pure essence of coffee possible."

Home roaster here too. I'm curious to see some pics of your setup if you have any. That sounds like quite the contraption.

Peter S (masc. über linear logical club)
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
My Dear Basil on 06/10/2013 10:10:53 MDT Print View

Now, you would not be using any thing else than Kopi Luwak beans? Otherwise don't even bother...

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: My Dear Basil on 06/10/2013 10:14:34 MDT Print View

"Now, you would not be using any thing else than Kopi Luwak beans?"

Meh, overrated. They taste like crap .... (I know, too easy.....)

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: Re: Only Fresh Ground in the Sierra on 06/11/2013 05:52:02 MDT Print View

I figured he was speaking satirically and meant he just ground his beans against whatever stone formation was at hand along the trail. Shouldn't be any need to carry the mortar. Although that leaves you at mercy of local rock... Sandstone, for instance :^| Maybe the pestle could be tied to end of a cord and used as bear defense.

>> "We prefer to fresh grind our home-roasted beans, using granite from the Ahwahnee formation, a Colombian pestle and the ceramic filter from recycled Jarvik 7 pumps. "

> Excellent. I'm interested in adopting this same method, but only if it can be modded to be 10 lbs or less.

John Almond
(FLRider) - F

Locale: The Southeast
Not Quite the 125 Cal/oz Barrier, Buut... on 06/11/2013 06:37:19 MDT Print View

...I figure instant is going to taste like, well...instant. So, enough Cafe Bustelo instant espresso (for the darker roast) to make 3 cups, mixed with one "vanilla" flavor Carnation Instant Breakfast, placed into 12 oz of hot water does me. I pack 'em in the old-style sandwich bags with the twist ties. Two of those, and I'm ready to fight the bears off bare handed (also ready to dig a cat hole within fifteen minutes).

Replaces most of the vitamins and minerals that dehydrating food gets rid of, plenty of sugar to get one ready to hit the trail, and enough caffeine to keep me from killing the first five people I have to interact with on the trail.

Works for me, at least.

Edited by FLRider on 06/11/2013 06:38:07 MDT.

brian H
(B14) - M

Locale: Siskiyou Mtns
trail cuppa solution: Mount Hagen organic instant coffee on 06/11/2013 11:27:56 MDT Print View

First I invite all non-coffee freaks to go home...this thread is for us happy addicts!
LOL

I have been a coffee snob for a very long time...long before Starbux branded the name Via, and even before AAA gave its member magazine the same name [out west anyhoo].

For me Via is decent, it is my backup choice for the trail. My #1 trail coffee solution is the only commercially available Organic freeze dried instant coffee I am aware of. It is called Mount Hagen organic instant coffee. It tastes surprising good, such that at home, when I just need a "hit" and am too lazy to grind & brew ;) it jumps in to pinch hit. It is becoming easier to find, 3 diff stores carry it in my small town. So much so that I am a bit surprised it hasnt been mentioned yet in this thread of 70+ posts as of today [at least not by name]. Its why I add my $0.02.

It's also easier to work with than Via, which is a fine powder and is clingy. MH looks like Folgers - large granules, super convenient on the trail - and thankfully to the taste buds, the similarity ends there! With Via you have more garbage headache, esp keeping tabs of the tiny top of the lil pkg if you slice it completely off [and you BETTER NOT leave any behind!]. MH comes in a glass jar. Google it.

Because grinding & brewing fresh beans twice daily is the norm 4 me, I am happy with instant on the trail, especially thanx to this nice tasting organic variety.

Edited by B14 on 06/11/2013 11:29:55 MDT.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
FWIW on 06/11/2013 11:41:33 MDT Print View

On par with cowboy coffee is Turkish coffee. This is what was available when I was in Bosnia (thanks to the Ottoman Empire) and I think it's no coincidence that I didn't have hair on my chest until that deployment.

This is the best technique I've found for Cowboy/Turkish coffee...

