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Kate Magill
(lapedestrienne) - F
Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/16/2013 11:59:59 MDT Print View

Anyone out there able to speak to the performance of Montbell's proprietary "air-permeable waterproof fabric" used in their Rain Trekker Jacket and Pants?

http://www.montbell.us/products/techinfo/techsys/material/material09.html

They describe it as three-layer; I'm wondering specifically how this compares to eVent and Neoshell in terms of durability and comfort. Could this be a budget contender for those not keen to take the plunge on a $200-$400 shell from Rab, Montane, Westcomb, etc?

I realize it's quite a bit over the 8-oz mark, but as a 3-layer shell for $130, it seems like it could be a great alternative to proprietary 2.5-layer shell fabrics in the same price range (Precip, Hyvent, H2No, etc). Experiences?

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/16/2013 12:23:53 MDT Print View

Hi Kate,

I used it in a bivy and it was definitley not as breatable as event.

Mark Verber
(verber) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/16/2013 19:19:44 MDT Print View

I found Breeze Dry-Tec to be not as good as eVENT, in the same league as PacLite, and better than most of the other PU based fabrics. Of course, none of them compare to non waterproof / non-membrane materials when it comes to breathability and air permeability.

--

Kate Magill
(lapedestrienne) - F
breathability vs durability on 04/17/2013 17:36:02 MDT Print View

Yeah, considering the price range and the specs MB lists for Breeze Dry Tec, I wouldn't have expected it to perform as well as eVent in terms of breathability.

I've had GTX Paclite garments in the past and was impressed with their durability compared to most 2.5 layer WPB fabrics, which in my experience begin to delaminate after a year +/- of mixed usage. Not the most breathable by any means, but for most applications I find that's not a make-or-break issue. For me, relative durability is, and it seems like--in general--3 layer fabrics are the way to go for that.

Rain shells are by no means an ideal piece of ultralight backpacking kit; I recognize that in many scenarios a windshirt works better for huge weight savings, and in other situations a poncho performs better than a jacket. However, I keep burning through rain shells because I use them a lot in everyday life, and since I always have one it usually ends up in my backpack on long trips.

It's a shame Montbell doesn't have more brick-and-mortar retailers in my neck of the woods. I have trouble buying gear without being able to get a feel for it in real life first.

Edited by lapedestrienne on 04/17/2013 17:36:57 MDT.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/17/2013 18:08:19 MDT Print View

Mark and Stephen correctly evaluated and positioned the relative breathability of MP PU coatings such as MB's. In my lab tests they averaged only .17 CFM versus eVent which tested in the range of .35 to .53 CFM depending on the face fabric.

Edited by richard295 on 04/17/2013 18:09:49 MDT.

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/17/2013 18:10:09 MDT Print View

The curious thing about eVent is that, unlike GoreTex, OEMs aren't required to brand it on their garments. The OEMs are free to rename it anything they want. The OEMs like this since it allows them create their own brands. Dry Q Elite, H2NO, and even Breeze Drytec could all be eVent variations and I bet no one would be the wiser in practical use.

Edited by rmjapan on 04/17/2013 18:11:47 MDT.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/17/2013 19:51:09 MDT Print View

Rick,

I did notice a big difference between Breeze Tec and Event.

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Re: Re: Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/17/2013 20:49:19 MDT Print View

Stephen, no doubt the anecdotal evidence seems to favor eVent fabric as do some lab tests, though the latter seem to indicate the real differences may be also insignificant. But we buy finished garments, not fabric swatches, and I'd argue the design of the garment and the expected weather conditions are more important factors on how the garment feels and performs for the individual than the fabric choice.

Just like all other gear choices, if it mainly lives in the pack best to buy the lightest/least expensive kit you can with the basic utility to "git-r-done." In mid-summer I can be happy with just a cheap $2 plastic poncho if the wind is not up. But in a mid-winter blizzard at elevation I could die without a robust shell!

Edited by rmjapan on 04/18/2013 04:26:40 MDT.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: The Great Lakes Bay Region
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Montbell Breeze Dry-Tec on 04/18/2013 06:10:27 MDT Print View

Rick,

I was comparing bivys which are just fabric and a few seams, it is indeed different with jackets.

You are right about the cheap option for summer.