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Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Sewing Machine User Info on 03/19/2013 08:52:38 MDT Print View

I, and perhaps others, have posted this before. Given recent thread tension discussions I thought it might be good to post it again. It has really helped me over the years.

sewing machine info

Edited by lyrad1 on 03/19/2013 08:54:23 MDT.

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Sewing 101 on 03/19/2013 09:03:53 MDT Print View

Thanks! That's very timely. I'm just starting and having been using standard thread for practicing on stuff sacks. I switched to the Gutterman Mara from DIY Gear Supply and have had some issues. I thought it might be the bobbin tension but haven't tried that yet.

Since we are talking about beginner stuff here, what's up with the extended spool where the spool extends beyond the ends used with this thread? It has a larger inside spool diameter as well. Is that something used by industrial machines?

thread spool

Edited by rlnunix on 03/19/2013 09:04:43 MDT.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Sewing Machine User Info on 03/19/2013 09:18:15 MDT Print View

Nice Daryl.. my gf did a kite workshop with the author of that page.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Sewing Machine User Info on 03/19/2013 09:24:16 MDT Print View

Nice, thanks

Except it really confuses about flat felled, mock flat felled, french seams

First, they have what they call a "mock french seam" which I would just call a flat felled seam - sew row of stitches, open fabric, fold over seam allowance twice to hide raw edges, sew another row of stitches.

Then they have what they call a "French (or Flat Fell) Seam" which I would also just call a flat felled seam - same as above except the seam allowance for one fabric is half so the seam has one fewer layers of fabric. If you have thicker fabric or you're overlapping seams, having one fewer layers of fabric makes it easier to sew through.

And they don't have a French Seam - sew two pieces together with a row of stitches, turn inside out and sew another row of stitches creating a fold hiding the raw edges. This seam is probably not useful for kite sewing but useful for clothes.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: Sewing Machine User Info on 03/19/2013 09:44:18 MDT Print View

Jerry,

I agree with your comments about the seam info. I'm sticking with the recently discussed BPL versions. Last thing I need is two seam protocols running through me head. Sometimes more info is too much.

The thread tensioning portion of the link has been the most helpful to me.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Sewing 101 on 03/19/2013 15:01:28 MDT Print View

> what's up with the extended spool
It's a very standard spool for larger quantities of thread. The tubes out the end make it easy for the spool to spin on the support pin, and the thread does not get dirty from sitting on the machine.

Mara: 'microfilament twisted thread made of 100% polyester'
You can have some problems with tension and with kinking with 100% polyester threads. But I haven't tried Mara myself. I prefer a core-spun poly-cotton.

Cheers

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Thread on 03/19/2013 15:27:26 MDT Print View

Thanks Roger. What thread (specific brand and size) do you use in your tents? My first real project is going to be a flat tarp. I think the sewing is going to be a heck of a lot easier than learning all the associated terminology, threads, needles, stitch types, etc.