Use finest grind available. Unfortunately my grinder sucks but the stuff in Bosnia was like fine powder.

Bring water to a boil.

Add coffee grinds

Bring water back to a boil and then immediately remove to avoid boil over

The grounds will settle to the bottom of the mug and you won't have to filter them through your teeth until the very end.

I'm all for coffee snobbery but there's no way I'm bringing a grinder on the trail.

What’s your cowboy coffee technique?

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 11:47:39 MDT Print View

The Beautiful Cup and How do BPL Staffers stay warm, hydrated, and caffeinated in the backcountry?

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 12:02:02 MDT Print View

Mike has a good technique for Cowboy coffee but I just wanted to add something he didn't cover..

With my technique where you bring water to a boil, add coffee grounds, briefly return to a boil and remove, the coffee grounds will ime quickly settle to the bottom of the mug.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 12:06:58 MDT Print View

Ian that technique is discussed in my second link in the BPL staff video.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Thanks on 06/11/2013 12:26:56 MDT Print View

Can't access the video from my phone but I'll check it out later.

EDIT Just watched the video and yup.... took the words right out of my mouth... except that he said it before I said it.... whatevs.

Edited by IDBLOOM on 06/11/2013 18:24:23 MDT.

Charles P
(mediauras)

Locale: Terra
Re: trail cuppa solution: Mount Hagen organic instant coffee on 06/11/2013 12:44:36 MDT Print View

Nice to hear about Mount Hagen instant. I almost picked up a jar last summer but decided against it. I've been trying to use Via recently but don't really like it. Its weak brew. I'll try the MH stuff this weekend though.

Or I might just take my MSR filter and some ground coffee (beans from a local micro-roaster). Going that way is a little heavier but you get a good cup of coffee. Like others (addicts all of us!) I enjoy a nice cup of coffee on the trail. It really hits the spot.

Michael Driscoll
(Hillhikerz) - M

Locale: Monterey Bay
Lachlan... how to cut coffee weight or not on 06/11/2013 12:49:12 MDT Print View

Lachlan; Vietnamese use a style of drip filter / press called a phin... I had never heard of this and so search found this site... < http://www.vietnamese-coffee.com/coffee_accessories_shop.php > ... they have a bunch of stuff but no aluminum phin it seems... what I was fascinated with was the assortment of wire mesh strainers and Single-Use Filter-bags... love posts like this takes me on different trip altogether... Thanks

PS: Via hiker (but will try TJ)

Edited by Hillhikerz on 06/11/2013 12:50:27 MDT.

Eric Lundquist
(cobberman) - F - M

Locale: Northern Colorado
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 13:26:45 MDT Print View

I've been using the VIA packets ever since they came out. Mix in a little leftover Bailey's from the nightcap before and it's the perfect cuppa. Shug, a member over at hammock forums and famous for his hammock how-to videos, drinks and recommends Medaglia D'oro instant espresso. I finally emptied my stash of Via this year and decided to try out the Medaglia D'oro powder. It is quite good and better, in my opinion, than VIA. It is, however, harder to package.

Peter S (masc. über linear logical club)
(prse) - MLife

Locale: Denmark
Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 17:39:19 MDT Print View

Eric,

do you find that Medaglia D'oro has any acidic or bitter taste?

Thanks

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
BPL, ADD, and Caffeine don't mix... or do they? on 06/11/2013 18:50:37 MDT Print View

Last week I spent quality time googling premium pencils as lesser pencils are verboten on the JMT.

This week I find myself trying to perfect my cowboy/Turkish coffee.

Such is life.

I just wanted to add something I touched on earlier. I made a couple cups of cowboy coffee using different grinds to see how they compare. I used a French Press grind (coarser) for one and a Turkish grind (finer) for the other. I find that the smaller the grind the better when it comes to cowboy coffee. While both will settle to the bottom, the Turkish grind seems to do a better job.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
CUT coffee weight??? on 06/11/2013 19:14:43 MDT Print View

Why would you want to do that? Cuting coffee weight is akin to cutting alcohol weight or the weight of OREOS.

