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electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many?
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jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/11/2013 19:21:43 MDT Print View

Electrolyte replacement capsules are so much lighter than powdered mixes that I bought a bottle of Salt Stick caps at REI. These have calcium, magnesium, chloride, sodium and potassium at a very low percentage of daily value. I guess the idea is to take a number of these capsules over time; you don't want to inundate your system with a lot of sodium and chloride at once. Right? (Not a rhetorical question; I actually don't know.)

The instructions say : take a capsule every 30 to 60 minutes up to 10 capsules a day during exercise.

So how many capsules do you really take? I can't imagine drinking 5 or 10 powdered mixes a day. But it would be easy to take 5 or more of these capsules. Obviously there are a lot of variables at play here, but as a baseline, assuming you were to backpack 10 miles with 2,000 feet of elevation gain and loss over 8 hours in the Sierra in summer with a 22 lb. pack--ballpark figure here--how many capsules do you take?

Also, assume that you eat a Mountain House dehydrated meal for dinner, with all of its salts; and tamari nuts for lunch. And jerky. And you drink a ton of water, which maybe is irrelevant to this question.

I understand that there are lots of other variables involved, but again, I'm looking at ballpark numbers just to get started. I don't want to overdo the salts, although that's not at all a health issue with me. But I tend to sweat a lot, so I need some kind of electrolyte replacement.

I'm probably over thinking this. Anyway, I'm guessing 3 capsules, unless it's really hot.

Cramps aren't an issue for me.

Rex Sanders
(Rex) - M

Locale: Central California Coast
Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/11/2013 19:44:21 MDT Print View

I've been using Salt Stick Caps and Salt Stick Caps Plus (with caffeine!) for day hiking and backpacking since last year.

How many? It depends.

If I'm sweating a lot during the hike (most hikes with air temps above 60° F), I take one capsule per hour. For really hot or strenuous trips, that's not enough, and I'll take more at the end of the day. But the rest of my diet is pretty low in sodium/salt. I've learned the signs and symptoms of too little salt for my body, and I try to stay ahead of the game.

How much I drink is absolutely critical. For years, I though many of my symptoms (insomnia, cramps, extreme fatigue) came from too little water, so I drank even more, which made things worse. After I started taking the Salt Stick Caps, those problems have virtually ended. Sometimes I forget, and I pay the price pretty quickly.

For most people, slightly overdosing on salt for a few days or weeks will make very little difference to your health – your sweat glands and kidneys will eliminate the excess salt easily, unless you are very dehydrated. On the other hand, too little salt and/or too much water can lead to serious illness or death – see "hyponatremia".

If you are not having a problem with too little salt, you might not need electrolytes at all. I did fine without added salt or electrolytes for decades.

Others will argue from science and studies that taking electrolytes while hiking doesn't make any difference. All I know is what works for me.

You'll need to figure out what works for you.

-- Rex

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/11/2013 20:56:11 MDT Print View

"But I tend to sweat a lot, so I need some kind of electrolyte replacement."

Maybe ... depends on how much you sweat, what foods you eat. For general hiking (JMT, July, 20 to 25 miles per day) it usually isn't an issue. Read your food labels to see what you are already getting. Add potato chips to your snack list. But if things aren't working it's time to figure it out.

This Thread covers a lot of ground, and even though it is about one day events, you will learn a lot. Skip down to my (Greg Mihalik) second post, then read the rest, forward and back. And there are other electrolyte posts as well.

For a more specific answer you need to provide specific scenarios and what went wrong. Otherwise it's all just shooting in the dark. Just doing a "capsule count" is a waste of time and money, as most are way to low in essentials to accomplish anything (except drain your bank account.)

As mentioned, this is an individual thing that you will have to work out by trial and error.

Edited by greg23 on 05/12/2013 10:25:24 MDT.

Gregory Allen
(Gallen1119) - M

Locale: Golden, CO
Re: Re: Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/11/2013 21:45:31 MDT Print View

Drink when you are thirsty and supplement with food (simple carbs especially) during exercise. Do not over hydrate! Hypotonic drinks, which water, sports drinks, and add-in powders are, can be dangerous.

