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Consumables Question
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Edward Jursek
(nedjursek@gmail.com) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Consumables Question on 03/16/2013 11:56:49 MDT Print View

I typically carry hand sanitizer, bug repellant lotion, sun tan lotion, and Dr. Bonner's in individual plastic squeeze bottles that weight .35oz each empty. For the purposes of calculating base weight, do you exclude the weight of the the actual contents of the bottles as "consumables?"

Edited by nedjursek@gmail.com on 03/16/2013 11:57:43 MDT.

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Consumables Question on 03/16/2013 12:43:38 MDT Print View

Technically you could, but I don't. It's too small a weight to really worry about. I just list the weight of those types of items as it would be when full.

Food, water, and fuel yes, because those can translate into several pounds.

Clayton Mauritzen
(GlacierRambler) - F - M

Locale: NW Montana
Re: Re: Consumables Question on 03/16/2013 12:50:00 MDT Print View

Food, water, and fuel also vary a lot more depending on the trip. For small things like that, I only use a little at a time, so the weight difference is negligible. I also tend to just fill the containers and use them until near empty. Sure I could save an ounce or two with something smaller, but I prefer to minimize my hassle in packing for a trip.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Consumables Question on 03/16/2013 12:51:33 MDT Print View

"For the purposes of calculating base weight, do you exclude the weight of the the actual contents of the bottles as 'consumables?' "

Does it matter?

Adam Rothermich
(aroth87) - F

Locale: Missouri Ozarks
Re: Re: Consumables Question on 03/16/2013 13:28:09 MDT Print View

--Does it matter?--

+1

When you put that pack on its all the same whether its "consumable" or "base weight." Maybe instead of posting spreadsheets we should post pictures of our weigh-in at the trailhead. I'm as guilty as anyone about keeping a spreadsheet and playing with it to cut weight but I'm sure I'm not the only person whose spreadsheet and actual pack contents rarely match. You know, on those rare occasions I actually use my gear :D

Adam

Edward Jursek
(nedjursek@gmail.com) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Does it matter? on 03/16/2013 17:12:02 MDT Print View

Yes and no. On one hand it is a really simple question. Every item we carry weighs something. I am trying to get the most comprehensive spreadsheet together I can for a realistic base weight. In doing so, I don't want to leave out those last minute things we often throw into the pack right before we hit the trail, or those miscellaneous items we "forget" to add. I have seen BPLers post some crazy light gear lists only to have members point out all of the essential items they left out. I am really trying to focus on that "hidden weight", especially the miscellaneous personal items that can really add up. Then I was looking at some miscellaneous consumables, and wondering how to best account for them. The devil is in the details.

In my original question, the Dr. Bonner's, hand sanitizer, sun tan lotion, and bug lotion all added up to 4oz, not including the containers. So my original question was where to record that four ounces? Under base weight? As a consumable? This has lead me to create a separate consumables spreadsheet, in an effort to better understand and save weight on that side of the ledger. Consumables seem to get a lot less attention than the items that make up our base weight. I suspect there are lots of hidden ounces there.

On any multi-day trip, I also check the actual weight of my pack, including all consumables, plus one liter of water, before I load it into the car. Of course, it always heavier than I estimated off of my spreadsheet. The hope is I can get closer to an accurate idea of my total pack weight as possible.

Edited by nedjursek@gmail.com on 03/16/2013 17:16:08 MDT.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Does it matter? on 03/16/2013 19:44:40 MDT Print View

I usually include everything in my pack, except food and water, as base weight. If I bring DEET or suntan lotion (I don't bring sunscreen - I work on my tan when hiking) I might not use the stuff.

I don't publish most of my hikes, so my main concern is the total pack weight. Most of the time the stuff I carry in my pockets is added to the base weight too.

To me the most important function of a gearlist is just that - a checklist so I don't forget something. I only bring what I need for any given trip; so what it weighs is what it weighs. I hike too often to constantly worry that there is a lighter item for me to purchase.

Greg F
(GregF) - F

Locale: Canadian Rockies
Base Weight on 03/16/2013 19:45:43 MDT Print View

Most people put the bug repellant and soap in their base weights. Base weight is generally posted as non worn, not food, water, or fuel but include the containers to carry them.

I think food packed doesnt get enough discussion as it is usually around 50% of your total pack weight. And it is one of the easiest areas to become more efficient.

Michael Gillenwater
(mwgillenwater) - M

Locale: Seattle area
Re: Base Weight on 03/17/2013 09:42:57 MDT Print View

I find a lot of gear lists seem to leave off car keys (which can be heavy for all those with the wireless key fob integrated) and cell phone (for GPS or just for safety in places where you can get a signal on peaks, etc.). This can up to half a pound. For longer trips where I really want the GPS backup, I add an extra battery pack (3 to 6oz) to recharge my phone along with the cable (you can find super short versions to save a few grams).

Edward Jursek
(nedjursek@gmail.com) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
hidden weight on 03/17/2013 13:11:15 MDT Print View

I also see bear spray left off a lot of lists. My can is 13.5oz. I take the door fob with me but leave the keys. I just weighted the door fob. It weights .5 oz. Added it to my spreadsheet, thanks! Obviously, I am suffering from cabin fever.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: hidden weight on 03/17/2013 14:24:56 MDT Print View

What happens if the door fob battery dies while on a trip? Can you get back into your car?

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Re: hidden weight on 03/17/2013 14:38:25 MDT Print View

If your car doesn't have a manual key lock at least on the driver's side, then may I suggest getting a new car? :)

It happened to me once. My fob died on an overnight in winter. Freaked out for a 1/2 second until I realized I could unlock the door like in the olden days by actual key and lock. Mine is a fob/key combo.

Edited by T.L. on 03/17/2013 14:43:01 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: hidden weight on 03/17/2013 14:51:46 MDT Print View

"What happens if the door fob battery dies while on a trip? Can you get back into your car?"

Generally, if the wireless fob dies, the key still works in the lock. The small problem is that it may activate the car's horn from the security system. However, that runs for one minute or something and then times out.

[From the school of Been There, Done That]

--B.G.--

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: hidden weight on 03/17/2013 14:56:12 MDT Print View

My door fob (which is 13 years old) has a weak spring inside so once a year it no longer contacts the battery and quits working.

So, I have to quickly get into car while the horn is honking, put key in ignition and turn it on which turns off the alarm.

Michael Gillenwater
(mwgillenwater) - M

Locale: Seattle area
Re: Re: hidden weight on 03/17/2013 22:28:02 MDT Print View

Many new cars (mine included) come with door key and key fob integrate into one unit that cannot be separated (well it could but you have to start ripping things apart). Mine weights 1.7oz

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
consumeable on 03/18/2013 04:20:48 MDT Print View

If you actually use it, its consumeable.
If you dont, and you bring it all back, might as well count it in base wt.