Kidding...

Actually now I use VIA most mornings. But I also carry one or two of my cloth drawstring tea bags (@ some kitchen stores) filled with a fresh ground mix of my own. Now there is THE coffee taste.

** To keep rising hot water steam from clogging your VIA tube pour it in before you put hot water in the mug. Don't ask...

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 19:46:35 MDT Print View

Spend some time in the military and any instant or freeze dried coffee will taste great. You will no longer be a coffee snob :)

I find that NESCAFÉ® CLÁSICO™ is the best tasting for me. It is usually found in the hispanic foods section at most big super market chains. I keep it in a ziplock sandwhich bag and then inside my food bag.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Army coffee on 06/11/2013 20:15:55 MDT Print View

"Spend some time in the military and any instant or freeze dried coffee will taste great. You will no longer be a coffee snob :)"

+1 on flavor but -1 for caffeine

The Germans used methamphetamines to fuel their blitzkrieg. We fought them back during the Battle of the Bulge with Army coffee. Definitely excels as a caffeine delivering device but a little lean on flavor. Heat tabs (trioxane) started disappearing from the supply rooms in the early '90s when the MRE heaters arrived. While great for warming up Meals Rejected by Ethiopians, MRE heaters do nothing for heating up freeze dried coffee.

So your average grunt had (to my knowledge has) a couple options:

1) Ranger pudding. Mix MRE crackers, hot cocoa, and coffee together and chow down.

2) Pour freeze dried coffee, creamer, and sugar into mouth. Take swig from canteen and swish ingredients together in mouth and enjoy iced coffee.

3) Transfer to a mechanized unit and enjoy blitzkrieg defeating Army coffee on the LD thanks to (get the he!! off of my grass) 1SG. Also works well to remove paint or clean battery terminals.

Jane Baack
(JaneB.) - MLife
How to cut coffee weight on 06/11/2013 20:46:41 MDT Print View

Peet's is entering the market for single serve coffee. Don't know if it's available yet-anyone tried it?

JJ Willcoxon
(H2Oboy) - M

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Re:Coffee the Redeemer on 06/11/2013 21:12:09 MDT Print View

Love my jetboil coffee. I grind my own beans and seal them into packets just the right size at home, so that each one is used as it is opened. The key to a good cup seems to be heating the water to near boil, shutting off the unit, adding the coffee, and letting it soak for about a minute, before using the press.

Weighs almost nothing and uses very little fuel.

Casey Jones
(cjsbug) - F
Re: How to cut coffee weight on 06/12/2013 11:24:57 MDT Print View

"Peet's is entering the market for single serve coffee. Don't know if it's available yet-anyone tried it?"

Those are K-cups, not single serve instant.

Kevin Burton
(burtonator) - F

Locale: norcal
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/12/2013 11:39:02 MDT Print View

caffeine pills... they weight 200mg... BEAT THAT! :-P

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Re: Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/13/2013 08:17:08 MDT Print View

Yeah, you tasted a caffeine pill? Just let 'em dissolve in your cheek? They make uncoated aspirin seem normal.

Will Tatman
(roboconcept)
+1 Nescafe on 06/13/2013 10:45:29 MDT Print View

I usually premix Nescafe, soymilk powder, and a bit of something sweet in a ziploc and take it with me.

Shake it up in a water bottle cold. Delicious.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Nescafe Espresso on 06/13/2013 10:56:57 MDT Print View

Nescafe Espresso instant is purported to be the best of all instants by many people who have experimented with instant coffees, including the ones discussed above - this according to my research department. I think it is very hard to find except online, and it is expensive.

http://www.amazon.com/Nescafe-Espresso-Instant-Coffee-3-5oz/dp/B002O3SAJE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371141024&sr=8-1&keywords=nescafe+espresso

However, if you are a fan of light roast American style coffee this may not fit your tastes.

