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Filling a Kooka Bay mummy pad w/ Climashield
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C Bliss
(norfolk)
Filling a Kooka Bay mummy pad w/ Climashield on 04/02/2013 15:46:29 MDT Print View

As per GlacierRambler's suggestions on a separate thread, I'm interested in cutting open a recently acquired Kooka Bay mummy pad (http://cache.backpackinglight.com/backpackinglight/user_uploads/1357712665_738)and filling it with Cimashield or some other insulating material.

Having never done this before, I'm curious about the process, and am interested in any feedback/experience folks have.

From what I understand, I can just snip off the end, fill it with insulation, then seal it with a hot iron? Yes?

A few questions:

How hot does the iron need to be? Should I use any other adhesive?
What weight of Climashield should I be going for - 5 oz or 2.5 oz? I don't often camp in extreme conditions, but I do use a smallish quilt so I get cold.

Cheers!

Dustin Short
(upalachango) - MLife
Re: Filling a Kooka Bay mummy pad w/ Climashield on 04/02/2013 20:40:06 MDT Print View

Well climashield isn't loose so you'll have to cut into strips than slide it down the tubes of the mattress. Is your kookabay down filled or empty? I know bender made a lot with down so that would be warmer than any synth you fill it with.

And E
(LunchANDYnner)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
2.5 on 04/03/2013 08:18:12 MDT Print View

Go with the 2.5, the 5 is quite thick, perfect for a quilt, but too much for the pad.

C Bliss
(norfolk)
Re: 2.5 on 04/03/2013 08:33:08 MDT Print View

Excellent, thanks everyone. Obliged.

@Dustin - it's empty, no filling in there now.

With reference to the resealing, just a hot iron will work? nothing else is required?

Marc Shea
(FlytePacker) - F

Locale: Cascades
Re: Re: 2.5 on 04/03/2013 08:51:59 MDT Print View

Quest Outfitters has some tips about heat sealing fabric with an iron. As irons can vary, make sure you experiment with scraps before you proceed. Heat settings are one thing, but also the time needed to bond the fabric together is another critical piece of the equation. Trial and error, especially with a household iron, will be key in making sure you get it right.

http://www.questoutfitters.com/tips_and_hints.htm