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solo winter tent options
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Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
solo winter tent options on 05/16/2013 22:53:47 MDT Print View

I have a TT Scarp 2 that I "winterized" with several mods. Fine, that takes care of the 2 person, 4 season tent for me.

But for solo winter tents I think one could use the following TT solo tents:

Scarp 1 W/ ripstop inner tent (more foot room for storage)

Moment DW W/ ripstop inner (less weight than Scarp 1 and more aerodynamic)

So, which one of these (or other brands) do you like for a winter solo tent?



P.S.
The Notch may not be good enough for high winds and heavy snow loads.

Will Elliott
(elliott.will) - F

Locale: Juneau, AK
Tent on 05/24/2013 23:09:18 MDT Print View

Whatshisname used a tarp over a snow trench on Denali in January in fair weather and dug a full snowcave when the weather was bad. Do you have enough snow for something like this? My dad trapped for a number of years in the winter using a tarp in lean to pitch with a campfire in front.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
snow caves & trenches on 05/27/2013 16:54:44 MDT Print View

Will,

I've made and slept in caves, trenches and quinzhees. They are fine IF you have the time to make them. In storms I prefer them to tents. But they are not good for cross country travel where you make a new camp every afternoon.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
solo winter tent options on 05/28/2013 21:24:20 MDT Print View

More of the group I bp with have a BD Hilight, like I do. Not sure why they have all been driven that way. I'd say at least four of us that I personally know have one now. Best in cold conditions, that way the rain can't get you damp. I still have to vent it BIG or get a lot of condensation or frost inside. It would zip up spindrift tight if needed, but I've never tested it in heavy snow or high, blowing snow conditions. Snow is easily shaken off during the night, then pushed away from the sides. That could be a pita in heavy snow fall. 3.5 lbs. seam sealed, 4 stakes, more needed in high winds to avoid damage from rocks used as anchors.
Duane

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
solo winter tent options on 05/28/2013 22:03:07 MDT Print View

Sure it's heavy for this crowd. Hilleberg Unna has been a warm, dry, rock stable home away from home. I'll take some more room for winter's long nights.

Richard Fischel
(RICKO) - F
solo winter tent options on 05/30/2013 21:12:04 MDT Print View

i'm very happy with my bd lighthouse. palace if solo and if you need to take on a tent-mate (planned or unplanned) there's no problem. i've had it out in high winds and snow without any problem. condensation control is just another skill to be mastered. you can't seal-up any tent and think you aren't going to get condensation. i've had mine out in heavy, but not prolonged and prolonged, but not heavy rain without any leakage issues.

Will Elliott
(elliott.will) - F

Locale: Juneau, AK
Tents on 06/13/2013 11:22:31 MDT Print View

I've used

BD lighthouse (great but too much for 1 person)
custom pyramid (about duomid size)
Big tipi with kifaru stove
Snow cave
Tarp

Of all those I think the pyramid was best for most winter conditions. You needed more prep, but as it gets dark early in the winter, setting up your site gives you something to do during that long twilight. The tarp wasn't much protection against blowing snow. The big tipi with stove was great, but doesn't make sense for a camp that's moved often. The tent was overkill. Snowcaves were pretty location dependent. Integral Designs has made some great snow shelters over the years, some of them now discontinued. Have fun!

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Moment DW with ripstop innner on 06/29/2013 11:53:51 MDT Print View

I've decided on the Moment DW with the soon-to-be-released ripstop inner.

Even with that "solid" inner it will be about 10 oz. lighter than the Scarp 1 and I really don't need the extra interior space of the Scarp 1.

From owning the original single wall Moment and modding it I know I can easily run the crossing pole inside the Moment DW's fly for more complete support against snow load and wind. I'll get a heavier duty main pole for winter.

With the Moment DW's two vestibules I can store my pack in one and, if stormbound, cook in the other with the good cross ventilation of two doors and two end vents.

I'll post the mod photos sometime in September.

Joshua Ellis
(jbaysurfer) - F

Locale: West Coast
Just throwing it out there... on 08/21/2013 18:14:13 MDT Print View

Just throwing it out there that I'll be looking forward to seeing the mods on this. I am an avid winter backcountry traveler (splitboard) and am looking for an option other then my Oware WP/Breathable Bivy for multi night base camps this coming season.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Maybe November on 08/22/2013 00:42:27 MDT Print View

Josh,

Due to an emergency "investment" of $9,651. in a totally new HVAC system for my house I'll have to wait 'til November to get the Moment DW. The X-ing pole mod is very easy.

I'll post the mod pix in November and later in the winter shots of the tent under snow load.

Joshua Ellis
(jbaysurfer) - F

Locale: West Coast
ouch... on 08/22/2013 10:48:14 MDT Print View

Ouch. I'll be checking in November then. Hope your HVAC unit keeps you warm and comfortable in your "other" shelter. :-)