pedometer
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larry savage
(pyeyo) - F

Locale: pacific northwest
pedometer on 04/28/2007 15:04:17 MDT Print View

So my wife corners me and asks to borrow my pedometer.
The problem is even though I'm a complete gear doggie I don't have a pedometer.
After searching the bpl website there is only one hit about losing a pedometer.[boy,there sure is a lotta stuff hidden around here]
So my question is, does anyone use a pedometer and is there one that might be recommended?

William Siemens
(alaskaman) - F
Re: pedometer on 04/29/2007 02:39:57 MDT Print View

I like pedometers - always have. Still have one of the old mechanical ones from pre-teen days. On various "walking" sites, like "walking.about" you can find reviews of what's available now. My current one is a Sportline 342. I think the company has changed its lineup, but I still see this one at Walmart and such. Anyhow, its light, and cheap, and small. Its numbers face up when its on your belt, so you can just glance down and read it. Amazing how many brands/models have a less convenient layout. I use it on all my recreational/training hikes, as its nice to set goals and go to bed knowing I did 8 miles this evening, or 50 for the week, or whatever. Pedometers really only count your steps, and you set it for your average stride and it then derives the mileage from that. Obviously if you're going up a steep hill and shorten up your stride, the pedometer will "think" you've gone farther than you have. Despite that, mine is quite accurate. I've checked it on a route that goes around a 640 acre "section" which is of course a mile on a side. The car odometer read it as one mile on a side, and the pedometer did too, although it varied about 5-7% each time I walked it. Surprisingly, gps varies more, about 10%. After seeing this question, I walked a 2 mile route 3 times - the pedometer read 1.91, 2.03, and 1.98. The GPS read 2.13, 1.99 and 1.87.
Anyhow, they're fun...I suppose not really NECESSARY. Your watch will tell you when its time to take a break, and lots of experience trying to make campsites by nightfall that are "only" 6 miles distant, will give you a pretty good idea how long it will take to get somewhere. Nevertheless I like mine. BTW some health-oriented groups will give away cheap pedometers, to encourage people to lose weight and stuff. The "10,000 step" program is the best known. I say, pedometers are neat, and fun, and cheap, so get one and let the wife use it.

larry savage
(pyeyo) - F

Locale: pacific northwest
Thanks, potting soil and pedometers on 04/29/2007 10:51:35 MDT Print View

Thanks, I always feel like Bullwinkle Moose doing his mr.-know-it-all skit just as Rocky shows him the light when I ask one of these questions. "And now I'm going to pull a rabbit out of my hat", so I'm off to see what's what with pedometers around here. Well, maybe I'm really going to buy garden plants and perhaps slip away to look.
Ah the life of the domesticated mountaineer, a 5.10 potting soil mixed route. Aerate the lawn with old crampons.
Hope someone is hiking someplace ... .

Zack Freije
(oldskool) - F

Locale: Ohio
Pedometer on 05/04/2007 21:17:13 MDT Print View

I am looking for a nice basic, light pedometer. I find it to be useful when guaging time and distance. I find a lot of people tend to panic if they have no idea where they are or if they will make it off the trail before night, etc.

I ended up purchasing the smallest pedometer I could find at REI. It is almost too small to use. I am not sure what the weight is but it seems good enough to me and it was only $12.

Edited by oldskool on 05/06/2007 09:08:07 MDT.