I'm in the process of ordering some. Now that we have a very preliminary solution to the JMT pencil I feel like I need a resolution of this issue as well.

I made some Aeropress coffee this morning and it was excellent, even to an espresso drinker. Using a few modded techniques and a good deal of force, the Aeropress can even make something sort of like espresso, but I would not personally feel these extra mod were worth it away from my home espresso machine.

Unfortunately the weight of the LW (car camping) kit for this, including Aeropress, mini Porlex hand grinder with porcelain bur, and battery operated Aerolatte mini milk frother is still around 16 oz.

I have verified the the press component from the Bodrum 4 cup french press and a host of other french presses and possibly the one you already have (about 94 mm in diameter) does perfectly fit the Jetboil and the SP 0.7L Ti mug.(2.7 oz). It also comes apart and would pack nicely. So if you are a french press fanatic with a Jetboil or the right sized mug already then this might be a high end solution for you. Should be much better than the crap one sold by Jetboil.

I think the above will probably become my solution for car camping and overnights that involve more navel gazing than hiking. Though I will continue to practice with cowboy coffe techniques to see if I can get a good enough brew to be worth it, probably I will be satisfied with one or another of the instants in the end for UL. I may even go back to the (objectively speaking admittedly foul) General Foods International Coffees, such as cafe Vienna. These have the advantage that the milk and sugar are already in there (sugar doesn't seem to taste so bad after hiking 20 miles) and this stuff can easily be found in every crappy supermarket and even in 7-11 type stores at the last moment. Buy, open, dump in ziplock baggies and you are gtg. One "box" of this is good, I have found, for 5-7 days.

Edited by millonas on 06/13/2013 11:14:49 MDT.

Daniel Goldenberg
(dag4643)

Locale: Pacific Northwet
Re: Nescafe Espresso on 06/13/2013 11:14:21 MDT Print View

I've tried them all and I prefer nescafe espresso also. Though I get it in the individual size:
http://www.enjoybettercoffee.com/Nescafe-Espresso-Delicate-Crema-p/ne019.htm?gclid=CLCmyu_D4bcCFcU5QgodgGAALA&Click=2753

Pete Staehling
(staehpj1) - F
Must have been a different Nescafe on 06/13/2013 12:44:55 MDT Print View

I tried some individual serving Nescafe packets and found them pretty awful. I do not recall the specific product name on the package.

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Nature's coffee kettle on 06/13/2013 13:53:20 MDT Print View

Clever Hiker shared this today.

Looks interesting. If I understand it correctly, the weight is 1.2 oz for four cups.

http://www.naturescoffeekettle.com/get_real/default.aspx

Marc Shea
(FlytePacker) - F

Locale: Cascades
Re: Nature's coffee kettle on 06/13/2013 14:07:29 MDT Print View

Basically, the Nature's Kettle coffee is simply a filter bag of coffee, that you pour hot water over. I tried one out, and the fiddle factor is pretty high as you need to pour hot water into a narrow opening at the top of the bag. With hot water in one hand and the other hand trying to position the bag and opening, it was a bit of a hassle. I tried to make it as strong as possible, but in the end it just wasn't worth the hassle. The coffee that I tasted (the organic) wasn't to my taste.

They do sell the coffee in the filter bags separately, so on the plus side you could just steep it in a pot like a large tea bag. Might make good cowboy coffee with less mess and grounds in your teeth.

Another one is growers cup. http://www.growerscup.com/eng/

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: London, UK
Re: liquid coffee concentrate on 06/13/2013 16:49:29 MDT Print View

Don't know if this format is sold outside of Japan, but this type of liquid coffee concentrate is surprisingly tasty in Summer. Just add water, http://tinyurl.com/mmgdvtr

Edited by rmjapan on 06/13/2013 16:50:17 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Accept no substitutes! on 06/13/2013 17:04:32 MDT Print View

Coffee is made by pouring boiling water over ground roasted coffee beans. End of story.

Cheers
(Ducks...)