Considering reading, although it is admittedly a very tough read (many references and somewhat biased), this book by Noakes, http://www.amazon.com/Waterlogged-Serious-Problem-Overhydration-Endurance/dp/145042497X. It will dramitically change your views on hydration and electrolyte suppliments. We have, and still are, being duped by the sports drink industry, especially the Gatorade Sports Science Institute (GSSI), and others who perform research funded by the marketing teams of this industry.

Peer-reviewed scientific studies show no evidence that short-term water and electrolyte deficiencies play a role in decreasing performance in mild to moderate activities. Glucose has a much bigger impact on performance.

Hike your own hike (HYOH), and don't worry too much about what has been drilled into your head over the last two decades by Garorade et al. Unless you over drink, and/or have some underlying medical condition, your body will take care of the rest.

The only thing that has increased over the last 50 years in exercise physiology is the number of cases of over hydration, almost all as a result of what we have been led to believe by the marketing gurus in the sports drink industry.

Disclaimer: These comments are my personal thoughts and beliefs and are not to be a substitute for consultation with your Primary Care Provider or other medical professional.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 00:30:01 MDT Print View

> So how many capsules do you really take?
Given that 99.9% of walkers have never even heard of these things, would it be too much to suggest that they are just another marketing exercise (aka scam)?

But, it's your wallet.

Cheers

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: Re: Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 04:01:05 MDT Print View

In my experience, if I eat a balanced diet, I don't need additional electrolytes, vitamins, etc. The electrolyte supplements are nice insurance if you don't feel you are getting enough sodium, potassium, etc and I take them occasionally as extra insurance.

The best heat casualty class I ever took as an EMT was from a Grand Canyon park ranger. Per her class, they were treating heat casualties with fluids only to have the person drop again a mile or so down the trail. They realized that while they were replacing the fluids, they weren't replacing the electrolytes. They became much more successful once they started feeding their patients those nuclear orange peanut butter crackers.

I'm sure the Noakes book is interesting and that I should read it but I'm skeptical. I've dealt with many dozens of heat casualties who were hypokalemic/natremic and dehydrated but I've personally only known of two people (both dead) who dropped from drinking too much water. They were two Army SFAS candidates and the word was that they were drinking upwards of five gallons of water per day. The original report was that they died of water toxicity but follow up reports indicated it was lethal hypokalemia/natremia.

I monitor myself by keeping my urine a very pale yellow. Once I'm drinking to where it's perfectly clear, I find that I'm flushing electrolytes too quickly and start cramping. Too dark and I start suffering mild dehydration symptoms.

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 10:39:05 MDT Print View

Thanks for the replies. I've never really used electrolyte supplements before except for throwing in a few packages of powdered mixes on some earlier trips, which I'd drink at the end of the day. But since they weigh a bit I've stopped using them. I've also not ever "bonked" from loss of salts, as far as I know. But I like the idea of these capsules because they're so light weight and, again, hiking at altitude over miles in summer suggests electrolyte loss.

I never add salt to my food or eat potato chips etc. so I'm not exactly swimming in the stuff to begin with.

By the way, by "tons of water" I mean a liter an hour while hiking, and more at camp. Given how difficult it is to filter water while backpacking, I think that de-hydration is a bigger issue than drinking too much water, for me at least. The color of my pee confirms this.

Greg: thanks for the link. There is a lot of good info there. I am surprised at the low levels of minerals and salts in these capsules. I know, maybe it's to make you take more. But again, maybe you don't want to absorb too much at once while still exercising?

Another recent thread was about a 50 mile or so day hike with a huge elevation gain/loss. Some experienced posters there advocated electrolytes. It's sort of what got me thinking.

Rex, it sure looks like these capsules help you. I'm going to try them.

Edited by book on 05/12/2013 13:41:08 MDT.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 14:07:30 MDT Print View

"Given that 99.9% of walkers have never even heard of these things, would it be too much to suggest that they are just another marketing exercise (aka scam)?"

