Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking – Going SUL in the Mountains with Adequate Shelter, Insulation, and Rain Protection. Part 2C: Selecting the Lightest, Most Functional Gear - Cooking, Water, Trekking Poles, and Accessories
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Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking – Going SUL in the Mountains with Adequate Shelter, Insulation, and Rain Protection. Part 2C: Selecting the Lightest, Most Functional Gear - Cooking, Water, Trekking Poles, and Accessories on 05/29/2013 12:56:18 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking – Going SUL in the Mountains with Adequate Shelter, Insulation, and Rain Protection. Part 2C: Selecting the Lightest, Most Functional Gear - Cooking, Water, Trekking Poles, and Accessories

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking – Going SUL in the Mountains with Adequate Shelter, Insulation, and Rain Protection. Part 2C: Selecting the Lightest, Most Functional Gear - Cooking, Water, Trekking Poles, and Accessories on 05/29/2013 16:27:29 MDT Print View

Looks good, Will.

J J
(jraiderguy) - M

Locale: Puget Sound
Another great article on 05/29/2013 16:45:07 MDT Print View

Thanks for another great addition to the series. I'm taking all this in as something to aspire to, but I did have one logistics question related to the cook system: Do you carry spoons and a plate when cooking for two? Or an extra cup for coffee?

Thanks!

Adam Klagsbrun
(klags) - MLife

Locale: Northeast US
Poles on 05/29/2013 17:09:15 MDT Print View

This is a great series, making me think twice about a lot of things. One thing I think is worth pointing out, though, is the often very high cost of UL gear. Because of that, I wanted to draw attention to another option in the trekking poles category that I think a lot of people overlook - the carbon poles seem extremely expensive, and possibly more easily broken in a fall than other poles. For this, and for cost reasons, I bought a set of these:

http://www.fizan.it/?page_id=104&lang=en

Fizan Compact poles. They are amazing. They weigh so little, never slip on me, and cost about half of what the other options cost, including shipping from the UK. Currently available here:

http://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/fizan_compact_trekking_poles.html

I have been using them for 2 seasons now and they are just amazingly good poles, work for setting up my shelter(s) and can take all of my weight in a fall (maybe I was just lucky?)

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking on 05/29/2013 21:11:53 MDT Print View

Fixed length poles will work for your shelter; just do a clove hitch around the pole at the appropriate height. There is one big exception--if you're a shorty like me! The length I need for hiking is definitely shorter than I need for my shelter, so I have to have adjustable poles. Besides, if I'm scrambling through brush (I try to avoid it, but it happens) it's far more convenient to collapse the poles and tie them to my pack.

The Sawyer Squeeze can be used as a gravity filter as well as squeezing; I've tried it both ways. Screw the dirty water container to the top (as is done when squeezing), hitch a piece of tubing to the bottom filter outlet to attach to your water container. I tried a Steripen and couldn't get it to function properly even with my electrical engineer son helping with instruction sheet in hand. I have the same objections as you to the other methods of water treatment, except that I got a really severe reaction from iodine, which has left me unable to eat anything made with iodized salt or any seafood.

Looking forward to the gear lists and reviews!

Edited by hikinggranny on 05/29/2013 21:15:19 MDT.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
poles on 05/29/2013 22:04:12 MDT Print View

@ Adam:
"
http://www.fizan.it/?page_id=104&lang=en

Fizan Compact poles. They are amazing. They weigh so little, never slip on me, and cost about half of what the other options cost, including shipping from the UK. Currently available here:

http://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/fizan_compact_trekking_poles.html

I have been using them for 2 seasons now and they are just amazingly good poles, work for setting up my shelter(s) and can take all of my weight in a fall (maybe I was just lucky?)"

I have been using some for about 1.5 yrs, and have 400+ miles on them.
One of mine has cracked in some spots. Not sure of cause. Hasnt failed, hasnt slipped.
In fact the older and more corroded the insider surface of the aluminum tube gets, the better they hold I think.

I ordered another pair recently. There simply isnt anything else out there that compares. fully adjustable 3 piece up to 135cm length, down to very short, all aluminum, stiff, and best of all, AVAILABLE (sort of).

The BA passport/helinox had a reputation for being extremely flexible, GG adjustable and Ruta Locura are never in stock, locus gear fliplock isnt in stock, and some complaints were had about previous twistloks.

James DeGraaf
(jdegraaf) - MLife

Locale: Bay Area
Cook Kits on 05/30/2013 10:24:14 MDT Print View

If going with Esbit; for a complete cook kit you could add the Lite Trail Solid Fuel Cook Kit to the list above.

http://litetrail.com/shop/litetrail-titanium-solid-fuel-cook-system

3.3 oz and everything is included except a spoon. Add a 0.3 ti spoon for a complete Esbit kit @ 3.6oz sans ignition source. Something else to consider and I've had success with it.

-James

David Pex
(dpex) - MLife

Locale: Pacific NW
Water Filtration and Stove Choices on 05/30/2013 12:10:49 MDT Print View

One choice you did not mention (and I have not seen it in other forums either) is the Sawyer in-line water filter (http://www.sawyer.com/water.html#water1 or http://www.rei.com/product/801824/sawyer-3-way-inline-water-filter?preferredSku=8018240013&cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-pla-_-product-_-8018240013&mr:referralID=ff1d78c9-c953-11e2-a969-001b2166c2c0). Not a squeeze filter, just attaches to the end of my hydration bag's hose, filters as I suck the water, and only weighs two ounces!

For a stove, I use the Trail Designs Sidewinder (http://www.traildesigns.com/stoves/caldera-sidewinder). Versatile, can use alcohol, Esbit, or wood. Very light, my entire kit (for Esbit) is 4.5 ounces. I don't mind the residue, it easily comes off with a little water and a wipe from my bandana.

Dave

David Gardner
(GardnerOutdoorLD) - M

Locale: Northern California
Re: Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking – Going SUL in the Mountains with Adequate Shelter, Insulation, and Rain Protection. Part 2C: Selecting the Lightest, Most Functional Gear - Cooking, Water, Trekking Poles, and Accessories on 05/31/2013 14:34:08 MDT Print View

Just a short note regarding my GOLD complete kitchens.

All of my systems are adapted to burn wood also (using the base sheet), as well as alcohol and Esbits (no base sheet needed).

Regarding my Fanatic Solo Ti kitchen, when set up just for Esbits with no base sheet the weight is 2.8 oz using duct tape for the cozy (the version you have for the article), and 2.6 oz using nylon sail repair tape (the current production version). The weight listed in your article includes both the Esbit burner as well as an alcohol stove and fuel bottle.

Thanks for the great series of articles!duct tapesail tape

Tom Clark
(TomClark) - MLife

Locale: East Coast
Re: Mountain SuperUltraLight Backpacking – Going SUL in the Mountains with Adequate Shelter, Insulation, and Rain Protection. Part 2C: Selecting the Lightest, Most Functional Gear - Cooking, Water, Trekking Poles, and Accessories on 06/02/2013 08:48:14 MDT Print View

Keep these great series coming.
Tom