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: London, UK
Re: Re: liquid coffee concentrate on 06/13/2013 17:39:56 MDT Print View

After a web search I see BPL actually sold something similar called Java Juice.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/java_juice_coffee_extract.html

The Java Juice web site seems dead now though, http://javajuiceextract.com/

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
GSI Filter holder on 06/13/2013 18:09:31 MDT Print View

I don't know if anyone else posted this, but I use one of these with a melita paper filter in it.



VIA is okay, but it takes two packages to make a cup for me so it gets expensive quick.

Edited by Hitech on 06/13/2013 18:15:18 MDT.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 06/17/2013 10:37:49 MDT Print View

Shug

John Holmes
(jcholmes)

Locale: SouthEastern US
Via or Dk Choc covered espresso beans on 06/17/2013 12:55:45 MDT Print View

If I can heat water, I use Via. Tastes great in the woods :)

For fast and light, I take Dark Chocolate covered Espresso Beans!
Pros
- Dual purpose (caffeine AND energy boost)
- No waiting
- Eat while hiking
Cons
- Depending on the brand you get (I like Trader Joe's) can get gummy in the heat.

Honestly...if you can get over not having that gorgeous hot liquid in the morning, they may actually be better than coffee.

Phillip Asby
(PGAsby) - M

Locale: North Carolina
Aeropress on 05/17/2014 11:43:25 MDT Print View

I like my coffee - a lot. On the trail it remains critical toy happiness. Tried a couple instants including via and never been happy with that totally. Have an rei press mug that works well but is super heavy (all metal construction double walled etc - not a backpacking design).

So I picked up a snow peak to press and it works pretty well - but just tried an aeropress and I'm trying to figure out why they aren't more popular on the trail. Pretty compact overall and fairly lightweight - plus great tasting coffee quickly. Super easy cleanup. I'm taking mine on the next trip to give it a real road test.

It seems like the most convenient quality cup...

Edited by PGAsby on 05/17/2014 11:45:27 MDT.

Derek M.
(dmusashe) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Never popular to bring up on 05/17/2014 13:43:55 MDT Print View

I had a professor in college tell me a story about a backpacking trip she took in Arizona. To save weight and lessen her water demands in the dry environment, she decided to leave her coffee making setup at home and just bring a bag of coarsely ground coffee beans...

...Beans that she intended to just chew on, straight, just like chewing tobacco, to get her caffeine fix.

After waking up the first morning in camp and loading her mouth with coffee grounds, she said she took a moment to consider what she was doing. A bit of coffee spittle oozed out of her mouth and she became appalled with herself, spit it all out, and immediately dumped her baggie of coffee grounds.

Needless to say, the lecture she was giving that day in class was on addiction.

...Of course, the lecture took place many years after the story, and she was giving it while drinking a strong cup of coffee...

I am not a coffee drinker myself so I can't really answer the OP's question. My wife has taken starbucks via on trips before and has liked it.

Of course, as a non-coffee drinker, I would suggest simply going without, as a few others have, but that's not going to be a popular solution to any coffee drinkers (i.e. the people who actually care about the answers on this thread).

Edited by dmusashe on 05/17/2014 17:30:29 MDT.

Daryl and Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: how to cut coffee weight on 05/17/2014 14:33:26 MDT Print View

I put a spoonful of cheapo instant coffee in my granola each morning when backpacking and at home. Works for me.

Delmar O'Donnell
(Bolster)

Locale: Between Jacinto & Gorgonio
Coffee Granola on 05/17/2014 14:47:05 MDT Print View

Coffee flavored granola? I should reject this craziness out of hand, but I'm inexplicably attracted to the idea.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Coffee Granola on 05/17/2014 14:59:38 MDT Print View

If you ate your granola with coffee without heating it, you wouldn't need a stove which would save some weight

Robin Luger
(robinannie.luger@gmail.com) - MLife
Homemade coffee concentrate on 05/18/2014 20:25:56 MDT Print View

For short trips, I've made coffee concentrate, then carried a small plastic drink bottle full (two ounces a day maybe) and add it to some hot water in a titanium mug. Real coffee!! And very simple (with no cream and sugar).