+1

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
electrolyte on 05/12/2013 15:07:52 MDT Print View

I like Sqwincher lite kwik sticks.
They arent heavy at all. These are about 0.1 oz each. I use a couple per day.

Makes water taste better, like gatorade. Gets rid of AM chlorine taste. I drink more when I use them.

doesnt hurt I can get them from work either.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 15:57:54 MDT Print View

> by "tons of water" I mean a liter an hour while hiking, and more at camp
Blimey!!!!
Sue and I might drink 2 - 3 litres per day, total, while walking. We feel just fine thank you.
OK - another litre each in the really hot Australian summer.

Cheers

Edited by rcaffin on 05/12/2013 15:58:44 MDT.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 19:13:38 MDT Print View

Here is an excellent summary of losses due to sweat.

Arnie Baker is a Doc, and a cyclist. He's been doing this stuff for a long time.

I personally don't think that with general hiking electrolyte loss is much of an issue.
But it will be if you are doing the JMT as a 5 day Ultra. Or the Rae Lakes Loop in a day.

YMMV

Edited by greg23 on 05/12/2013 19:27:14 MDT.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Nick and Roger on 05/12/2013 20:00:09 MDT Print View

Whether or not someone needs electrolytes will depend greatly on the type of trip they are doing. I would agree that the vast majority of hikers don't need any special foods or supplements. But many that go out and do higher mile or under more extreme conditions will get benefit from electrolytes. I used to get major leg cramps every night prior to taking electrolyte capsules. If I take them I never get them. On my thru hike I had cramps two nights....the two nights I ran out.

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 20:20:59 MDT Print View

Again, thanks for your responses.

Roger: yeah, a liter an hour is what I decided I'd like to aim for this season; I've never actually achieved that. But many consider that kind of water intake to be standard in the conditions that a hiker in the Sierra encounters. I'll take your point that it may be overkill. On your side, however: 2-3 liters per day, total? That seems a bit low. Anyway, it's not a competition. I'm older than you and maybe hike at higher elevations; not as fit, although I'm not a schlub. Maybe this accounts for the difference. Older, less fit bodies doubtless require more water than you and your mate.

I by no means am doing endurance hikes. And as I wrote in my earlier posts, I've never really bonked from salt loss. I just thought, for $8.25 for a bottle, these electrolyte capsules might be a good deal. Rex has certainly found them to be helpful.
Others on this forum have written in their favor.

Here's an excerpt from the article Greg referenced:

"For aerobic-endurance athletes, it is reasonable to plan on an
intake of up to a maximum of one gram (1,000 milligrams) of
sodium per liter of fluid loss. This is about one-half teaspoon of salt.
Cyclists may have a relatively easy time ingesting sodium
snacks. Triathletes can ingest salt snacks while cycling. Runners tend
to have finished their event before trouble with sodium sets in.

Walkers, in the heat for many hours,are the most at risk, especially
if they rely only on gels and water for their event nutrition.
Here is another reason for consuming salt: It helps the body
rehydrate."

Again, I'm not an athlete in an event, just a regular backpacker. Still maybe a couple of capsules weighing about .008 oz per day may help me feel better. Maybe not! My wallet will survive.

Greg, I'm curious as to whether water loss through breathing is taken into account in this study. It's hard to picture a liter of sweat, but if you include water loss through breathing as well, it adds up.

Bill Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
Re: Re: Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 20:24:08 MDT Print View

Thanks, Greg, for Baker's summary. It is indeed a nice one.

It's not hard to see why some people may "need" some type of electrolyte supplementation while others wouldn't.

A liter/hour of water is a *lot* of water, similar to what competitive cyclists might consume during a race. If that much volume is being lost in sweat, that's going to be a lot of sodium to replace - it's not hard to imagine getting too little sodium unless consuming some salty foods.

IMO, key to Baker's summary recommendation wrt potassium is the consumption of real food. If I eat 500 calories worth of dried fruit, that's ~ 1.5 grams of potassium. 500 calories of nuts, about 1/2 gram of potassium. Together, about as much potassium as 30 Salt Stick tablets.

