Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013
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Matthew Naylor
(mrnlegato)

Locale: Mid-Atlantic
Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 on 02/14/2013 13:02:38 MST Print View

My wife and I are trying to make a PCT thruhike happen this year, but we will not know if it is possible until late March due to my research project's success (yay) or failure (keep working through summer). So we have a variety of backup plans:
1) PCT, NOBO, early May departure
2) PCT, SOBO, mid-June departure
3) JMT, late summer departure
4) become lifelong opportunistic section hikers

Regardless, I've been gathering gear to cover my bases so that we can get up and go within one month of confirmation. I'd appreciate your thoughts, I'm amazed that you derive so much pleasure from browsing these!

Notes:
--As a grad student, affordability from here on out is important, so I'm only ounce-pinching when I can afford it or if I'm buying it new.
--My wife has had some discomfort with her back during lightweight backpacking, so getting her ultralight is top priority; I'm second priority, but desirous.
--My wife does run cold on average (~120lb, 5'4"). I tend to be warm (200lb, 5'11")
--For long stretches of the PCT (ie KM to VVR) I would prefer carrying more food than costly hitches to independence, etc.

-----------------------
Key:
all in REAL ounces (I measured it myself if I own it)
* will be purchased
** will be upgraded to a lighter product if finances allow

-----------------------
::MY LIST::
TOTAL (w/o in hand or special): 325.5 oz / 20.3 lb

Main Gear: 140.8
**Osprey Aether 70, 89 (would like the MLD Exodus)
Marmot Helium 15, 31
*Silk sleeping bag liner, 4.6
*Exped Synmat UL 7 Med, 16.2 (any crinkling of NeoAir is unacceptable for us)

Packed Clothing: 65.1
**Montbell Down Parka, 16.1 (I think a UL Down instead would be more appropriate, but $)
*Frogg Toggs / Driducks rain jacket, 6.0
*Frogg Toggs / Driducks rain pants, 6.0
Salomon Fast Wing hoodie wind shirt, 5.0 (not water resistant... should I treat it?)
Icebreaker Bodyfit 200 long sleeve, 8.9
quick dry T-shirt, 4.6
quick dry running shorts, 5.0
*merino long underwear bottoms, 6.0 (sleeping, extra warmth on cold days)
extra underwear, 3.0
extra boxers, 3.0
extra hiking socks, 1.5

Accessories: 25.6
sunglasses w/strap, 0.9
insect head net, 1.1
desert hat, 3.4
Buff, 1.3
bandanna, 0.9
toilet kit, 4 (approx)
cleanliness kit, 9 (approx)
first aid kit, 5 (approx)

Kitchen: 29.6
Gossamer Gear Bearister w/ Opsak, 6.1
Snow Peak Ti 1L Pot, 6.1
Caldera TiTri (full kit) w/sleeve+Esbit, 6.3 (could remove the wood-burning bits for some oz)
alcohol bottle empty, 1.0
REI Ti mug, 2.1
Ti spork, 0.6
kitchen kit, 2.5
Lawson plastic flask, 2.9 (libations!)
fire kit, 2.0

Tools: 24.8
Platypus BigZip 3L w/tube, 5.6
Platypus gravity filter system 2x4L bags, 11.0 (could shave oz by cutting the tubes some, but I like the extra storage bags for the desert stretches; for medical reasons I cannot flirt with dehydration)
*Brunton 7NDL compass, 0.9
SOG Flash 2, 2.9
paracord bundle, 2.4
repair items+tape, 2.0

Electronics: 39.6
Petzl AAA headlamp, 2.8
PrincetonTec Pulsar, 0.3
extra AAA batteries, 2.7
Droid Incredible 2 w/Otterbox Defender, 6.9
Seattle Sports dry bag for phone, 2.1
homemade solar charger w/6000mAh battery, 11.8
AA/AAA battery charger, 1.5
wall charger + cable, 2.0
*point-and-shoot camera, 8.5 (saving up for the RX100...)
extra camera battery, 1.0

In Hand: 47.5
*GoLite Chrome Dome, 8.0
*Gossamer Gear LT4S, 10.2
Columbia Omnishade long sleeve, 8.6
underwear, 3.4
EMS zipoff pants, 14.4
socks, 2.9