Also, you can just sip one swallow of the concentrate for a mid-hike jolt. The flavor holds for several days.

There's lots of opinions on the best ways to make concentrate but here's a few:
http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2013/08/26/cold-brewed-coffee

Guess you could also make it on the trip-don't know how the jostling during the day would affect it.

Doug Green
(dougpgreen) - M

Locale: North Carolina Piedmont
Coffee Snob on 05/18/2014 20:55:04 MDT Print View

I am an admitted coffee snob...unfortunately made that way a few years ago by my son. I buy unroasted beans and fresh roast every week at home with my own roaster. I grind the beans right before using them. Roasted whole beans start loosing flavor after a week or two, and ground coffee looses much of its flavor within 12 hours. The beans I prefer are sourced either from my favorite region in Guatemala (HueHue) preferably from two or three farms in the Agua Dulce region (I have spent time on several occasions on a coffee farm in that region), or from Ethiopia from the Yirgacheffe region, preferably grade 1. My point is...I've become extremely picky about my coffee.

So...why in the world would I drink instant VIA CRAP coffee when on the trail? Same reason I eat dehydrated food and sleep on a one inch mattress. Because weight matters when I am trying to enjoy the HIKE, and there is no way I carry even a lightweight version of my pour over system, french press, or even my aero press. And, I find that crap instant coffee and dehydrated food taste good on the trail because I AM OUTSIDE DOING WHAT I LOVE TO DO!

Just one mans opinion, not right or wrong. Feel free to make fun of me for carrying a 3 ounce knife :)

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Coffee Snob on 05/19/2014 18:17:27 MDT Print View

"So...why in the world would I drink instant VIA CRAP coffee when on the trail? Same reason I eat dehydrated food and sleep on a one inch mattress. Because weight matters when I am trying to enjoy the HIKE, and there is no way I carry even a lightweight version of my pour over system, french press, or even my aero press. And, I find that crap instant coffee and dehydrated food taste good on the trail because I AM OUTSIDE DOING WHAT I LOVE TO DO!"

+1 Finally, a kindred spirit. Somehow I now feel just a little less alone in this cold, cold world. ;0)

"Just one mans opinion, not right or wrong."

Uh, make that two.

"Feel free to make fun of me for carrying a 3 ounce knife :)"

Just couldn't quit while you were ahead, could ya? ;0)

Glenn S
(Glenn64) - M

Locale: Snowhere, MN
Re: Re: Coffee on 05/19/2014 19:12:02 MDT Print View

I wouldn't consider myself a snob, but I hate instant coffee. Never tried that Via stuff, but not a Starbucks fan, as I prefer Caribou. Just the Folgers brew bags if I'm doing the beer can cook kit. If I'm woodstoving it with the Bushbuddy, then it's cowboy Folgers or Caribou, then poured through the GSI strainer. I've done the cold water trick for cowboy coffee, and tapping the mug, and pouring slowly, and for 12 grams, the strainer is just so much easier.

Jake S
(spags) - M
mug + GSI ultralight on 05/19/2014 19:43:42 MDT Print View

108g (3.8oz) for a GSI insulated mug and a GSI ultralight javadrip.

And in the summer I don't even heat it, I just let the grounds steep in my pot overnight (this does require more grounds), filter it in the morning into the mug and drink.

Edited by spags on 05/19/2014 20:21:41 MDT.

Doug Green
(dougpgreen) - M

Locale: North Carolina Piedmont
Coffee Snob on 05/19/2014 20:25:17 MDT Print View

It's OK that we all have our own priorities. It's been said that if two people are exactly alike, one of them isn't necessary.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: Coffee Snob on 05/20/2014 01:06:01 MDT Print View

Doug, I'm with you on that. I also roast my own beans, have an expensive espresso machine that I "can't live without", and completely buy into that the beans have to be roasted within 10 days, and ground withing a few minutes or something major is lost. So like you as a result, and after many contortions, I just use the best 3-in-1 instant I can find. If I have to drink swill might as well be light and convenient swill.