People who don't eat real food (during race-pace activities or for whatever other reasons) can easily *not* be getting enough potassium (or possibly other things that might matter), so it's easy to see why they might need tabs to replace some of what's missing.

Cheers,

Bill S.

PS (as edit) - if those nuts were unsalted, then the fruit and nuts might have provided as little as 20 *milligrams* of sodium, 1/10 the amount of a single salt stick capsule! And if that's how you ate for an extended period in hot conditions, you'd be in trouble before too long. OTOH, if your 500 calorie snack was 1 1/2 ramen noodle packs with the flavor packets, you got ~ 2 grams of sodium, or about ten salt sticks' worth. (I'm doing a lot of rounding here, so if you want precision, you know what to do.) Real food doesn't tend to have much sodium, unless salt has been added. That's why the mountain goats will follow you.

Edited by sbill9000 on 05/12/2013 21:05:11 MDT.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/12/2013 20:34:03 MDT Print View

"IMO, key to Baker's summary recommendation wrt potassium is the consumption of real food. If I eat 500 calories worth of dried fruit, that's ~ 1.5 grams of potassium. 500 calories of nuts, about 1/2 gram of potassium. Together, about as much potassium as 30 Salt Stick tablets."

ahhh, ...the light goes on.



"...I'm curious as to whether water loss through breathing is taken into account in this study."

I don't have a clue. Google is your friend. But whatever you find is probably irrelevant in terms of how YOU handle hydration.

As noted above, urine color is a good indicator, as is frequency. If you are peeing clear, you are probably drinking to much. If peeing dark and infrequently, then not enough. Adjust accordingly.

This is the "get to know your body" part of training. We are all unique when it comes to hydration, electrolytes, fuel, function, and emotion.

Edited by greg23 on 05/12/2013 20:35:56 MDT.

Bill Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
sweat vs breathing on 05/12/2013 20:45:08 MDT Print View

"...I'm curious as to whether water loss through breathing is taken into account in this study."

He was focused on the electrolyte balance, so he didn't need to look at breathing per se. Water is lost through breathing, but electrolyte loss is negligible.

If you want to look at overall fluid balance, then you have to take into account losses through breathing, too.

Cheers,

Bill S.

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
"electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many?" on 05/12/2013 20:46:45 MDT Print View

Interesting, I thought we were aiming at clear urine. That's why I thought I was under-hydrated: yellow urine. Good news if yellow is mellow.

Bill Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
Re: "electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many?" on 05/13/2013 17:58:00 MDT Print View

"Interesting, I thought we were aiming at clear urine. That's why I thought I was under-hydrated: yellow urine."

If you google urine color chart, you'll find a number of reference charts for urine color and hydration. I recommend looking at several of them - there's quite a range, IIRC even among those that purport to be based on the same original source. Color reproduction on the web can be a little tricky.

Note that urine appearance can also be affected by diet and supplements (including vitamins), and if you're not already familiar with the difference between color and clarity, be sure to look into that, too. Clear is not the same thing as colorless.

Best,

Bill S.

Yes 1000
(mamamia)
Took 2 tablets on 05/15/2013 17:28:21 MDT Print View

On a recent 3 day trip here in SOuthren Oregon ( peal temps ranging till 80-85F ) I felt severe headache on day One. For Second adn Third day, I started I took 2 salt stick tablets and felt fine with appropriate hydration.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: electrolyte supplements---capsules in particular--how many? on 05/15/2013 18:23:31 MDT Print View

"Still maybe a couple of capsules weighing about .008 oz per day may help me feel better. Maybe not! My wallet will survive."

Why not add 1/4 tsp of Mortons Lite Salt to each liter of water consumed? It supplies ~280 mg of sodium and 350 mg of potassium. An 8 oz canister costs around $2. This method will allow your wallet to not only survive, but thrive. ;o)

Rex Sanders
(Rex) - M

Locale: Central California Coast
Morton's Lite Salt - be careful on 05/15/2013 20:59:29 MDT Print View

"Why not add 1/4 tsp of Mortons Lite Salt to each liter of water consumed? It supplies ~280 mg of sodium and 350 mg of potassium."