Special: 76.3
large BearVault, 41
Camp Corsa iceaxe 70cm, 8.0
Kahtoola KTS Steel L/M, 23.3 (heavy, yes, but they're what I've got)
*Rocky Goretex Socks, 4.0

-----------------------
::WIFE'S LIST::
TOTAL (w/o in hand or special): 191.1oz / 11.9 lb

Main Gear: 97.4
ZPacks Hexamid Twin w/cuben groundsheet, 19
*Gossamer Gear Mariposa Plus + liner, 27.6
Marmot Helium 15, 31
*Silk sleeping bag liner, 4.6
*Exped Synmat UL 7 Small, 15.2

Packed Clothing: 55.6
merino long sleeve top, 4.8
quick dry tank top, 4.6
underwear, 0.9
sports bra, 4.1
socks, 2.4
running shorts, 3.3
merino long underwear bottoms, 5.9
Montbell Down Parka, 12.5
*Frogg Toggs / Driducks rain jacket, 6.0
*Frogg Toggs / Driducks rain pants, 6.0
Norrona Offtrack wind shirt, 5.1 (not water resistant... should I treat it?)

Accessories: 20.6
sunglasses w/strap, 0.9
insect head net, 1.1
desert hat, 3.4
Buff, 1.3
bandanna, 0.9
toilet kit, 4 (approx)
cleanliness kit, 9 (approx)

Kitchen: 2.7
REI Ti mug, 2.1
Ti spork, 0.6

Tools: 11.1
Platypus BigZip 3L w/tube, 5.6
Leatherman Juice CS4, 5.5

Electronics: 3.7
PrincetonTec AAA headlamp, 3.4
PrincetonTec Pulsar, 0.3

In Hand: 43.0
*GoLite Chrome Dome, 8.0
Leki Diva Aergon poles, 15.8
merino long sleeve top, 4.4
underwear, 0.9
sports bra, 4.1
EMS pants, 7.4
socks, 2.4

Special: 23.4
*Camp Corsa iceaxe 50cm, 8.0
*Kahtoola Microspikes S, 11.4
*Rocky Goretex Socks, 4.0
-------------------------

Thanks folks!
Matt

Edited by mrnlegato on 02/14/2013 17:08:41 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 on 02/14/2013 13:11:17 MST Print View

"large BearVault, 24.8"

That is not the correct weight.

--B.G.--

Matthew Naylor
(mrnlegato)

Locale: Mid-Atlantic
Re: Re: Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 on 02/14/2013 13:14:12 MST Print View

Fixed according to manufacturer specs.

Amy Lauterbach
(drongobird) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 - electronics on 02/14/2013 14:11:04 MST Print View

About the electronics:
Petzl AAA headlamp, 2.8
PrincetonTec Pulsar, 0.3
extra AAA batteries, 2.7
Droid Incredible 2 w/Otterbox Defender, 6.9
Seattle Sports dry bag for phone, 2.1
homemade solar charger w/6000mAh battery, 11.8
AA/AAA battery charger, 1.5
wall charger + cable, 2.0
*point-and-shoot camera, 8.5 (saving up for the RX100...)
extra camera battery, 1.0

PrincetonTec AAA headlamp, 3.4
PrincetonTec Pulsar, 0.3


We've hiked for 15 or 20 weeks with our iPhone. Just in a standard simple case plus pint size freezer ziplock (for dry weather) or a 4.5x7 Aloksak (when it's raining). In my pocket, I put it in a pint freezer ziplock even when it's not raining just to keep it clean and free of sweat. The Otterbox Defender is overkill, IMO, as is the Seattle Sports dry bag. Ziplocks and an Aloksak are adequate for protection from wet - cheaper and lighter than the things you have listed. Also consider the attach-to-belt-loop system protects it from a fall: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=69747

Seems like you've got overkill on the lighting, unless you're planning extensive night hiking. We carry two petzle e-lites (1 oz each) but frequently don't even use those.

