CB3/Cloudburst 3 Initial impressions
Display Avatars Sort By:
oliver hulland
(oli_h)
Whoa! Space to spare! on 06/08/2013 08:49:22 MDT Print View

I just received my Cloudburst 3 earlier this week, and just had a spare moment to pitch it for the first time since it's stopped raining. And all I can say is HOLY COW. It's an absolute palace. First impressions are really really positive.

The only other Tarptent I have experience with is the Squall (which I used for a week with a friend on the AT). Setup is similarly easy. The biggest and most immediate difference is the amount of usable space in the Cloudburst 3. In the Squall, in order to sit upright I was limited to the 18-24 inches near the door (shorter people would have more room, but I'm 6'3"). With the Cloudburst 3, there is no such limitation. If you're at all claustrophobic, the Cloudburst 3 will be a breath of fresh air. The dual entry will also be huge on bug-free nights.

I ordered the extra pole in case I end up doing some winter camping, and I figured it's best to have an extra in case something breaks. It's well done, and at least on my tent the third pole is affixed by grommets. I also haven't had any problems (so far) with the sleeves that the primary two poles slip into.
Cloudburst 3
Henry has squeezed every last drop of usable space out of the design, and given that it weighs the same as my last Ultralight 2-person tent, I'm over the moon.

oliver hulland
(oli_h)
Keeping the sides up on 06/08/2013 08:54:19 MDT Print View

I forgot to mention that though Henry mentions that you can roll the sides up for easy venting I've noticed, like Diego, they won't stay up. I think this could be fixed with a few plastic snaps that snap onto the poles (like those found on rain flies) to prevent the fabric from sliding back down.

J C
(Joomy) - M
Interesting but on 06/08/2013 21:49:28 MDT Print View

Seems like there's a few bugs in the design still to be sorted out? Or are people just not able to work out all the features yet?

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Interesting but on 06/08/2013 22:03:05 MDT Print View

I would definitely love to see it with a separate inner.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: Re: Interesting but on 06/08/2013 23:13:19 MDT Print View

I bet it'd add another 1.5lbs.

It would be awesome though. Would you need a liner with that too? Solid top?

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Interesting but on 06/09/2013 02:37:01 MDT Print View

I don't think it would add that much weight as it already has a ground sheet and end walls, I say it would add less than a pound.

I asked Henry had he plans to do one and he said no.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Interesting but on 06/09/2013 02:37:01 MDT Print View

Double post.

Edited by stephenm on 06/09/2013 02:37:33 MDT.

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
Re: Re: Re: Re: Interesting but on 06/09/2013 05:32:22 MDT Print View

I was under the impression that a solid inner was in the works to make the CB3 a double walled winter shelter. In fact I was counting on it.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Interesting but on 06/09/2013 09:47:46 MDT Print View

A solid inner will be available,.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Interesting but on 06/09/2013 10:16:29 MDT Print View

Diego,

The solid need will just be a ripstop insert that's hung from the walls.

oliver hulland
(oli_h)
Seam sealing and thunderstorms on 06/11/2013 11:36:17 MDT Print View

I live just outside Baltimore and we had some truly gnarly weather the past few days. Nearly 4" of rain fell in a two or three hour period.

As it happens, the day before I had seam sealed the tent and left it to dry. By the time I came out to break it down, the rain had started to fall so instead of having a sopping wet tent on the porch, I just left it up until the sun came back. I can say with certainty that the tent handled it admirably. With that in mind, there are three places where you're going to want to spend a little bit more time seam sealing, and that's where Henry has sewn in three circular patches with velcro to hold on the third pole. This was literally the only place where water got in despite nearly 36 hours of constant heavy downpour. Also the sides of the tent extending almost all the way to the ground means that there is little to no splashing. We had flashfloods, and there was a torrent of water flowing underneath, but it stayed dry. I spent a bit of time in the tent for fun, and was impressed with how much ventilation can be achieved by leaving the vestibules mostly open on one side, and just partially open on the other (that way you can keep your gear on one side.

