Forum Index » Philosophy & Technique » The "I don't get it" thread


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Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Heet vs canisters on 03/11/2013 07:29:00 MDT Print View

> 12oz bottle of HEET is $5 on Amazon.. 12 boils 4oz canister of isobutane is $4.5-5.50 and is 15+ boils. never leaks, never spills, boils 1.5c of water in 3 minutes.

That's some seriously expensive Heet. Even in Aspen, CO, I picked up a bottle for $2.50 at a Shell station downtown. You should be able to get at LEAST 18 boils out of a bottle. I get 20-22 (using a Super Cat) though some of my boils are just 1 cup.

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Windshirts on 03/11/2013 07:36:11 MDT Print View

I think the main reason I haven't felt compelled to spend the money on one is that my normal hiking shirt (BPL Thorofare) pretty much acts like one. It's tightly woven so insects can't bite through. It does not however have DWR so I'd need to add the rain layer if conditions dictate.

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Cameras on 03/11/2013 07:53:36 MDT Print View

My neurons don't seem to recall as well as David's or Ben's. I like to relive the trip and share with others. I'm fairly selective on what I'll take pics of but will admit I'll sometimes take a lot of a particular scene and at time think I go overboard. I've moved toward taking more video than pics so I can document the trip better. I prefer video trip reports than photos and text.

Erik Basil
(EBasil) - M

Locale: Atzlan
I don't get... on 03/11/2013 09:12:26 MDT Print View

I used to "not get" this "Base Weight" and "Skin Out Weight" fanaticism, but now I do. In terms of Base Weight, it's still confusing to anyone that is concerned with the more basic "what's my pack going to actually weigh when I hike" issue, but it's useful to isolate weight and gear issues. Of course, it's also useful to brag with misleading-ly low numbers, ha ha! The part of "skin-out" that I get is that it's dumb. (Yes, I get it clearly and anyone that likes "skin-out" numbers doesn't get it. Everyone but me is crazy, etc...) Finally, although I "get" Base Weight, I still focus and prefer Pack Weight/Trailhead Weight/Carry Weight.

I still don't "get" floorless shelters, Reflectix sleeping pads, 5-toe shoes to backpack in and the ascetic "take the bare minimum to survive" approach. I have been lured and swayed by Tony Ronco's "Comfort UL" (or "comfort light") even though I carry WAAAAAY more than he and his crew do. Come to think of it, I think he uses floorless shelters. That man needs help.

William Segraves
(sbill9000) - F - M
base weight on 03/11/2013 11:16:17 MDT Print View

"2 night trip will use the same base gear as a 2 week trip"

For what it's worth, my base weight's usually significantly different for a 2 night trip vs a 10 night trip. Even if everything else were the same (which it's usually not, see below), 12 extra pounds of food would normally push me up to a different pack.

My base weight will also vary based on expected weather, terrain, proximity to potential exit points, recreational opportunities, and whether solo or group.

Best,

Bill S.

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: base weight on 03/11/2013 14:12:51 MDT Print View

"For what it's worth, my base weight's usually significantly different for a 2 night trip vs a 10 night trip. Even if everything else were the same (which it's usually not, see below), 12 extra pounds of food would normally push me up to a different pack."

Agreed. I usually only do overnight trips when the weather forecast is good. A 10 day trip means I pack for every kind of weather imaginable, including extra food and water if I should get caught by a swollen river or whiteout. This means my tent, sleeping bag, clothing, stove and fuel choice are different, as well as the extra food. For an overnight, I would not even bother to carry stuff like toothpaste, toothbrush, washing supplies etc..., and may just throw in a Frogg Togg just in case. Longer trips I will take a more durable rainjacket. So to me, base weight, skin-out, total weight and all that nonsense varies by trip, and also by whether it's just me or me and my partner.

Justin Baker
(justin_baker) - F

Locale: west coast best coast
I don't get...... on 03/11/2013 16:17:21 MDT Print View

I don't get why people freak out about cotton clothing.
I wear a simple cotton t-shirt 90% of the time, but it's usually mild weather when I hike. I get a slight cool down from sweat when I stop, but it's not that big of a problem. They are comfortable and cheap and don't smell horrible after an hour of hiking. Polycotton is really good too. If the weather gets nasty, I always have a wind shirt and a non-cotton base layer to throw on.
What I REALLY don't get is people wearing synthetic shirts in the middle summer when it's scorching hot out. Why would you want a wicking layer in a hot environment? Maybe I just don't sweat enough to get uncomfortably sweaty.
Denim pants aren't that bad either if the weather is dry. They protect your legs much better than thin nylon pants if you are bushwacking or walking through prickly thorn stuff.
I'm just tired of people treating cotton clothing as if it's always unacceptable for hiking in any situation.