Battery charger and extra batteries as well? What do you need to charge that can't wait until town stops? I don't know the Droid, but for our usage patterns with the iPhone we can go a week between charges. Have you already maximized all the battery saving tips? This article is specific to the iPhone, but maybe you can find a comparable article for a droid: http://adventurealan.com/iphone4gps.htm

An eLite will last for many hours, and you could have a spare set of the the little button batteries if you only had one elite instead of two. You've got an extra camera battery listed. So lighting and camera don't need an on-trail recharge system.

Matthew Naylor
(mrnlegato)

Locale: Mid-Atlantic
Re: Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 - electronics on 02/14/2013 14:24:52 MST Print View

Yeah, I am aware that I would probably be cutting down on the gadget bits. As much of a kick I get out of my solar system, it's hard to argue with just a backup battery. This may be something I decide on the trail. The battery charger was just there to transfer power from the big battery to the AAA's, but yes that's an easy cut. Just charge em in town.

For battery life also, I'm uncertain what daily use will look like. With all the normal tips and apps, I'm confident that it won't last a week on its own, especially since I plan on using it in the evenings and for possibly frequent GPS in snow. I would guess three-four days max.

Scott S
(sschloss1) - F

Locale: New England
Re: Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 on 02/14/2013 16:33:17 MST Print View

A good list overall. A few quibbles:

The FroggToggs/Driducks (I actually prefer O2 Rainshield myself) jackets should be fine. But I doubt that the pants will last the whole way. You can get a ULA rain kilt for $30. There are cheap rain pants out there, too. FWIW, on my thru, I didn't pick up rain pants until Sisters, OR, but I was glad to have them the rest of the way.

I would ditch the Icebreaker l/s shirt. You have plenty of other layers.

Wind shirts should be breatheable--I wouldn't treat it.

Your bandana can be your buff.

9 oz. for cleanliness? You can't stay clean on the trail, especially in the dry sections. Embrace the dirt; save the cleanliness for town.

Ditch the bear hanging kit and opsak. I carried a bear canister in the Sierras and slept with my food everywhere else. Just about every other hiker did the same.

That gravity filter system sounds heavy. Aqua mira weighs 3 oz.

I carried 50' of cord on my thru and never used it once. YMMV.

If it's a low-ish or normal snow year, leave the microspikes/crampons home. A bunch of us heard scary stories about snow on Fuller Ridge and bought microspikes in Idyllwild. They were totally unnecessary, and I didn't get them back for the Sierras (where we had far, far more snow).

Edited by sschloss1 on 02/14/2013 16:33:48 MST.

Bob Bankhead
(wandering_bob) - MLife

Locale: Oregon, USA
Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 on 02/14/2013 16:46:20 MST Print View

My suggestions, based on the information you provided:


1) Wife is cold sleeper, 64 inches tall. Consider a warmer sleeping pad to go under her, especially since you haven't bought it yet. Consider the Thermarest Polite Plus woman's model. PROS - it is $45 cheaper ($110 vs. $155); the interior is unmoveable cored foam, not a laminated insulation sheet which can come loose) so it is a much better insulator (R=4.6 vs. 3.1); it is 2 inches longer (66 vs. 64). CONS - it is 5 ounces heavier (21 vs. 15.2); thinner (1.5 vs. 2.8); bulkier (5x11 vs. 3.3x9). FWIW, I am a side sleeper and find the 1.5" very comfortable - never touch the groud. I exchanged my BA insulated air core pad (3") for this and never looked back.

2) I've had the GravityWorks system. However, while the 4L dirt water bag is nice, you're better served with 4 separate 1L Platy resevoirs for the clean water. Yes, you have to mind the filter while it's working and switch bags as they fill, but then you can divide up the weight easily AND you don't risk loosing all your water to an accidental puncture or other incident. Given your medical condition, that's highly significant.

3) Call Cascade Designs to order the Caldera Caddy that fits your Ti-Tri setup. Depending on the size needed, the weight is 2.5-3 ounces. Use the smaller section for a bowl and the larger for a cup. I taped a paper scale to each section of mine and now have 2 measuring cups that show the number of fluid ounces contained. No more guesswork; no more sepate cup and/or bowl to carry, and my Caldera Cone, stove, and support items are safely contained. Besides, the usual BPing cup only holds at best 8 oz, and when I brew my coffee or tea, I want enough to last through my meal and beyond.

