Forum Index » Editor's Roundtable » The SUL Wanderer (Video Series) - Episode 2: Food & Water


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Jose Galhoz
(GAUROCH) - MLife
Re: Re: Fires and Simplicity on 05/30/2013 07:15:29 MDT Print View

I can do without warm "food", but I do need a hot soup or tea at night...
I've tried alcool-gel and RocketMSR...any other sugestions?

Jeff Gerke
(mtnrunner) - M

Locale: Utah
Re: Re: Fires and Simplicity on 05/30/2013 07:26:00 MDT Print View

+2 for doing a best "no cook" meals article.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Fires and Simplicity on 05/30/2013 08:50:10 MDT Print View

Jose asked, "I can do without warm "food", but I do need a hot soup or tea at night...
I've tried alcool-gel and RocketMSR...any other sugestions?"


I use an Esbit titanium wing stove, a 450ml titanium mug, an aluminum foil lid and windscreen. It is perfect for warm drinks, soups and instant oatmeal. Great for a day hiking and overnight hike kitchen. I have a folding spoon that fits inside too.

Sunny Waller
(dancer) - M

Locale: Southeast USA
Folding Spoon on 05/30/2013 09:03:48 MDT Print View

Dale.. what folding spoon do you use? I have not been able to find one..

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Which cord for hanging food? on 05/30/2013 09:08:39 MDT Print View

I use Zing It, which is made for use by arborists (tree trimmers) to haul larger lines over branches. It is light and strong and has a coating to aid the process.

John Taylorson
(heyjt) - M

Locale: SoCal
Spork/Spoon on 05/30/2013 09:10:01 MDT Print View

I ditched my spork a couple years ago. I found that I was not using the fork-end and they are hard to handle.

Instead, I use a long spoon (Sea To Summit .4oz)a little heavy but helpful with freezer bag cooking. If I do end up bringing food that requires a fork or stabbing, I make chopsticks from twigs. They are easy to carve, light and multi-purpose.

Great videos!

My wife chowing down lunch with forest-provided chopsticks
chopsticks

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Folding Spoon on 05/30/2013 09:18:44 MDT Print View

Yes, folding sporks are readily available, but I had to get the spoons from China via eBay. I considered importing a bunch and distributing them myself. The ones I got are made by Fire Maple. They were rather expensive at the time. I see now that competition has kicked in and there are a good number available for $10.99 each with shipping from China.

I also got some folding hard anodized aluminum spoons that were perefectly acceptable. They had a good shape and a very smooth edge.

Bruce Warren
(Aimee) - F - MLife
Re: The SUL Wanderer (Video Series) - Episode 2: Food & Water on 05/30/2013 09:38:57 MDT Print View

How come the video panel tells me... "Sorry, The creator of this video has not given you permission to embed it on this domain. This is a Vimeo Plus feature."

Both episodes say this.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Refresh your screen on 05/30/2013 09:52:48 MDT Print View

I got the same message from Vimeo, but refreshing my screen after logging in seemed to solve the problem. I have no idea why, and IMHO it shouldn't be necessary.

Wim Depondt
(wim_depondt) - F - MLife

Locale: The low countries
glacial water on 05/30/2013 11:49:29 MDT Print View

Any SUL techniques to get rid of them tiny silt particles in glacial water?

Wim

John Taylorson
(heyjt) - M

Locale: SoCal
Re: glacial water on 05/30/2013 12:05:42 MDT Print View

"Any SUL techniques to get rid of them tiny silt particles in glacial water?"

Use a bandana or other fine cloth as a prefilter. I've also brought a paper coffee filter

-jt

George Turner Jr
(gctj)
Very good series on 05/30/2013 15:50:03 MDT Print View

Thanks for renewing my interest in SUL. I am 7 to 8.5 lbs base weight now but always looking to lighten up even if I never go to 5 or less.

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
getting bearbag rope over a branch: The SUL Wanderer - Episode 2 on 05/30/2013 17:28:05 MDT Print View

Using too small of a rock means that your cord (and the sack) can get stuck in the tree if not enough weight is placed into the rock sack to overcome the friction of the cord running across the branch/through limbs after you toss it.

I struggled with this for years ... very frustrating ... until I was taught how to eliminate the friction ... by a 15 year old boy scout.

1) Have a loop on your end of the line and hook a finger of your left hand through it so you maintain control of that end.
2) Wrap about half the line around the rock sack. Hold that ball of sack/line in your right hand.
3) Coil all but about 4 feet of the other half of the rope into loose loops about 8-10 inches in diameter. Close the left hand with index finger extended and pointing where you want to throw the rock sack and hang those loops over the index finger
4) Throw the sack

I'm right handed, switch hands if you are a leftie.

