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Most durable, but reasonably light inflatable type pad? (yes, yet another pad thread and question)
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just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Most durable, but reasonably light inflatable type pad? (yes, yet another pad thread and question) on 04/09/2013 16:02:59 MDT Print View

I have extremely limited experience with inflatable pads so far--for a long time i used only CCF pads. I now have a Big Agnes IAC pad, which i like and use plenty, but i was just curious what folks here considered the most durable pads currently made that aren't ridiculously heavy.

I was looking at the Exped Downmat 7, but don't really know if this would be one of the better ones for that above category. I'm interested in light, but not UL for this consideration. Mainly i want/need something to last a long time with decent treatment.

Thank you for any feedback, especially experience related.

Mark Andrews
(buldogge) - F

Locale: Midwest
All Season... on 04/09/2013 16:17:11 MDT Print View

Thermarest All Season.

If you can swing the 66" length (Medium) they are only 18 oz. I use the LargeWide, but that is 25 oz.

*SPAM* I have a spare M BNIB if you're interested in trying one.

-Mark in St. Louis

Edited by buldogge on 04/09/2013 16:17:47 MDT.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: All Season... on 04/09/2013 16:21:19 MDT Print View

Thanks for the info Mark. I will consider the offer. How much are you selling it for?

(I probably could swing the 66 inch one since i'm a shade under 5'7")

Brandon =Þ
(Beeen) - MLife

Locale: California
Re: Most durable, but reasonably light inflatable type pad? (yes, yet another pad thread and question) on 04/09/2013 16:38:22 MDT Print View

I've went away from it for five years or so, but for three season camping, I went back to using the Therm-a-Rest ProLite Plus. Although, after using a RidgeRest and then a NeoAir, the ProLite seems more "reasonably heavy" than "reasonably light". However, it provides me just enough comfort to almost sleep through the night, and with some care I've managed to not yet get a leak. I think as I age though, I may look at things like the Exped DownMat to replace it, unless I figure out how to become a back sleeper (without taking a couple Tylenol PM and a glass of Scotch).

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Thermarest All-Season is Good on 04/09/2013 16:53:47 MDT Print View

If you're looking for durability, I don't think you'll necessarily find it. A balloon is a balloon. That being said, the Thermarest pads are pretty durable. I used my Thermarest All-Season for 6 months almost nonstop and it held up, even on strange surfaces like sand, dry grass, wood flooring, and rough carpet.

Now I have a Thermarest X-Therm and it seems to be thinner, but the same level of quality. Despite that, I hate blowing up thermarests, so all spring and summer I'll be using CCF. I'm an easy sleeper, not picky.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Re on 04/09/2013 17:01:23 MDT Print View

+1 on the all season. Great comfy 70d material and only 4 ounces heavier than the exped ul7.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
All season on 04/09/2013 17:04:57 MDT Print View

By the way can someone tell me what thier regular size all season weighs pad by itself?

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Most durable, but reasonably light inflatable type pad? (yes, yet another pad thread and question) on 04/09/2013 21:35:39 MDT Print View

Thanks for the suggestions everyone! Seems like so far it's NeoAir all season and some kind of Eped Downmat at the top of the list. I've read some sporadic and occasional reviews here and there of people who have had their All Season leak on them, or develop holes relatively quickly... hopefully these were just lemons or misuse and not some kind of inherent potential weakness because so far i lean to the All Season--i like how there is no traditional insulation to degrade among other things.

Either way, i have to hold off for a bit until i save up some more money. Hopefully there will be more feedback from experienced and especially more long term users meanwhile.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: Re: Re: Most durable, but reasonably light inflatable type pad? (yes, yet another pad thread and question) on 04/09/2013 21:52:18 MDT Print View

Hi Max,

Yah, i often take with me a 1/8 CCF pad as a backup for those reasons. When i was a decade younger, i didn't seem to mind sleeping on just CCF pads, not that i'm "old" now, only 33, but it seems i've lost that tolerance somewhat.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
pad on 04/09/2013 21:57:29 MDT Print View

learn to sleep on back

then the lightest smallest CCF pad is all you need.

just Justin Whitson
(ArcturusBear)
Re: pad on 04/09/2013 22:03:57 MDT Print View

Hi M.B., i appreciate the encouragement and tip, but i'm not sure that would apply in this case. I've layed just on my back, and even after 20 mins or so, things get stiff and a bit achy on the CCF pads. It's certainly doable, but not actively comfortable.

Sleep is one area wherein i will experiment with different systems, and push things a bit (like that double silk liner/Apex "bag" i made and tried), but ultimately will not compromise too much on. Good, restful sleep is just of too much value to me and my health.