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Maia
(maia) - MLife

Locale: Rocky Mountains
SUL BikeRaftFishPacking (BFRP) on 05/15/2013 07:50:11 MDT Print View

Companion forum thread to:

SUL BikeRaftFishPacking (BFRP)

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: Bikeraftpackfishing on 05/15/2013 08:53:02 MDT Print View

Dude. You can't talk about singlespeeding without saying what gear ratio you runnin.

Time to upgrade to a ss-specific frame, or at least flip the spring and run that singulator in the push up position so you can shorten your chain.

Ron Babington
(Ohbejoyful) - MLife

Locale: Greenville, SC
re: Bikeraftpackfishing on 05/15/2013 12:28:04 MDT Print View

Could also convert to this bio hub for running ss with vertical dropouts: http://www.whiteind.com/rearhubs/singlespeedhubs.html

I'm racing the Tour Divide in June on my full rigid ss Niner carbon Air9 (32/17)... I should probably post my gear list to get it dialed in by this august body??

Frank H.
(porker110) - F

Locale: California
SUL BikeRaftFishPacking (BFRP) on 05/15/2013 13:32:12 MDT Print View

What Bivy Sack is that?

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: Eccentric hub on 05/15/2013 13:47:13 MDT Print View

An Eno is an option, though I'd assume Ryan's frame has 130mm rear spacing, and the narrower chainline can be a problem with chainring clearance.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: SUL BikeRaftFishPacking (BFRP) on 05/15/2013 14:39:31 MDT Print View

Nice Brookie!
Thanks, Ryan.

Ron Babington
(Ohbejoyful) - MLife

Locale: Greenville, SC
re: eccentric hub on 05/15/2013 15:12:12 MDT Print View

I'm successfully running one on my 130mm track bike conversion (alum Cervelo frame, 53/17), though it did require running the big ring inside the spider.

But yeah, shrinking the chain would be more efficient *and* save some weight. :)

William Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
Re: SUL BikeRaftFishPacking (BFRP) on 05/15/2013 19:00:30 MDT Print View

"My SUL raft is a vintage 1980s Curtis Designs Packraft (22 oz!)"

Oh, baby, I want one of those!

Bill S.

Tjaard Breeuwer
(Tjaard) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota, USA
Can you get your bike on that raft? on 05/15/2013 21:22:01 MDT Print View

Can you put that bike on that raft to cross rivers etc?

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Can you get your bike on that raft? on 05/15/2013 21:25:26 MDT Print View

If you are very careful.The end of a brake cable in the wrong place could be a problem. ........sssssssss


PackBike
(well, perhaps not That bike and That packraft...)

Edited by greg23 on 05/15/2013 21:43:49 MDT.

Joel Benford
(Morte66) - F - M

Locale: Surrey flatlands, England
Bivys for the sheer joy of them on 05/16/2013 05:42:13 MDT Print View

I see you like bivvies.

I think BPL needs a survey of LVBP -- Lightweight Voluntary Bivy Packing. Bivvies for people who just plain like sleeping in bivvies. An article starting from the premise "I want to use a bivy as often as possible, what are the options?". There was a SOTM, but it's been a while now, and didn't have this approach to the question.

Then you can look at desert bivvies with ponchos for occasional rain, eVent bivvies, Cindarellas like the Unishelter, inflatable mats and winter bags in bivvies, the ins and outs of bugnet designs, the ins and outs of getting in and out (especially in the rain), the joys of cooking in a bivy...

Daniel Pittman
(pitsy) - M

Locale: Central Texas
Spares? on 05/16/2013 12:30:48 MDT Print View

What kind of spares do you bring for the bike? I'm worried that if you use a bike to cover a lot of mileage then suffer a breakdown, you might have a looong walk back. What do you consider a safe minimum for trailside bike repairs?

And, you can run a single-speed setup on a bike with vertical dropouts without a chain tensioner or eccentric-axle hub.

Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
bikeraftfishpacking on 05/17/2013 09:04:42 MDT Print View

@DaveC: 36/18. I like it for dirt roads, and allows me to commute reasonably. I have to walk up some hills with it, though, and the kids smoke me on the downhills of course. I'm looking for a SS frame. I'm not very smart when it comes to bikes, so it's hard for me to figure this out with online shopping.

@RonBabington: I've been looking at the Air9. I'd love to see your build. Can you post here?

@FrankH: MLD eVENT bivy.