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: I don't get...... on 03/11/2013 16:51:22 MDT Print View

Justin, I agree with you 100%. Cotton is overly demonised in backpacking circles. And I like silk too :)

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: I don't get...... on 03/11/2013 17:48:05 MDT Print View

Justin, I agree with you 100%. Cotton is overly demonised in backpacking circles. And I like silk too :)

Definitely agree with both of you. I wonder, sometimes, how many people in the backpacking circles have hiked in super high humidity or jungles. You want just the opposite in those situations, where trying to stay cool means something that doesn't dry out too fast, and the danger of hypothermia is nonexistent. And why would anyone want to wear a synthetic layer in hot, humid conditions when you want something that breathes as much as possible? Both nylon and polyester breathe terribly compared to cotton (or silk). It's different from hot, dry conditions, where you can get cool in the shade.

A cotton bandana makes a great towel and neckerchief.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
The "I don't get it" thread on 03/11/2013 17:57:10 MDT Print View

"cotton kills" is the easy way out, saves having to explain when and why.
(BTW, cotton does not kill, it is people that wear wet cotton at just above and below freezing that kill themselves)
oddly well below freezing cotton is good again.
Anyway, I wear a wool T (or cotton) when it is really hot, so there.
@Miguel
Yes a wet cotton bandana (OK I use a hankie...) around the neck helps a lot too when hot.
I always have a large cotton hankie with me.
(and the Buff...)

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
"The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 19:02:46 MDT Print View

Cotton doesn't kill people. Cottonmouths kill people, or make them very sick.

Still, I never wear cotton while backpacking. I don't want to get bit.

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 19:35:29 MDT Print View

Seems "a lot" of people don't get it.

For gear brought, think about what you actually need (on your back).

A warm enough jack to lounge around in.
A sleeping bag that with the jacket is warm enough.
Food, maybe a can stove and gas to cook.
A pad
About 4 ounces between sun block, and toiletries.
Pack and maps.

So look at everyones pack lists, there are 3-4 times as much crap in them.
I don't get it...

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 19:46:54 MDT Print View

Oh really, Aaron, why do you need to cook food?

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 19:48:00 MDT Print View

He did say maybe.


Aaron doesn't look like he eats very much. Probably dispenses with the stove.

Edited by kthompson on 03/11/2013 19:54:42 MDT.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 19:50:21 MDT Print View

hmm.. i find cotton to be pretty damn abrasive when it's sweaty/wet. when i was younger and wore cotton tshirt i'd always have chaffed up shoulders and hips from my straps. now it's wool or synthetic. i wear carharts for rock climbing but they are pretty rough for lots of hiking and hot too. nylon zip offs for me.. no bushwacking here.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 19:53:03 MDT Print View

"Cotton doesn't kill people. Cottonmouths kill people, or make them very sick."


I hate it when I get cottonmouth. Makes me stop for water more often....

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 20:04:53 MDT Print View

what about something to keep the rain off (while moving and while resting - seems nescessary.

Something to ancor this shelter to the ground with is nice when it windy.

A pot to cook the food in (& eat it out off) is handy. And a lid and windshield is nice so you can carry less fuel. Some device to start the stove helps.

Container to protect your food from critters is helpful in many hiking areas.

But yes many thing aren't really essential to getting by while out...just essential in determining how well we get by. Each enviroment coupled with each individual will demand different things for getting by and getting by well.

Aaron Sorensen
(awsorensen) - MLife

Locale: South of Forester Pass
Re: Re: Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 21:46:40 MDT Print View

I would rather get by with half the weight then fell like I need what I really don't.

Then again, some people don't get why you have to go so light when some of the stuff they carry "only" weighs a few pounds.

Katharina ....
(Kat_P) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Coast
I don't get it thread on 03/11/2013 21:55:28 MDT Print View

I don't get the whole " let's see how low, cold, uncomfortable I can go and still make it through the night". I have seen it over and over, as if it is an achievement worthy the risk or even just the discomfort.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: "The "I don't get it" thread" on 03/11/2013 21:55:53 MDT Print View

Two things I don't get....

1. This need to compare with others. Don't get me wrong, I value other hikers' opinion and experience. But at the end, it's whatever works for me. Which brings us to #2...

2. The need to explain or justify to others.