Bomber Trekking Poles...
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Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/20/2013 23:36:20 MDT Print View

This is the continuation of a thread I started regarding utilizing an inverted V w/trekking poles for an MLD Supermid. My rational was why not maximize the sleeping space in the mid if I were to share a double quilt with my son. I suspect there would still be enough room with the pole in the middle, or even offset a bit, but wanted to explore alternatives.

Anxious to see if this was a viable option, I contacted Ron with MLD. He was very kind to respond, stating that this could be done, but proceed cautiously due to the additional stress on the poles due to length and angle. He also said to utilize a very strong trekking pole. I then considered purchasing the .600 CF poles from Ruta Locura/Ti Goat, but that would defeat the purpose of keeping things light, and still using trekking poles to hike with.

I am no expert in the UL community, but I think it would be safe to say a CF pole may not handle a load as well as an aluminum one. If this is not accurate, please point me in the right direction. I spent some time perusing REI, and found the Black Diamond Trail Ergo Cork Trekking Poles. They are reasonably priced, weigh a bit over 1#, and had high ratings.

I think a more robust/heavier trekking pole will need to be a compromise I make if I continue down this road. So my question is, are these poles one of the stronger ones on the market, and if not, any other suggestions?

I appreciate any thoughts you may have on this topic.

Regards,

Chris

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/20/2013 23:58:34 MDT Print View

The Black Diamond Trail poles will serve you well. For that matter, I think any of the BD flick lock poles will work just fine. Don't bother with any anti-shock features.

I do prefer poles with an extended grip for on the fly grip changes going up a big step, etc, but that is a lower priority. Cork is okay, but the foam style grips like the BD Trail poles work for me. Ergonomic angled grips don't do much for me, so I can pass in the expense. Straight grips make for better tent poles anyway, IMHO.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
re: v poles in mid on 04/21/2013 07:32:11 MDT Print View

To do this with a larger mid you'll need poles in the 70-80+ inch range, assuming a peak height of 60+ inches. Solidity aside, I know of no trekking (or ski, for that matter) poles this long.

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Poles on 04/21/2013 07:41:07 MDT Print View

With Gossamer Gear's LT4 poles, you can insert the lower section of one pole into the top of the handle of the other pole, thus making it a 3 section monster that is amply long. The problems are that you can only make one frankenpole per set, and that it likely fails your 'bomber' requirements.

I mention this because you may be able to find another stiffer 2 section pole where a cap on the handle can be removed (or a hole drilled) so that the other lower than be inserted. If you and your hiking partner each used these then you could create 2 monster poles, or you could use one of these plus one dedicated shelter pole.

Adam Rothermich
(aroth87) - F

Locale: Missouri Ozarks
Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/21/2013 08:17:41 MDT Print View

If you want bomber trekking poles I think I own them. They're a pair of Leki Ultralite Titaniums. I slipped on ice about 5 years ago and bent the lower section of one pair about 20 degrees. Luckily it was bent at the joint so I pulled it out, stuck it in my slats of my back deck and bent it back mostly straight. It was a little deformed so I had to jam it back into the other section pretty hard but it hasn't moved in the 5 years since.

Then this past weekend I extended the upper section of the same pole only to find the lock wasn't working. I was bummed that after all these years I'd finally broken the poles but when I got home I pulled it apart and after a little work with some needle nose pliers was able to free whatever had jammed the lock up. So I'm back to two working poles.

I've used them for vaulting over creeks, setting up my tarp, moving branches and snakes off the trail, and they just keep going. I'd love to have some uberlight carbon fiber poles but not until I wear these out!

Picture of pole after accident:

From Bent pole


Adam

Edited by aroth87 on 04/21/2013 08:18:30 MDT.

Clayton Mauritzen
(GlacierRambler) - F - M

Locale: NW Montana
Re: Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/21/2013 08:55:12 MDT Print View

Two things: first go with some set of flick-lock poles. I've tried Black Diamond and Leki, and I found the Black Diamond to be more impressive for the weight.

Second, make sure your hiking partner is carrying similar poles, and simply remove a section or two (with the flick-locks, they just pull right out), and use the one that your pole tips fit into the tightest.

Now you have a pole this is eighteen or so inches longer and no need for a pole extender. If that's not long enough, then keep two sections together.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/21/2013 10:00:06 MDT Print View

They should make a set of poles with unequal length sections on either side. So when you put them together you get an extra long pole.

Elliott Wolin
(ewolin) - MLife

Locale: Hampton Roads, Virginia
RE: Bomber Trekking Poles.. on 04/21/2013 14:54:10 MDT Print View

I've had similar experiences with my 3-piece twist-lock Komperdell Titanal poles I bought way back in 2006. We've bent them on a number of occasions and just pulled them apart, carefully applied pressure to straigten the bent pole, then put them back together. They weigh about 16oz a pair. I'll replace them when they break, but that doesn't seem to be forthcoming.

Note...I've had little problem with the twist-locks. I just keep them clean and chedk them maybe once per hour when hiking. I imagine the clamp style lock works better, but I have no complaints.

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/21/2013 16:57:52 MDT Print View

Hi Dale,

Thanks for your thoughts, flick lock, straight grip, non-shock, and foam grips are on the feature list!

Regards,
Chris

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: re: v poles in mid on 04/21/2013 17:00:56 MDT Print View

Hi David,

I figured on 2 sets of poles, so thinking that may work?