Be careful with high-potassium formulas:

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1364/can-salt-substitute-kill-you

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/salt-substitutes/

"Check with your doctor before trying a potassium-based salt substitute. Most people can tolerate extra potassium, and actually need more of this mineral. But extra potassium can be dangerous for people who have trouble flushing out any excess or who are taking medications that can increase potassium levels in the bloodstream. This includes people with diabetes or kidney disease, those who have had a blocked urinary flow, or those taking a potassium-sparing diuretic, an ACE inhibitor, or an angiotensin-receptor blocker."

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Morton's Lite Salt - be careful on 05/16/2013 02:48:29 MDT Print View

The straight dope article is ridiculous.

spelt with a t
(spelt) - F

Locale: SW/C PA
Re: Morton's Lite Salt - be careful on 05/16/2013 07:13:43 MDT Print View

Soups and such flavored with sea salt have the same hidden problem: salts other than sodium chloride and consequently higher levels of K, Mg, etc.

/OT kidney health aside

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Morton's Lite Salt - be careful on 05/16/2013 08:19:19 MDT Print View

Of course people with health issues should always consult with a doctor -- if you can find a good one.

But in the context of backpacking, where one can perspire a lot of salts and minerals, the lite salt will probably be safe for most people. Now taking it everyday while living a couch potato life is not good.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Morton's Lite Salt - be careful on 05/16/2013 16:55:07 MDT Print View

"Be careful with high-potassium formulas:"

350 mg of K X perhaps 3 liters of water/day = high K?

Bill Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
a few pinches of salt on 05/16/2013 19:40:04 MDT Print View

"Be careful with high-potassium formulas"

This is a good reminder. It's a case where "more is better" can collide calamitously with human physiology for some people.

"lite salt will probably be safe for most people"

True, but there are good and not so good ways to find out if it turns out you're not most people. (And all of us are not most people in at least some ways, whether we know it or not!) Ergo the wisdom of:

"people with health issues should always consult with a doctor."

Even if they don't know they have health issues! (Hmmm, but how do I know whether ... unless ...? Hmmm.)

"350 mg of K X perhaps 3 liters of water/day = high K?"

Well, considering that grape juice has about 600 mg/liter, 350 mg/liter doesn't sound so awful. OTOH, the guy who's drinking 10+ liters of water/day would be taking in a lot of potassium. As others have pointed out, certain conditions or medications can impair potassium excretion to the extent that the relevant people are restricted wrt consumption of certain real foods, let alone potassium chloride nearly straight up. IMO, it's really not a good idea to use it casually in quantities that would exceed normal levels of intake from a diet of real food, and even that may be more than is healthy for some people.

"sea salt (has) the same hidden problem: salts other than sodium chloride and consequently higher levels of K, Mg, etc"

Well, there's good news and bad news about that - sea salt's basically the same as regular salt from a dietary standpoint (see, e.g., http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sea-salt/AN01142). The other minerals are present largely at trace levels. Even the sea salts with the highest potassium content only have a few % (I'll update this with hard numbers from the paper if people desire) - you'd need to eat about a tbsp of high potassium sea salt (containing > 5 *grams* of sodium) to get as much potassium as a serving of dried plums has.

And just for completeness, I've come back to dried fruit several times as a relevant comparison, but dried fruit is on the limited consumption list for people on potassium-restricted diets.

Best,

Bill S.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: a few pinches of salt on 05/16/2013 20:54:25 MDT Print View

"OTOH, the guy who's drinking 10+ liters of water/day would be taking in a lot of potassium."

For the guy who drinks 10 liters of water a day in all but the most extreme circumstances, an excess of potassium would be the least of his troubles. Think hyponatremia? In any case, 10 X 350 mg = 3500 mg, still less than the recommended daily intake of K.

