ZPacks Hexamid Pocket Tarp
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John Abela
(JohnAbela) - MLife
Re: Pocket Tarp on 06/16/2013 20:29:55 MDT Print View

James, I have not used it yet as it has not shown up yet. Pretty sure I was at or very near the top of the list of first order one, but you know how it goes.

I have already owned a hexamid solo and I have probably more miles on a 0.34 tarp than anybody else so I pretty much know what to expect from the shelter.

But yep, as soon as it shows up I will take photos in my backyard and maybe a walk-around video for you.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Pocket Tarp on 06/16/2013 20:58:27 MDT Print View

Hmmm, how about a hammock tarp in this stuff? With no poles for stress and a continuous ridge line, it may have less stress and it would always be in the trees for protection.

And then a matching under cover... whimper...

I think I have *socks* that weigh as much!

Sean Nordeen
(Miner) - F - M

Locale: SoCAL
ZPacks Hexamid Pocket Tarp on 08/11/2013 20:13:52 MDT Print View

I'm starting to think about getting this shelter. Given that I normally cowboy camp unless its raining and rarely setup my existing tarp, this may be very practical for my regular backpacking trips. Even on the PCT, I only setup my tarp 9 times for the entire trip.

My only question is, how would it hold up to nickle size hail coming down in a thunderstorm or handle the weight of 4 inches of snow coming down in the shoulder seasons? Just wondering if it would be practical to use say on the CT, though that may just me getting a little too ambitious in my ideas? I won't even dare suggest the CDT for it though I'd like to since I'm looking at the regular hexamid tarp for that. ;)

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
re on 08/12/2013 00:24:57 MDT Print View

It seems like for .9oz more you can get the .51, which is what I have. But for mild weather it should be plenty durable.

Sean Nordeen
(Miner) - F - M

Locale: SoCAL
Decided against the Hexamid Pocket Tarp on 09/28/2013 23:04:53 MDT Print View

Yeah, after thinking about it, for the small weight difference, the pocket version only made sense if one was getting a stripped second tarp as an emergency shelter for day hiking if they already had one for backpacking.

So I ended up going with the normal Hexamid since its a bit more durable. As its the end of the summer season, it showed up in less than 2 weeks from ordering. I'll be deliberately putting this through some bad weather between now and next spring in order to evaluate it for a potential CDT thru-hike.

As this is potentially replacing a 5+year old MLD CF tarp for me, if it wasn't lighter there would be no point in changing since my existing tarp is still good. So I ordered the hexamid stripped without the netting or beak. I figured the opening isn't any larger then I'm use to with my tarp so why bother with a beak. Plus, I figure it will cause more condensation if I actually used the beak in rain. As I normally cowboy camp and only use a tarp for rain, I'm staying with my bivy sack which eliminates the need for netting (if bugs haven't bother me in 6+ years of using a bivy, why change now) and gives some additional security against any rain coming through the opening so once again, I don't see the extra weight of the beak to be justified. Since I have plenty of the 6.5" titanium stakes already, I decided to try the lighter and thinner 6" stakes to see how they hold.

After removing the cords for the CF floor that I'm not going to use, the Regular Hexamid (with no beak or netting) + storage sack + attached guy lines + 8x 6" Ti stakes came out to weigh only 6.2oz (176g) on my scale. That's about 2oz lighter then my existing tarp setup though the tarp is heavier weight CF and uses longer stakes that are slightly heavier. It's even lighter then my 6.5oz bivy sack. It may be time to consider replacing it with the Borah CF bivy to save 2 more oz. At this rate, my wallet is going to be thin before X-mas even gets here this year. ;)