World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition
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Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/29/2013 15:05:39 MDT Print View

I wonder at what point it's too low? It's constantly loosing heat, so the longer you take to boil, the more heat you're losing.
Yeah, if you turn it down ultra low, you'll loose more heat to the environment than you're adding to the system, and your pot will never boil. If you've picked a sheltered site and you're using some kind of windscreen, you should be able to go fairly low. I think for most people the real issue will be more one of patience. Will people really put up with a 15 minute boil time when they could have a 5 minute boil time? Still, it's worth experimenting with and finding a happy medium that works for you. Of course in colder or windier conditions, you may have to turn things up a bit in order to keep boil times more reasonable.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/29/2013 15:27:19 MDT Print View

Jan S
(karl-ton)
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/29/2013 15:39:18 MDT Print View

"I could create exactly the same video effects myself with two identical stoves."

Let me guess: Using different gas mixtures? Provided you don't just turn one stove down by hand.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/30/2013 12:10:50 MDT Print View

It's all about pressure. Set up a situation where the pressure is quite high in the beginning but much lower (but still sufficient) toward the end, and the MicroRegulator will come out looking like a champ.

The only problem of course is that those aren't real conditions. Out in cold weather, your pressure starts low and only gets lower. When there is insufficient pressure, I don't care what kind of valve you put on a stove, you're not going to get good performance. Period.

For those who may doubt that such is true, I invite you to look at my post, Advantages (?) of Regulator Valved Stoves, Part II. Take a look at the second video on that post where I compare a needle valved stove to the MicroRegulator. It's taken at the end of a burn. Both canisters are cold, neither one has pressure, and neither stove has good performance.

Again, the MicroRegulator is a fine stove (see my review). If I were going to use a windscreen suspended from a pot, the Soto MicroRegulator would be my first choice for the stove to use with that kind of set up. But as for a cold weather advantage in actual field conditions? No.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/30/2013 12:25:54 MDT Print View

When I first turn on a conventional canister stove, I'll turn it up to a reasonable level.

Then, after a minute or so, due to evaporative cooling inside the canister, the pressure will drop, and the stove will go down to a low level.

It's gradual, so usually I don't notice it until it's way low, then I'll turn it up back to a reasonable level.

This is especially true when it's cold and/or there is less fuel in the canister.

With the regulator, I don't think this would happen.

So, there is some utility to the regulator. It's kind of annoying when I notice the flame level has gone down and it's taking forever to heat up.

But, it's not annoying enough for me to worry about it much. And the Soto people don't talk about this.

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Efficiency?!? on 03/30/2013 12:55:17 MDT Print View

The Soto demonstration did nothing to demonstrate efficiency. As the canister cools you do not need to adjust the Soto, but you do need to adjust the non-regulated stove. That is the advantage of the regulator, and it is the ONLY advantage. In that video they could have simply turned the other stove up to match the Soto.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Re: Efficiency?!? on 03/30/2013 13:41:08 MDT Print View

The Soto demonstration did nothing to demonstrate efficiency.
Yep. There's nothing about a particular valve that would necessarily lend itself to greater efficiency.

What you set is what you get.

Set the valve to a high flame, you'll get poor effciency.
Set the valve to a low flame, you'll get good* efficiency.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

*or at least as good as you're going to get for a given set up. You still need a good overall set up, particularly a windscreen, if you want decent efficiency. A low flame is just one part of the overall equation of efficiency.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/30/2013 15:38:11 MDT Print View

Jim wrote
> Again, the MicroRegulator is a fine stove
Oh yes, the stove itself is well made and works well, and I said that in the article. It's all the marketing spin which stinks.

Cheers

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: Tokyo, Japan
Re: Efficiency?!? on 03/31/2013 20:35:00 MDT Print View

"The Soto demonstration did nothing to demonstrate efficiency. As the canister cools you do not need to adjust the Soto, but you do need to adjust the non-regulated stove. That is the advantage of the regulator, and it is the ONLY advantage. In that video they could have simply turned the other stove up to match the Soto."

In the "tips" section of the SOTO manual it explains the SOTO stove requires 1.5 turns vs. 0.5 turns for the common needle valve stove to start letting gas out for ignition. To reach full power the SOTO requires several more turns while the needle valve is already pretty much wide open with another 0.5 turn. Indeed, we actually see this valve turning "difference" in the video.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Regulator Valves, Needle Valves on 04/06/2013 12:34:00 MDT Print View

In the "tips" section of the SOTO manual it explains the SOTO stove requires 1.5 turns vs. 0.5 turns for the common needle valve stove to start letting gas out for ignition. To reach full power the SOTO requires several more turns while the needle valve is already pretty much wide open with another 0.5 turn. Indeed, we actually see this valve turning "difference" in the video.
Of course there are needle valves and then there are needle valves. There's no law that says "Thou shalt have a short taper." A needle valve can be designed to have a "long" taper or a short one. That's entirely up to the designer.

Actually the same is true in the case of regulator valves: They can open up right away or they can take a number of turns. I've used the following: The MSR Reactor, the Jetboil Sol, and the Soto MicroRegulator. The Soto MicroRegulator has by far the best fine control over the flame. Ever try to simmer with an MSR Reactor?

HJ
Adventures In Stoving