"As others have pointed out, certain conditions or medications can impair potassium excretion to the extent that the relevant people are restricted wrt consumption of certain real foods, let alone potassium chloride nearly straight up."

One would think such people would be aware enough of their situation to avoid electrolyte supplementation in any form. Why take the exception and use it to argue that most people should avoid a cheap, simple means of taking in a modest amount of sodium and potassium when exercising for an extended period? The daily intake recommendation for potassium is around 4000 mg, so 350 mg X 3 liters of water, a fairly average amount for most hikers, is hardly "straight up".

Bill Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
Re: Re: a few pinches of salt on 05/17/2013 04:22:27 MDT Print View

"For the guy who drinks 10 liters of water a day in all but the most extreme circumstances, an excess of potassium would be the least of his troubles. Think hyponatremia?"

Using your recommended Morton's Lite, the 3 grams of sodium (plus whatever's in his diet) should take care of that, right?

"In any case, 10 X 350 mg = 3500 mg, still less than the recommended daily intake of K"

The recommended amount for most people, but not including what's in his diet. Others' diets will differ, but quick calcs show that I take in ~ 5-8 grams/day of potassium from food when backpacking.

"One would think such people would be aware enough of their situation to avoid electrolyte supplementation in any form."

One might, but not everyone has particulary good access to medical care, and even among those who do, not all take advantage of it. In some surveys, about a third of people report that they don't regularly or ever see a doctor. People can have significant health changes and not be aware of them.

"Why take the exception and use it to argue that most people should avoid a cheap, simple means of taking in a modest amount of sodium and potassium when exercising for an extended period?"

That was not *at all* my intent. If my comments read that way, then I have expressed myself poorly. Indeed, I'd argue that most people *should* be supplementing with modest amount of sodium and potassium while exercising for extended periods if they're not getting adequate amounts already from their diets.

"The daily intake recommendation for potassium is around 4000 mg, so 350 mg X 3 liters of water, a fairly average amount for most hikers, is hardly "straight up"."

By "straight up," I refer to the supplement itself, which is nearly 50% KCl. Due to the high concentration, its potential for misuse is significantly greater than that of most other dietary potassium sources. If used as you suggest, it will cause no harm to most people. (And indeed I have used it myself that way, during conditions when I wasn't eating real food with plenty of it.)

Bill S.

Rex Sanders
(Rex) - M

Locale: Central California Coast
Thermotabs instead of Saltstick caps on 05/20/2013 22:40:18 MDT Print View

Thermotabs might be a cheaper alternative to Saltstick Caps.

Thermotabs: 180 mg Sodium, 15 mg Potassium, about 10 cents each.

Saltstick Caps: 215 mg Sodium, 63 mg Potassium, 100 IU Vitamin D, and small amounts of a few other minerals, 20 cents each retail.

Vitamin D RDA is 600 IU for adults, Tolerable Upper Intake Level is 4,000 IU daily for adults (NIH).

Saltstick Caps Plus: 190 mg Sodium, 53 mg Potassium, 100 IU Vitamin D, 30 mg caffeine, and small amounts of a few other minerals, 30 cents each retail.

For comparison, a tall Starbucks coffee has 260 mg caffeine.

So if I switched to Thermotabs, I'd take about the same number as Saltstick Caps Plus. But I'd miss the caffeine :-(

-- Rex

Edited by Rex on 05/20/2013 22:45:47 MDT.

Kyle Meyer
(kylemeyer) - M

Locale: Portland, OR
Electrolytes on 05/22/2013 09:43:04 MDT Print View

I just wanted to pop into this thread to remind everyone that Potassium and Sodium are not the only electrolytes necessary for proper muscle function. Personally, while I don't steadily dose electrolytes, I have Hammer Endurolytes in a small bag and will take one during big hill climbs (say more than 3000' of sustained elevation change), both up and down. I find that it greatly helps my recovery even while eating normal, healthy trail food.

A small supplement not intended to replace your primary source of nutrition is an easy insurance policy against feeling like hell. Worth it, in my opinion.