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Rubber band.....rubber band man.
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David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: Rubber band.....rubber band man. on 02/25/2013 00:19:09 MST Print View

>"I never pass up the chance to save a rubber band for reuse later! I wonder if that is a genetic trait or an acquired illness;-)"

Perhaps both, Jim.

I remember my uncle coming up on the Greyhound bus from Fresno to the SF area (he would actually take the local, not express version because he liked seeing the smaller town and seeing people going about their regular lives). Anyway, my father went to pick him up and couldn't find him for quite a while. Uncle Dick had seen a hundred rubber bands in the gutter where someone had dropped a package of them and he just couldn't leave them there.

There's a strong, male-linked hoarding gene in my family and I fight it. My uncle (who grew up in the Depression) and brother (who lived on the edge for many years) lost the battle. The cousins would go to their dad's house every 6 months and fill up one or two dumpsters of, well, garbage to anyone else's eyes but treasures to the hoarder.

So if you've got more rubber bands than you can possibly use before they become brittle. . . .

Kevin Beeden
(captain_paranoia) - F

Locale: UK
purple asparagus bands and latex bands on 02/27/2013 11:51:10 MST Print View

The asparagus bands may be purple so that they are clearly visible during food preparation, in the same way that caterers use blue sticking plasters for small cuts, etc. Purple and blue are generally 'no-no' natural food colour indicators, although we have become accustomed to some (blueberries, etc), and to artificial colours.

In the UK, the Royal Mail use elastic bands for their postmen to secure bundles of post, and the postman usually drops them on the ground when he's done* So the pavements tend to be littered with red elastic bands. These do deteriorate, both in sunlight and indoors. Trouble is, I don't know what they're made from... Latex, I suspect, as it's cheap and biodegradeable.

* The Royal Mail say they're not supposed to do this; they're meant to go back to the depot. Yeah, right...

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: purple asparagus bands and latex bands on 02/27/2013 14:27:27 MST Print View

"In the UK, the Royal Mail use elastic bands for their postmen to secure bundles of post, and the postman usually drops them on the ground when he's done* So the pavements tend to be littered with red elastic bands. These do deteriorate, both in sunlight and indoors. Trouble is, I don't know what they're made from... Latex, I suspect, as it's cheap and biodegradeable."

I try to chop up the broken bands, then I plant that stuff in my backyard. I'm hoping for a grove of rubber trees to spring up someday.

--B.G.--

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Ranger bands on 02/27/2013 14:40:51 MST Print View

I like sections of inner tubes for rubber bands. Evidently they were used by Army Rangers for some purpose and have picked up the "ranger band" name. Mountain bike tubes are a good size and you can cut them as thin or fat as you like. I need to get some motorcycle and lawn tractor sizes. The bike tire sizes will make your tent poles behave and the bigger ones will tame a closed cell foam pad. If you can get the right size, you can add to traction to a slippery bear can.

Matthew Hoskin
(mattgugel)

Locale: Kanangra-Boyd NP
Rubber Bands on 02/27/2013 22:48:07 MST Print View

LOL - I only buy the asparagus that has those 2 really nice purple bands. Our Asparagus here must be from the US.