Something else is that this morning when I went to go out and check, a significant amount of condensation had formed (because I had closed both vestibules and we had a pretty significant change in temperature and humidity). But after shaking it around almost none had fallen to the floor. I think this is in part due to two design elements. The first is minimal seams that act as collecting points, and the second is the vertical walls.

Anyway, I'm really really impressed with this tent and am excited to take it backpacking this summer. If anybody wants to see other features/pictures let me know and I'll snap a few after my second round of seamsealing dries this afternoon (I just touched up the three spots mentioned earlier).

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
Re: Seam sealing and thunderstorms on 06/11/2013 12:09:52 MDT Print View

Those 3 circles are exactly where I had to go back a put on more sealer. Also the vent area where the stitching runs vertically towards the bottom was a problem spot.

We had major rain over the weekend too and not a drop reached the inside. Handles wind great also.

Still waiting for wether or not the 18 inch poles are available on the CB3 and if they will come in carbon fiber. Havnt heard anything back from Henry.

The only other issue ive had, and its quite frustrating, is the sleeves allowing the poles to slip while setting up. Needs grommets instead I think.

Overall very pleased with the CB3

J C
(Joomy) - M
Re: Re: Seam sealing and thunderstorms on 06/15/2013 20:33:50 MDT Print View

So has anyone figured out how to make the sliding walls stay up? I feel that for the Australian summer heat that would be a nice feature.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Re: Re: Re: Seam sealing and thunderstorms on 06/15/2013 23:19:56 MDT Print View

Is there not a mitten clip? My Scarp has em

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
follow up on 07/15/2013 17:39:40 MDT Print View

I recently had to send my CB3 in for a repair. While it was in the shop, Henry fixed my only real complaint about it. He was able to adjust the sleeves where the poles insert so they no longer slip out while setting up. I thing the stitching was adjusted to make a tighter fit. Anyways, great service and great shelter.

Henry Shires
(07100) - F - M
Re: follow up on 07/16/2013 08:11:59 MDT Print View

> He was able to adjust the sleeves where the poles insert so they no longer slip out while setting up.

Just FYI, the CB3 pole sleeve straps are now manufactured that way with the strap coming off the pole pocket about 1/2" up from the bottom. That prevents slip (and is how we do it on the Moment DW and Rainbow/Double Rainbow as well). There are also elastic loops at each of the 4 interior corners for lifting the canopy edge up to the adjacent interior clip and holding it there for sidewall ventilation and views.

-H

Dave T
(DaveT) - F
shires on 07/16/2013 09:55:16 MDT Print View

More great work from Henry Shires.

Nice!

Sara Marchetti
(smarchet) - MLife
Re: CB3/Cloudburst 3 Initial impressions on 07/16/2013 10:11:14 MDT Print View

I would love to hear more comparisons to the Rainshadow 2 (which I now own). The big tradeoff I see is the footprint vs. headroom. The RS2 with a slightly bigger footprint and the CB3 with more consistent headroom (along the length). After that, it is convenient entry (CB3 with double entries) and weight (RS2 coming in a bit lighter). Any other thoughts. I'm wondering if there are enough benefits that would warrant an upgrade.

diego dean
(cfionthefly) - M
Re: Re: follow up on 07/16/2013 11:02:42 MDT Print View

Thanks Henry...

I didnt notice the elastic loops to hold up the sidewalls, so I guess i have another excuse to go set it up in the yard!

Adrian B
(adrianb) - MLife

Locale: Auckland, New Zealand
adrianb on 08/03/2013 22:52:23 MDT Print View

>I would love to hear more comparisons to the Rainshadow 2

I've been thinking the same things, since I also have a RS2. Differences that appeal to me:
- more and better pegging options - the RS2 suffers from only a single peg at the back, which can get a lot of strain when trying to get a taut pitch.
- even without the third pole it looks more wind stable than the RS2.
- looks like it has better options for hanging lights/clothes from the roof, this is something I miss in the RS2.
- entry ways are not blocked by hiking poles, and there are 2
- two vestibules, rather than one (the rear mesh of the RS2 cannot be unzipped)

Tempting!