Forum Index » GEAR » Warm downjacket for the "waiting time" (photographer)


Display Avatars Sort By:
Stephen Komae
(skomae) - MLife

Locale: northeastern US
Patagonia Fitz Roy on 09/13/2013 15:46:46 MDT Print View

I have the Patagonia Fitz Roy as my cold weather/alpine belay jacket. It is ridiculously warm. It is built with box-baffles like winter sleeping bags. The hood seals the deal, since there is nothing like having a nice toasty head.

Very expensive at MSRP, but can be sometimes found for a great deal.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
DriDown, et. al. on 09/13/2013 20:26:27 MDT Print View

I recommend buying a down jacket made with some form of down-specific DWR (Durable Water Repellant) substance.

Dri Down, Encapsul and a few other treatments make down VERY resistant to both exterior wet (rain, snow) and interior dampness (sweat).

Plus, once wet they dry very fast, faster than some synthetic fills.

Richard May
(richardmay)

Locale: Costa Rica
Re: Warm downjacket for the "waiting time" (photographer) on 09/14/2013 05:25:02 MDT Print View

Personally I like the infinity because of the Dri-down.

Here are the threads of Richard Nisley's work:

The best clothing combinations for backpacking or hiking?
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/xdpy/forum_thread/9378/index.html

A New Paradigm for Understanding Garment Warmth
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=18950

Christoph Blank
(chbla) - F

Locale: Austria
thanks on 09/25/2013 03:34:14 MDT Print View

Thanks for your comments and links!

However, I can't find anywhere how to actually calculate (at least an estimate) these values based on the expected MET values and loft weight/material.. or did I miss this?

Thanks a lot,
Christoph

Lapsley Hope
(Laps) - M
how about this? on 09/25/2013 06:12:31 MDT Print View

Eddie Bauer First Ascent BC MicroThermâ„¢ Down Jacket 2.0.
I don't own one, but seriously considering it due to water repellant properties.
I have a MontBell Alpine Lite which is great for backpacking, but still have to wear a waterproof shell with it if raining.

Christoph Blank
(chbla) - F

Locale: Austria
Yeti Torre II on 12/05/2013 08:56:37 MST Print View

I got a response from Yeti now.

The Yeti Torre II contains (size L):
1. The best Gold ( 860 cui ) down 325 gr.
2. 700 cui - 360 gr.

Richard Nisley, what are the limits for this Jacket (not moving much, as stated in the earlier posts, photographing)?
I'm not sure if it isn't too warm ..

Thanks a lot,
Christoph

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Yeti Torre II on 12/05/2013 16:50:02 MST Print View

An easy way to ballpark a static temp rating is to think of your jacket as ~40% of a full hooded sleeping bag. So with a ~345g down in a jacket, you can expect this to be similar to a sleeping bag with 345/0.4 = ~863g of down. EN-rated ~180cm long bags with ~863g down are typically rated to around -18C/0F.

Remember though this low temp rating is only valid in a wind blocking shelter. If you are sitting around in an exposed area with even a slight breeze, expect lower performance. And of course at -18C, you must have your legs covered by some serious down pants/blanket/bag too and be sitting on a R5-rated ground insulating mat as well. Frankly, I would want to have a small wood or canister gas stove/radiant heater nearby if I had to sit around for hours at this temp.

Edited by rmjapan on 12/05/2013 17:46:59 MST.

Richard Nisley
(richard295) - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Yeti Torre II on 12/05/2013 17:44:39 MST Print View

-10F for standing thermo neural temp during photography. As Rick stated the rating assumes shelter from the wind.

Christoph Blank
(chbla) - F

Locale: Austria
Thanks! on 12/06/2013 00:56:23 MST Print View

Thanks a lot for your comments!

I think, this one might get rather warm, considering that -20 is the peak basically.
In this case the Rab Neutrino Plus mentioned above might be a better option as it's in the middle.. and I could then add a middle layer down shirt or anything like that for the colder days..

However, the Neutrino Plus is quite heavy

Edited by chbla on 12/06/2013 00:59:08 MST.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
waiting on 12/06/2013 02:06:38 MST Print View

Many years of sitting motionless for hours in deer stands and duck blinds taught me that no clothing provides enough warmth if you are not moving. Sit still for 4 hours and you will be uncomfortably cold in almost any temperature unless you are way overdressed for it.

Insulated coveralls are nice below 45F

It also GREATLY depends on if you are in sun exposure or not. Night and day differenc.

Edited by livingontheroad on 12/06/2013 02:07:49 MST.

Christoph Blank
(chbla) - F

Locale: Austria
moving on 12/06/2013 02:10:08 MST Print View

Hi,

In my case I don't completely stand still all the time, as in deer stands etc, so it's not that crucial. I can move if I want, but if you just move in an area of some meters, waiting for a good shot, then it's getting cold quite fast.

I also think that I can improve shoes/trousers as well in addition.

Christoph Blank
(chbla) - F

Locale: Austria
yeti or rab on 12/06/2013 09:40:55 MST Print View

I'm torn between the Yeti Torre II and the Rab Neutrino Plus right now.

Although they claim it's a good city jacket for could winter days, I think the torre is a bit too warm. I tend towards the Neutrino Plus

Christoph Blank
(chbla) - F

Locale: Austria
neutrino plus on 12/20/2013 12:38:23 MST Print View

Got the Rab Neutrino Plus in M and L now - but it's quite hard to decide which one to take.

Overall the quality is great, this will be a very convenient jacket for my purpose

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: A very flat place (Grrrrrrrr)
Re: neutrino plus on 12/20/2013 12:52:07 MST Print View

Probaly best to go with the one that has plenty of room for extra layers.