Mountain Hardwear SuperMegaUL 2 SpotLite Review
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Thomas Glennon
(Eagletrek007) - MLife
Re: Re: Looks cramped on 03/09/2013 09:30:40 MST Print View

Lastly, I'm really amazed about how many folks have opinions about an item they haven't really tried or at least seen in person. Before you go condemming something, check in out at your local outfitter.

I make a living as an operational tester. I wouldn't go around praising or condemming an item until I fully tested it. For those of you worried about condensation, I'll see if I can't find the right climatic conditions to put it through it's paces but it may be hard right now in Central Texas.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Re: Re: Re: Looks cramped on 03/09/2013 09:33:33 MST Print View

Thanks for posting this, Thomas.

Kathleen Church
(carpediemkath) - M

Locale: desert Southwest
pole sockets on 03/12/2013 01:39:05 MDT Print View

I love those pole sockets! I use a Big Agnes Fly Creek 2 which is designed to clip the rain fly into a buckle right next to the end of each pole. I discovered that that setup channels water under the tent (especially with Big Agnes' footprint), so I took to using separate stakes to stake out the rain fly about two inches beyond each corner pole (plus I use a smaller piece of Tyvek instead of BA's footprint). MH's pole socket solves that problem by allowing some space between the fly and the tent pole, which gives enough clearance to channel water away from the bottom of the tent. All without having to carry extra stakes! Love the new design. It would be great if Big Agnes took note of this design and offered their own pole sockets as a retrofit for their tents.

James Schifferns
(schifferj) - M
Re: Re: condensation on 04/07/2013 21:58:39 MDT Print View

I couldn't agree more! I've lost track of the number of tents I've owned but all of them have had condensation at some point or other. The tent that would appear least susceptible to condensation, a Gossamer Gear/Tarptent Squall 2 which is basically a tarp attached to a floor with netting presents with condensation before I even get in it. I own several Hilleberg tents and they all have vents and they all have condensation. One of the least problematic is an Easton Kilo which is very similar to THIS tent. As I live in the PNW, I always carry a small camp towel or tent sponge to help deal with condensate.

Paul Lewer
(Idahoan) - M

Locale: Boise, Idaho
Why no two-hoop near equivalent? on 03/05/2014 02:34:57 MST Print View

A couple of questions related to the discussion here:

1) I have never understood the advantage of a freestanding design. I like to add the required stakes into the weight of the non-free standing tent and do a comparison from there. Other than that consideration I see no inherent advantage of freestanding tents. But I am seriously open to someone enlightening me. Edit: just read the nice discussion here on FS vs NFS: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=65896&disable_pagination=1

2) I am not sure why any manufacturers haven't yet come out with a two-hoop tent using light fabrics similar to the reviewed tent. I believe the overall weight would be less (even with stakes included). The smaller hoop near the feet is much shorter than the "spine" pole that runs the entire length of the tent. And this design doesn't suffer from the volume problems associated with the A-frame/spine pole designs (though they usually aren't designed from the ground up to be super roomy).

Edited by Idahoan on 03/05/2014 03:04:10 MST.