Hydration bladders... out of fashion?
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Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Re: Acessing water bottles on 03/19/2013 16:05:11 MDT Print View

Ben, you have to backpack more than two days consecutively to appreciate a pack.


; )

Edited by FamilyGuy on 07/08/2013 23:21:20 MDT.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
bladders on 03/19/2013 16:16:37 MDT Print View

Im not in so much of a hurry I cant stop to take a drink.
Actually I can reach my bottles, and put them back just fine, even while walking.
If you cant, and I know many people that cannot, you only need to work on flexibility a little.

The drawbacks of heavier weight, hard to remove and fill, hard to clean, hard to know how much you have, etc just dont make it worthwhile to fool with bladders

Edited by livingontheroad on 03/19/2013 16:17:14 MDT.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Re: Re: Re: Acessing water bottles on 03/19/2013 16:26:06 MDT Print View

"Ben, you have to backpack more than two days consecutively to appreciate a Mchale."

My week-long, three-season trips are about 25 lbs total pack weight -- and fit nicely as a carry on when flying (I check poles and blade in a long cardboard tube). The backpack is my beloved Mountainsmith Ghost -- and the few times I don't use hydration tube, I too can reach to take out and put back my water bottles.


Edited. Missed the silly smirk in David's post. :)

Edited by ben2world on 03/19/2013 16:30:03 MDT.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Acessing water bottles on 03/19/2013 17:02:56 MDT Print View

I have a MYOG pack with no pockets. I just pull out water bottle (1 pint re-used soda bottle) and put it back in. I don't see what the problem is.

I returned my Steripen because on several sets of batteries I only got a couple liters of treatment. On the best set of batteries it treated half what they said. I got rechargeable Tenergy and non-rechargeable Energizer. Maybe rechargeable Tenergy aren't good enough, just happened to get a bad set of Energizer although they had a good use by date, or my particular Steripen was an energy hog.

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Re: Bladders on 03/19/2013 17:50:17 MDT Print View

"Actually I can reach my bottles, and put them back just fine, even while walking.
If you cant, and I know many people that cannot, you only need to work on flexibility a little."

Me too. With my current pack. But not previous packs so I'd say it varies by person and pack.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Re: Bladders on 03/19/2013 17:58:14 MDT Print View

Why do you need to constantly access water while you're walking?

I just stop every hour or two, take off pack, stretch, drink, maybe eat a bite

Randy Nelson
(rlnunix) - F - M

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Bladders on 03/19/2013 18:24:56 MDT Print View

"Why do you need to constantly access water while you're walking?

I just stop every hour or two, take off pack, stretch, drink, maybe eat a bite"

Like I said in my previous post, I prefer to not carry water and stop at water sources to drink when that is practical. But when I'm not doing that, I don't stop much. Mostly quick stops for pictures. Just like to keep moving I guess. Then I'll drink more often and smaller amounts. This is when solo. With others I adapt to whatever they like to do. I'm easy.

And like Family Guy, I do use a bladder on day hikes and sip as I go. I think of day hikes as training hikes for backpacking and carry some extra weight. Usually in the form of 12 oz cans. :)

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
"Hydration bladders... out of fashion?" on 03/19/2013 19:15:57 MDT Print View

Jerry: For my whole hiking life I've just relied on tanking up on water in camp. I've also noticed that my pee was yellow during the day, even though I'd stop every once in a while to drink. A recent health related incident convinced me that I'm not taking dehydration seriously enough. I don't like having to take off my pack every hour to drink water. And so, I've decided to carry a Steripen and a soft Nalgene in a very small belly pack for easy access. In the Sierras, there's generally a lot of water; certainly where you are there's more. I want to be drinking a liter every hour, at least, on the trail. But I don't want to carry a drop! or much more than a half liter. In my experience, this is doable where I mostly hike.

Anthony Weston
(anthonyweston) - MLife

Locale: Southern CA
hydration on 03/19/2013 19:30:33 MDT Print View

I still use a hydration sleeve and a 3 liter bladder. Never had problems with it.
Some of the area's I hike just don't have water along the way. I use a sawyer inline filter or a sawyer squeeze to refill.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: "Hydration bladders... out of fashion?" on 03/19/2013 20:25:28 MDT Print View

Jeffrey - each of us is different and in your case, okay, maybe you need water at hand

But a lot of people take more water and drink more often than they really need

Hopefully you won't watch story on TV about me dieing of dehyration on the side of the trail

David Lutz
(davidlutz)

Locale: Bay Area
"Hydration bladders... out of fashion?" on 03/19/2013 20:41:53 MDT Print View

When I take a streipen I use a wide-mouth soft-sided collapsible Nalgene with an MSR cap and hose, upside down in a side pocket.

sheila o
(bumpass) - F

Locale: The Far Left Coast? : /
steri pen/bladder user on 03/21/2013 01:12:41 MDT Print View

I use a bladder and keep a filled 16oz bottle on the side. I steri pen filter the water with a cut off a 2 liter plastic soda bottle that I mark off @ 1/2 and 1 liter. The cut off bottle doubles for so many things and my stove fits inside neatly. Hope that helps.

Edited by bumpass on 03/21/2013 01:13:44 MDT.