World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition
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Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/12/2013 16:26:24 MDT Print View

If you've watched my postings lately, you'll know that I've attempted to "bust" a couple of myths surrounding the Soto MicroRegulator stove (OD-1R): 1) the myth that somehow the MicroRegulator will be able to extract more fuel from a canister of gas than other stoves and 2) the myth that somehow the MicroRegulator will be able to function better in cold weather than other upright canister stoves.

But what of the stove itself? Is it any good?


And it's the world's lightest with auto-ignition? How did they manage that?


And most importantly of all, will it cook my breakfast?!


Please join me as I take a look at The Soto Microregulator (OD-1R)



HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: London, UK
Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/12/2013 17:14:09 MDT Print View

Jim, I see from your review comments that you also have the Soto windscreen. Any tests planned for that? I am always vexed by DIY windscreen challenge for my Gigapower and Gnat. Nothing I make ends up simple, effective, lightweight, and durable, pick two.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/12/2013 18:18:02 MDT Print View

Hi, Rick,

The little Soto "windscreen" is a lot nicer in that it's light and compact compared to its Snow Peak counterpart, and it can certainly do no harm. It will reflect heat upward, and it will offer a modicum of wind protection. A modicum. But will it really give you good wind protection? Not in my estimation. I think you need something more than that.

What I generally use with upright canister stoves is something like this:

which is made up of tripled or quadrupled household Al foil. It works although I have to brace it with rocks in more significant winds. The "trick" of course is that you have to frequently check with your hand the temperature of the canister. If the canister feels hot to the touch, you have to do something to prevent the canister from heating further.

When not in use, I keep it wrapped around my water bottle and then placed in a plastic bag. It's proved to be a lot more durable than I thought. It does need replacement fairly frequently, but it's held up for a week without a problem. A better solution is tooling foil from a craft store which is more durable than household foil.

I've got an article on my blog which has a lot of ideas about windscreens if you're interested.

Really windy days? I take a remote canister stove and use a full 360 degree windscreen.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
Lightest on 03/12/2013 18:55:57 MDT Print View

Jim,
If you are going to do a world's lightest post, it would be good to start out with the weight.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/12/2013 19:26:22 MDT Print View

Samuel,
The weight is in the review.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Lightest on 03/12/2013 19:38:51 MDT Print View

If you are going to do a world's lightest post, it would be good to start out with the weight.

No problem (but it is in the review). :) Soto says 73g. My scale at home says 70g. In other words, 2.5 oz. The weight penalty for having auto ignition is zero when compared to a lot of upright canister stoves, but when compared to something like a Monatauk Gnat (FMS-116t), then it's roughly 3/4 ounce.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Paul Mason
(dextersp1) - F
Colorado on 03/12/2013 19:49:14 MDT Print View

Jim,
I'm in Colorado now hiking some 14ers.

I'm using the Soto, soto wind screen and Jet Boil fuel.

I'm not timing boil times but it is working fine. So far I've been stopping about 12,000 feet for either hot chocolate or freeze dried eggs. I tried freeze dried chili macaroni but sitting around for 13-15 minutes is too long.

The ignitor worked at 12,000 feet once but I'm using a Bic lighter now because I don't want to risk breaking the ignitor.

Look like you will need to test the new one.

http://www.campsaver.com/od-1rx-micro-regulator-stove

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Colorado on 03/12/2013 20:01:14 MDT Print View

If you're getting your piezo to work at 12,000 feet, that's pretty good.

Look like you will need to test the new one.
http://www.campsaver.com/od-1rx-micro-regulator-stove

That link looks like something of a placeholder. The photo is the OD-1R not the OD-1RX.

The OD-1RX has two sets of detachable pot supports, one for larger pots, one for smaller. I'm not sure how I feel about that although I'm all in favor of greater pot stability. I'll have to see it. They've also changed the burner head so that it is concave instead of convex. It's supposed to help with wind resistance. They're calling it the Wind Master.



Looks interesting.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: Colorado on 03/13/2013 09:50:46 MDT Print View

Judging by this diagram, it appears that the thinking is that the shape of the burner will cause a lot of the wind to flow under the burner head.

Interesting. But I do notice that the sides are of course still open. They've also decreased the pot height above the burner head which could lead to more CO production if they didn't do something to compensate.

I'd like to do some field testing with it.

HJ
Adventures in Stoving

Paul Mason
(dextersp1) - F
Re: Re: Colorado on 03/13/2013 10:09:41 MDT Print View

Jim,
Thanks for posting that. I searched and went to the Soto homepage but didn't see any info on the new stove.