4) Consider ditching one of the sporks in favor of a long-handled titanium spoon. It makes stirring the bottom of boiling bags and freeze-dried meals easier and far less messy. I've never found sporks to be worth their weight. Yuo get only a marginally effective spoon and fork, and I've not found anything that a spoon alone can't handle on the trail.

5) I didn't see any ground cloths to go under your sleeping pads. Your shelter has a netting floor and you'll need them. Try the Gossamer Gear polycryo sheet (large) or the ThinLite foam pad in 1/8th inch thickness (about 2 oz). The pad adds minimal insulation (R=0.2) but the foam will better protect your inflatable pads from sharp objects on the ground, especially in the desert sections. It may be possible to buy the Evazote foam pads on-line in widths great enough to hold both pads side by side.

CAVEAT: This advice is worth precisely what you paid for it (but you DID ask). YMMV.

Edited by wandering_bob on 02/14/2013 16:59:46 MST.

Matthew Naylor
(mrnlegato)

Locale: Mid-Atlantic
sleeping pad / ground cloth on 02/14/2013 17:07:59 MST Print View

I have also read great things about the Exped Downmat UL 7 at 18.7oz, R5.9 for small; a little bit better specs than the Prolite, but also more expensive...

And I forgot to note that my weight for the Hexamid includes a cuben ground tarp - adding that now.

This is all very helpful!

Bob Bankhead
(wandering_bob) - MLife

Locale: Oregon, USA
Re: sleeping pad / ground cloth on 02/14/2013 17:39:56 MST Print View

If you do go with a down-filled mat, you'd be wise to consider the Instaflator so you're not adding moisture to the down from your breath. I just received mine for our Prolite Plus mats. No more getting dizzy blowing them up at 12,000 feet.

http://www.themillair.com


1.7 ounces

$3.95

Edited by wandering_bob on 02/14/2013 17:42:12 MST.

Katy Anderson
(KatyAnderson) - F
gear list on 02/17/2013 20:15:41 MST Print View

You say that your wife sleeps cold and you run warm, yet you are both bringing the same 15 degree sleeping bags. Your wife will be fine in hers and you can probably get away with a 30 degree bag.

A few things to consider leaving at home (or not purchasing)
* sleeping bag liner
* rain pants
* hiking umbrella

You are both bringing too many clothes. Pare it down to the point that on a cold evening around camp you will be wearing every stitch of clothing that you brought.
E.g. you are have two sets of hiking clothes on your list, shorts and t-shirt as well as zip-offs and long sleeved nylon shirt, just bring either one or the other, not both.
However you do need to add a woolie, warm hat to your list, you will be cold without it no matter what other clothing you bring.

Richard Scruggs
(JRScruggs) - MLife

Locale: Oregon
Re: Gear List for a couple's *tentative* PCT 2013 on 02/18/2013 01:44:00 MST Print View

So many items, so little time!!!

Here's a few comments/suggestions --

Ditching that five-and-a-half pound pack for your plan/hope to get an MLD Exodus would really put a dent in your base weight. That looks like it may results in eliminating 3 pounds or more, even with the framed version of the Exodus.

But would the Exodus (3500 cu in) hold the Bear Vault along with all the other stuff you list, especially if you are going to be carrying extra food to exend distances between resupply points?

When we use our Bear Vault (BV-300), it carries best in my Granite Gear Vapor Trail or, if there's a lot of other bulky stuff, my GoLite Quest.

Two of the Platypus Big Zip 3L Platypus w/tubes? Think someone else already posted a suggestion that the Big Zip 3L platys be replaced with a couple of smaller (1L?)platys for each of you, and you can just swap out the 1L platys under the hose from the dirty water reservoir when filtering -- and you could ditch the GravityWorks 4L "clean water" platy.

Others' comments re lights, batteries, phone cases, etc. are good, too, although we do make use of odor-proof bags (even with the Bear Vault).

Edited by JRScruggs on 02/18/2013 01:46:13 MST.