Chris

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: Poles on 04/21/2013 17:07:17 MDT Print View

Dan,

I was planning on having a second pair of poles available, used by my son. I was thinking of purchasing two identical pairs, both relativity strong.

Regards,
Chris

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/21/2013 17:11:03 MDT Print View

Hi Adam,

Thanks for your thoughts! I will take a look at the Leki poles, although not sure about the twist locks. I currently have a pair with twist locks, and sometimes find them to be a bit of a pain.

Have a great evening!

Regards,

Chris

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: Re: Re: Bomber Trekking Poles... on 04/21/2013 17:12:43 MDT Print View

Clayton,

Think I am headed in that direction!

Thanks for your thoughts.

Regards,

Chris

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: RE: Bomber Trekking Poles.. on 04/21/2013 17:15:04 MDT Print View

Hi Elliott,

Another vote for twist locks and Titanium. looks like I need to compare!

Thanks for your thoughts!

Regards,

Chris

A W
(lost_01)
Re: Poles on 04/21/2013 18:48:48 MDT Print View

related note: any word on when Gossamer Gear poles will come available?

edit: the adjustable ones I mean

Edited by lost_01 on 04/21/2013 19:25:52 MDT.

Dustin Short
(upalachango) - MLife
Re: Re: RE: Bomber Trekking Poles.. on 04/21/2013 19:13:38 MDT Print View

Just to clarify, it's Titanal...as in Titan-AL aka some super duper aluminum alloy that has (and definitely not a tit-anal amalgamation). The poles aren't actually made of titanium (sneaky marketing department toeing the line of false advertisement). Titanal doesn't even have titanium as an alloying metal from what I could find. Still good poles just don't think you're buying titanium. To my knowledge there are no titanium poles on the market.

Chris Murdock
(emandchris) - F

Locale: North East Georgia
Re: Re: Re: RE: Bomber Trekking Poles.. on 04/21/2013 19:39:27 MDT Print View

Proves one of two things, either the slick marketing tactic works, or my secondary education was lacking...I bet the former, they had me!

Thanks for the clarification Dustin!

Adam Rothermich
(aroth87) - F

Locale: Missouri Ozarks
Re: Re: Re: RE: Bomber Trekking Poles.. on 04/21/2013 20:32:39 MDT Print View

Dustin I hold no illusion that the poles are actually made of titanium! My poles certainly say titanium on them but that probably just refers to the color. I'd suspect if there were any titanium used the poles wouldn't weigh 15 oz for the pair. Regardless, I'd say aluminum poles will be more "bomber" than carbon fiber. If I'd have taken the same tumble that bent my aluminum poles with carbon fiber wonderpoles I'd have ended up with a shattered pole and not a deformed one. Ski poles would probably be even sturdier than adjustable trekking poles if you're looking for something fool-proof.

As for twist vs flick locking, my Leki poles and Gitzo tripod both have twist locks so I'm used to it. If I were planning on making lots of adjustments I'd probably go for flicklock but as it is I usually set my poles at the beginning of the day and leave them that way until I get to camp where they get adjusted to erect my tarp. Twisting isn't too much of a hassle to do twice a day. I've never had a section slip and I've used them for vaulting many creeks.

Adam

Ian B.
(IDBLOOM) - MLife

Locale: PNW
BD carbon corks on 04/21/2013 22:54:42 MDT Print View

I haven't owned them long enough to do a proper review on them but they were one of a few recommended by Skurka in his book and so far they have lived up to their bomber reputation.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: BD carbon corks on 04/22/2013 11:29:02 MDT Print View

I have a pair of the BD Alpine Carbon Cork poles and they work well, but they aren't very light at 17.8oz. The aluminum Trail model poles are just a fraction of an ounce heavier per pair and cost 30% less. Where these carbon poles stand out is for beach hiking-- they don't corrode. IMHO, any of the BD aluminum poles are strong enough and it comes down to personal preference for grips and straps. The elliptical poles are really stout, but I don't see the need for the greater expense and weight. I do like the extended foam grips for a quick grab lower on the pole.

Josh Brock
(needsAbath)

Locale: Outside
bd with shocks on 04/22/2013 11:38:29 MDT Print View

I just returned my BD carbon poles in favor of my old BDs with the shocks. I love those things and did not like the cork handles on the new ones or the lack of a shock which I apparently had grown accustom to.

Rudy Hassall
(WindedBowhunter) - F

Locale: MidAtlantic
Exped Explorer 130 SA on 04/22/2013 18:30:05 MDT Print View

I have had great success with my Exped Explorer 130 SA Trekking Poles. I have carried some precious cargo in on back for over 12 miles. I have carried my son in a child carrier and relied heavily on these poles, especially coming down the mountain.

I have used these poles on hunts, AT jaunts and family trips. I have never had them fail on me, they compress down to fit instide a airline carry-on backpack.

http://www.windedbowhunter.com/exped-explorer-trekking-poles/

Ciro on Daddy's back climbing Old Rag with his Exped Explorer 130 SA Poles

Edited by WindedBowhunter on 04/22/2013 18:36:02 MDT.

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Poles on 04/22/2013 19:56:38 MDT Print View

FWIW, you can take the lower section of a GG LT4 pole and toss it into a 3 piece BD pole as the bottom section (tested with the BD Alpine Carbon Cork). The advantage is that the pole can extend 10-15" longer, which may be what you need.