Having the rope coiled up and not laying on the ground drastically reduces the chance of snagging on surrounding vegetation.

The weight of the rock sack easily pulls the coiled line off your index finger.

The sack starts to roll once is is over the branch and it has reached the end of the line not wrapped around the sack. That roll unwinds the line wrapped around the rock sack ... no friction because the the line is not being pulled over the branch.

NOW ... anyone have ideas for improving my throwing accuracy?

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
Re: Very good series on 05/30/2013 17:30:15 MDT Print View

Very good indeed!

And valuable even for one who's goal falls short (heavy) of SUL.

Ron Bell
(mountainlaureldesigns) - F - M

Locale: USA
Re: getting bearbag rope over a branch: The SUL Wanderer - Episode 2 on 05/31/2013 10:26:23 MDT Print View

Nice tip Jim!


If anyone wants a larger rope bag just note that on your MLD order and we can make a larger one for you.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: getting bearbag rope over a branch: The SUL Wanderer - Episode 2 on 05/31/2013 11:51:56 MDT Print View

"NOW ... anyone have ideas for improving my throwing accuracy?"

Depends on how you throw? If you throw underhanded, or throw like you're throwing a baseball, I can improve your accuracy.

Throw the bag like it's a grenade. Best way for bear bag line throwing.

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
video equipment? on 06/01/2013 13:19:44 MDT Print View

Ryan....

Or anyone else who has some advice....

What video equipment are you using to film these episodes? Ive got a gopro hero 3 for action shots, but am looking for the best lightweight video device for slow pans and documentary purposes. Any suggestions?

Edited by cfionthefly on 06/01/2013 13:20:18 MDT.

Bradley Danyluk
(dasbin) - MLife
wood fire smoke on 06/02/2013 17:26:00 MDT Print View

Just want to point out the flip side of wood fires.

Despite our "natural" relationship to wood fires for most of human history, the fact is there is no amount of smoke from a wood fire that is safe to inhale. Most of the particles in smoke are below the nano-meter scale that gets embedded in the lungs for decades and causes all kinds of damage - it's associated with asthma, allergies, heart problems, other breathing difficulties, and lung cancer. Some studies suggest wood smoke is up to 10 times more damaging than tobacco smoke. It's also extremely polluting. In some cities where wood-burning is common, it is the biggest contributor to air pollution and to breathing problems locally - more so than vehicle exhaust.

I know this all probably sounds rather ridiculous, as the good ol' campfire seems such a hearty and natural pastime, but the science is pretty solidly against it ever being a good idea unless absolutely necessary. It's important to try to get past the cognitive dissonance when thinking about these sorts of things. Then again, I suspect a lot of folks likely just don't care much.

Edited by dasbin on 06/02/2013 17:32:10 MDT.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
Re: wood fire smoke on 06/02/2013 17:43:48 MDT Print View

We already had a huge thread on this.

Most of the posters agreed that while wood smoke is harmful, in an open area (outside) you don't inhale much smoke. And having a campfire on a few trips each year isn't significant. I think the issue is with using a wood stove or fireplace in your home.

"Some studies suggest wood smoke is up to 10 times more damaging than tobacco smoke."
Maybe that's true, but we aren't inhaling pine cigarettes.


Our culture now has an alarmist attitude to anything remotely unhealthy while ignoring all of the significant things that damage our health every day.

Jim Colten
(jcolten)

Locale: MN
Re: wood fire smoke on 06/02/2013 19:52:04 MDT Print View

the fact is there is no amount of smoke from a wood fire that is safe to inhale.

So true ... in fact about as true as:

the fact is there is no amount of smoke from the motor vehicle that drove me to the trailhead this weekend that is safe to inhale.

Those who travel in 100% electric vehicles will need to climb a power plant chimney to sample that smoke before declaring safety.

If the electric vehicle is charge by photovoltaics or wind turbine ... they might be less harmful in the long run (unless you are a bird using a flyway populated by the turbines) but the emissions from manufacturing that equipment are certainly hazardous.

To paraphrase Hamlet (OK, butcher might be more accurate) "Get thee to thy bubble"

I'm not always this grumpy (am I?) but I just returned from a rainy weekend of trial maintenance ... no way to keep dry doing that other than staying home and temps were solidly in the hypothermia range. I have a stronger than average personal furnace but still started shivering within seconds of stepping away from the campfire to pitch our TarpTent. Went to bed a couple hours later almost completely dry thanks to that fire.