@Tjaard: Yes, but no reasonable way to tie it down so it's strictly limited to *really* calm lake/river crossings or there will be a huge yard sale.

@Pitsy: I'll bring 2 tubes, patch kit, a few chain links, hex set, and pump, for the usual overnighter where I'm within a half-day's walk to a road/car.

Ron Babington
(Ohbejoyful) - MLife

Locale: Greenville, SC
Niner Air9 on 05/17/2013 09:57:26 MDT Print View

@boss, happy to. I'll post pics and a build list early next week in this space.

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
Re: bikeraftfishpacking on 05/17/2013 15:45:51 MDT Print View

Fun article! I think cyclists are great ultralighters at heart, and we've got a "weight weenie" population that makes the BPL jokes about drilling toothbrushes all the more hilarious for those of us that have seen, or made, drilled-out chainrings, cogs and brake lever or paid obscene amounts to save a few grams (and get it in 3d purple).

I love the singlespeed conversion. Nicely done and it looks like you've fully realized what our multi-speed only compatriots can't see as anything but crazy: it's funnerer on an SS!

Ryan, I suggest you check out the weight savings AND reliability you can get by converting your wheels to tubeless, most likely by using the "Stan's method". Essentially, you'll seal off the rims by replacing the rim strip with some packing tape, ditch most of the inner tube and replace it with some fiber-laden, latex "bullet proof tire" sauce right out of Nixon's limo. You will save a few grams by eliminating the tube, net after adding the "sauce", you'll save even more because you will only need one spare tube as a conservative backup.

In fact, you'll get way less flats and, after you learn your limits on low tire pressure (ie how far is too far), you'll have an extremely reliable system that shaves weight and works better.

I haven't gone over the fully-rigid cliff yet (ie returned to fully rigid) and I can't quite stomach the idea of adding pack weight and racks to my beloved 69'er SS (100mm of Maverick American up front). Articles like this, and the stuff in Scouting about "bikepacking" do have me thinking about putting some cargo capacity on the an old boinger bike though.

Doug Johnson
(djohnson) - MLife

Locale: Washington State
LOVE it. on 05/17/2013 16:39:06 MDT Print View

I absolutely loved this article. Thank you Ryan!

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: LOVE it. on 05/17/2013 17:00:30 MDT Print View

Ryan,

I'm not sure if I should thank you or curse you. I've found my frame ($50 chromoly w/ track fork ends) and now shopping for parts to build my SS.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
SUL BikeRaftFishPacking (BFRP) on 05/17/2013 17:14:32 MDT Print View

I remeber seeing a picture of museum display of a traditional kayaking rig that used paddles similar to ping-pong paddles.

I had always considered the possiblity of carbon fiber UL ping-pong style paddles for packrafting or any UL paddling.

Anyone who has ever paddled with ping-pong paddles would probably agree.
It takes some practice, but can be quite effective on rivers.
Make sure you attach lines so you don't get seperated from them.

William Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
the paddles on 05/17/2013 17:52:57 MDT Print View

Ryan, could you tell us more about the paddles? Basic idea sounds like a good one and not too difficult to imagine a number of ways of doing it, but would be good to know what things you've tried, what worked, and what didn't work (if anything).

Thanks!

Best,

Bill

Michael Gillenwater
(mwgillenwater) - M

Locale: Seattle area
Re: the paddles on 05/17/2013 18:08:43 MDT Print View

Anyone have experience with these?

http://www.alpackaraft.com/index.cfm/store.catalog?CategoryID=56&ProductID=160

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Re: Re: the paddles on 05/17/2013 18:20:16 MDT Print View

Re: Anyone have experience with these?

I had considered this concept, but there is a problem with the strain on the joint that makes it unusable for sprinting. And let face it, there are times when you are going to have to haul ass.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: the paddles on 05/17/2013 18:44:30 MDT Print View

Anyone have experience with these?
Here

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Paddle Blades on 05/18/2013 19:27:24 MDT Print View

"Anyone have experience with these?"
I bought some a year or so but haven't had them on the water yet. They are small - quite a bit smaller than you're likely envisioning and also quite soft/flexy. For covering distance on flatwater or river use that requires control they'd be unsuitable. They're a neat niche item though.

Edited by dandydan on 05/18/2013 19:37:25 MDT.

Ron Babington
(Ohbejoyful) - MLife

Locale: Greenville, SC
Niner Air9 on 05/19/2013 21:05:36 MDT Print View

@boss, happy to. I'll post pics and a build list early next week in this space.