I will say that an areopress, using the permanent metal "porta filter" and not the paper filters (which are an abomination) does a very nice car camping mode simulation of an espresso. You even get a good head of crema. But again, if you don't grind the beans right before hand there is no point. My little Japanese porcelain head burr grinder fits neatly inside the aeropress handle so it is compact, but too heavy for more than an overnight backpacking trip.

Oh, and Sweet Maria's Espresso Monkey espresso blend is awesome!

http://www.sweetmarias.com/sweetmarias/coffee/sweet-maria-s-espresso-monkey-blend.html

Edited by millonas on 05/20/2014 01:12:14 MDT.

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
instant on 05/20/2014 08:34:13 MDT Print View

If all I had was instant I'd go without. And I have before. I just don't need the caffeine. I drink coffee for the taste. If it doesn't taste good then there is no point.

Edited by Hitech on 05/20/2014 09:48:26 MDT.

Marko Botsaris
(millonas) - F - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz Mountains, CA
Re: instant on 05/20/2014 09:28:05 MDT Print View

Taste is a matter of taste, however.

Hope I cleared that up.

Bob Moulder
(bobmny10562) - F - M

Locale: Westchester County, NY
Re: Coffee Snob on 05/20/2014 09:47:59 MDT Print View

"Because weight matters when I am trying to enjoy the HIKE, and there is no way I carry even a lightweight version of my pour over system, french press, or even my aero press. And, I find that crap instant coffee and dehydrated food taste good on the trail because I AM OUTSIDE DOING WHAT I LOVE TO DO!"

+1!!

There are a lot more options when you're a mission-flexible all-weather daytime/nightime fighter/bomber.

I'm not a coffee snob, but I like a great cup when I can get it, although I am also perfectly happy with Taster's Choice on the trail. 10-day supply weighs about 4oz. One of the reasons I can wake up, fire up the Emberlit, have my coffee and instant oatmeal, pack up and be moving in 20 minutes or so.

Edited by bobmny10562 on 05/20/2014 11:06:55 MDT.

Wēb 2
(djbg13) - M
Another vote for Mount Hagen on 05/20/2014 12:01:47 MDT Print View

It's all I usually drink on the trail, during kayaking trips, and even at home except when my girlfriend brews me fancy stuff). She's a coffee connoisseur who wouldn't touch my Mount Hagen but she would drink it on the trail sometimes.

One day I made her the following iced late that she didn't realize was made with Mount Hagen:
Just a few ounces of hot water in a pint glass, enough to dissolve a heaping teaspoon of mount hagen. Add heaping teaspoon of mount hagen. Mix in a small amount of vanilla and some honey to dissolve. Fill to top with ice and top off with soy or regular milk (we prefer soy). She thought it was awesome (as do I) but not sure if she would have still felt that way had I started with "this was made with mount hagen."

She still wont drink the mt hagen plain but enjoys the lattes here and there.

Anyways, I'm a big fan of the mount hagen. I don't like strong/dark roast coffee and the Mt. Hagen has a lighter roast flavor to it. I drink a cup every day... It's perfect for a guy like me. Some might describe my style as lazy, I just like to think of it as maximizing my efficiency!

Derek

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Actually... on 05/20/2014 22:25:16 MDT Print View

Although I prefer VIA over other instant coffee I've found Taster's Choice freeze-dried to be 2nd best.

Charles Vines
(Charliev) - F

Locale: Eatonton, Georgia
Packing coffee on 05/21/2014 11:29:33 MDT Print View

I grind my favorite, measure it out for the amount i want to brew at a time. Usually 1 tablespoon per 12 oz. water. Tie it up in paper filter with string. Then heat water then dunk and brew like a tea bag.
Pack the little bags in zip lock.