I like the head design. The pot supports still look flimsy to me. I guess they fold somehow. I wouldn't like it if, they need to be folded and stored off the stove - one more thing to lose. And, in the cold I wear fleece gloves; I don't want to be handling small things.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: New Soto OD-1RX on 03/13/2013 11:11:49 MDT Print View

Paul,

I haven't seen an OD-1RX in person yet, but just judging from a video I saw (which I'll post a link if I can find it again), it looks like the larger pot supports can be left in place and folded up over the burner head. The smaller pot supports can't fold up (while on the stove) from what I can see. In travel mode, I might just leave the larger pot supports in place and fold them rather than take them on and off although the larger supports look pretty easy on and off. The smaller pot supports look like they have to be fiddled with a bit to get them secured to the stove -- not a good thing with cold hands. The smaller pot supports look like they'd be targeted toward minimalists who want to cook with small mug type pots.

The current pot supports aren't so bad. No worse in terms of "floppiness" than on something like a FMS-116t. It seems like a bit of a gamble for Soto to try something like two interchangeable pot supports. I must admit that I'm now danged curious about the stove.

Looks like the weight is up slightly (I see 2.6oz quoted instead of 2.5oz) and the price is quoted as $75.00.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: World's Lightest Canister Stove with Auto Ignition on 03/13/2013 16:43:21 MDT Print View

Here's the video link. Pot supports that you take off to pack the stove. Interesting.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Paul Mason
(dextersp1) - F
Thanks for the video on 03/13/2013 18:06:01 MDT Print View

Jim,
Thanks for the video. I'm happy with the current model and wind screen set up. But, I would be interested in your review.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Thanks for the video on 03/13/2013 18:58:28 MDT Print View

I'd like to review one. I'm always interested when I see a stove company trying something a little different. I'm sure the detachable/interchangeable supports will work in the technical sense. I'm not sure if they'll work in the market place. The wind resistance remains to be seen as well.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Colorado on 03/13/2013 19:07:37 MDT Print View

"The ignitor worked at 12,000 feet once but I'm using a Bic lighter now because I don't want to risk breaking the ignitor"

Are you saying piezo-electric lighters don't work at 12,000 feet?

I wonder why it doesn't work there and what fails.

That would include piezo-electric lighters - I have heard they don't work above 10,000 feet.

I hate the old BIC flint and steel lighters because they don't work if it gets wet.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Piezo-electric lighters don't work at 12,000 feet? on 03/13/2013 20:52:05 MDT Print View

I've had piezoelectric lighters fail as low as 7500'/2280m in cold windy weather. I forget the technical explanation but it's something about the density of the air being too low to transmit enough energy to bring the gas to ignition.

Speaking from just what I've encountered, hand held piezoelectric butane lighters tend to fail at lower altitude's than the piezo on a stove -- assuming both are in working order. Piezos fail of course for reasons other than altitude. I assume this is due to the volume of the gas put out by a stove vs. a lighter.

I don't think it hurts a piezo to try it at higher elevations; it just doesn't work, that's all.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

Edited by hikin_jim on 03/13/2013 21:51:30 MDT.

Paul McLaughlin
(paul) - MLife
Re: Piezo-electric lighters don't work at 12,000 feet? on 03/13/2013 21:33:00 MDT Print View

Hikin' Jim sez:
"Speaking from just what I've encountered, hand held butane lighters tend to fail at lower altitude's than the piezo on a stove -- assuming both are in working order".

Now that's interesting. I've never had a butane lighter fail, other than due to cold. And the cold is not really failure, and easily defeated - put the thing in your pocket for a few minutes. But altitude up to 14.5K,no problem. What sort of failure did you experience with a lighter?

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Piezo-electric lighters don't work at 12,000 feet? on 03/13/2013 21:40:52 MDT Print View

Do you mean a Piezo-Electric Butane lighter works at 14.5K? Or an old style lighter with a steel wheel and piece of flint?

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: Piezo-electric lighters don't work at 12,000 feet? on 03/13/2013 21:47:23 MDT Print View

Sorry, I should be more specific:
"Speaking from just what I've encountered, hand held piezoelectric butane lighters tend to fail at lower altitude's than the piezo on a stove -- assuming both are in working order".

Bics work fine.

HJ
Adventures In Stoving

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Re: Piezo-electric lighters don't work at 12,000 feet? on 03/13/2013 21:52:50 MDT Print View

I think Bic makes a piezoelectric butane lighter : )