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Gregory Stawicki
(VoiceOfSticks)

Locale: Shenandoah and Dolly Sods!!
Re: Re: R2 on 02/19/2013 11:52:42 MST Print View

I came here to support the Patagonia R2, and I'm glad a few others are as well. Again, not windproof but other than that it's just an amazing piece of gear. Adding to what's already been said my favorite thing about it has been that it adapts. I can exert energy in it and it will breathe ridiculously well (for a fleece), but when I stop moving it insulates. Patagonia designed it to work like fur and I find that it does just that. I have an eVent shell that I wear over it when I go skiing (ie high wind) and it works like a charm)

wander lust
(sol)
paramo on 02/19/2013 12:49:19 MST Print View

You could also ditch the windproof fleece idea and spend a bit my on a Paramo Jacket, which would give you a highly breathable and wind / waterproof garment which does almost everything for you...

Ozzy McKinney
(PorcupinePhobia) - F

Locale: PNW
Stoic Microlith on 02/19/2013 13:00:44 MST Print View

I wear my Backcounty Shift jacket (now the Stoic Microlith) as a mid-layer in winter. It weighs a pound, layers really well, is totally windproof, and is breathable enough for moderate activity. The full zip is nice if you are working hard. Dries really quickly too, which is nice for shwackin in the snow.

Edit- Microlith, not Monolith.

Edited by PorcupinePhobia on 02/19/2013 13:03:43 MST.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Windproof fleece is not mu choice on 02/19/2013 17:06:13 MST Print View

I am a big fan of the Melenzana design. It is not windproof, which I like. It breathes well and dries fast. If I need windproof I put a wind-layer over the top.

The hood on the Melanzana is the best design I've seen. It can be a scarf, a hood, or a highly breathable almost balaclava.

I sleep in mine and can cinch it up with only my mouth and nose exposed.

The grid fleece is lighter than standard fleece, doesn't hold as much water when wet and under a windshirt, warmer in freezing rain because of the lack of water in the fabric.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Settled on 02/20/2013 14:29:16 MST Print View

Ended up settling a bit. I looked at the R1 but it was a little too lightweight. The gridded fleece is not as warm, though, it depends on what you're looking for. I wanted a bit more warmth.

The Melanzana fleece turned out to be a little too heavy in the end.

I ended up making a sacrifice- Windproofness. Instead, I'll supplement my fleece with a windshirt. So, I won't need adjustable cuffs and hem because I'm not trying to lock down against the wind. Overall, I save weight.

The fleece I got is an Arcteryx Caliber Zip Neck Sweater. It weighs in at 10.9oz, versus the Patagonia R1 pullover's 11.3oz, so I actually save a little weight and this material is not gridded. It feels thicker and warmer for no weight penalty (but you have to pay for it.)

Still, I slipped underneath the $100 mark by finding this on sale. It looks sharp, too- added bonus!

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Settled on 02/21/2013 13:07:24 MST Print View

"I ended up making a sacrifice- Windproofness. Instead, I'll supplement my fleece with a windshirt."

Windproof fleece is terrible stuff. Like softshells, it is fine for commuting or running errands around town, but is just doesn't breath well. A windshirt layered with a fleece and base layer is great for cold damp conditions.

IMHO, any of the light breathable fleece materials will work. Add Power Stretch to R1 and the rest. You can wear them comfortably under your rain shell too, adding warmth and moisture transfer and getting the cold rain shell off your shoulders and arms. You'll like your fleece for sleep as well.

I like a full zip hoody for all-around versatility. Vests are my favorite summer day hike backup insulation; my Power Stretch vest is just 8oz and takes up little room. You can find used 200W items for pennies.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
-1 on Hoods on 02/21/2013 13:09:14 MST Print View

I really dislike most hoods. They get in my way, and they rarely fit my head just right. I prefer to combine a zip neck and a hat. I tolerate a hood for my rain shell and nothing else.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: -1 on Hoods on 02/21/2013 13:26:38 MST Print View

To each his own there. I like a hood as it can't get lost or blow away and protects neck and ears. A hood can sit loose and vent a bit, or can be pulled in to act more like a balaclava. A hat is on or off.

I have an R.5 beanie that is great supplement to my summer day hiking kit where I wouldn't have a full hoody. I have a stuff sack with light vest, beanie and liner gloves in case the weather gets stinky.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Hoods on 02/21/2013 13:50:26 MST Print View

When biking, I cannot wear a hood. I just can't. Even when I bike without a helmet, like commuting 1 mile to my campus on quiet roads (judge me if you will) I can't risk the hood cutting off my peripherals or falling too far down my forehead. Same deal when hiking; I hate looking up for the next blaze and catching a hood in my vision for the umpteenth time. I don't want to experiment with 8 different jackets until I find a hood that works in real life as well as the store.

When it rains, I either allow myself to get wet or I wear a rain shell combined with a wide-brim hat. I have a nice Tilley hat for just such a purpose, and when I start doing extended backpacking I'll pack an OR Halo or something. If it's thunderstorm raining outside, I won't go biking.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Hoods on 02/21/2013 14:54:52 MST Print View

Yeah, hoods and bikes don't mix well--- like suicidal. a hood on a fleece is a camp thing. A properly designed hood for a rain shell should have some drawstrings to pull the sides back.

A baseball cap can cure some sloppy hoods--- the bill will swing the hood with your head rather than getting a closeup view of the latest 2.5 layer inner coating.

The hoods that are designed to accommodate a climbing helmet are a pain for those who don't need the helmet option. Lateral and rear drawstrings are a must for those larger hoods. I prefer a built in visor too.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.com
Visor on 02/21/2013 15:27:12 MST Print View

I think a lot of businesses look at the whole helmet thing and don't see a lost customer when it comes to a hood that's too big, whereas they do see a profit loss in one that is too small. A shame. helmets become the default.

Your other comment was hugely useful, though. Rather than wear a baseball cap, an UL visor or a GoLite visor would do wonderfully for keeping the hood out of the way. I'll try it.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Cap/visor on 02/21/2013 15:53:24 MST Print View

I wear the Melanzana or other hoody and use the hood a lot this time of year, but I do wear it over a baseball style cap and with the hood cinched tight.

This creates a tight fit and no reduction in peripheral vision.

Same thing should hold true with a visor, I'd think.