Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses


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Lyan Jordan
(redmonk)

Locale: Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/09/2013 15:49:36 MST Print View

Zenni is where I get my prescription sun glasses for backpacking.

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
"Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses" on 02/09/2013 19:57:47 MST Print View

I wear Cocoons over my glasses. I know, I know, so does your grandmother. However, for your small frames, Cocoons makes an ubergroovy style that won't make you blush....much. Most importantly, Cocoons block sun from above and the side, and are polarized. Plus they block dirt and rain from from your real glasses.

Amy Lauterbach
(drongobird) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/10/2013 12:09:36 MST Print View

Doh, I forgot to mention that For Eyes (or probably any optical store) will put lenses in whatever frame you bring in, you don't have to buy the frames from them. So if you've got a pair of sunglasses that fits, doesn't slide around your face, etc, then take them to For Eyes and have them put in the prescription lenses you need.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: re: Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/10/2013 14:02:49 MST Print View

> On the "Select Lens" page you will see the options for Tint and Polarized
And a comment that you can make sunglasses out of any scrip.

Thanks Greg for posting this!

Cheers

Amy Lauterbach
(drongobird) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/10/2013 18:33:26 MST Print View

Hey - thanks everybody for the references to Zenni Optical. I had never looked at buying glasses online, but now I'm ready to give it a try :)

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/10/2013 18:50:03 MST Print View

The biggest challenge (aside from sorting through the Zenni site) is getting you "pupilary distance". And if you are doing bifocals you need "near" and "far".

I was Very explicit when I got my eye exam: "Rx is to include the PD." It is usually done by the optometrist (who wants to sell you $250 frames and $250 lenses)rather than the opthamologist who is looking for disease and determining your Rx. After the exam I just sat there until I got the number.

If they are nice, they may just give to you from your last exam.

Edited by greg23 on 02/10/2013 18:53:28 MST.

Michael L
(mpl_35) - MLife

Locale: The Palouse
Re: Re: Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/10/2013 18:59:26 MST Print View

Getting the right height is also important. Not everybody wears glasses with their pupils right in the middle of the lenses. Many time it varies by frames.

The stronger the rx or if you have an astigmatism it does matter. That's why I wouldn't trust online vendors except for mild rxs.

Susan Papuga
(veganaloha) - M

Locale: USA
Re: Re: Re: re: Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses on 02/12/2013 17:33:32 MST Print View

Thanks Greg!

When I searched the site I only saw the clip-pns or goggles.

Susan

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
39dollarglasses on 02/12/2013 17:53:29 MST Print View

I have had nothing but great service and experience with 39dollarglasses.com.

One pair I had developed cracks around edge of a lense 5 mos later, sent it in and they remade the lenses no problem.

They do sunglasses for sure.

Personally, I dont take sunglasses. My glasses provide UV protection, and I know how to squint when needed. I also dont have any issues with glasses on the trail. A little water, a dab of soap, rubadubdub, and rinse, shake, put on. Never wipe glasses with anything but a clean tissue, after a wash, or you WILL put micro fine scratches in the lens coatings. I dont even wipe, I gently dap or pat the water off with tissue when I do dry them.

Edited by livingontheroad on 02/12/2013 17:55:39 MST.

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
My glasses provide UV protection on 02/12/2013 20:24:52 MST Print View

"My glasses provide UV protection". Hmmm. Are you sure about that. How?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: My glasses provide UV protection on 02/12/2013 20:30:16 MST Print View

"Are you sure about that. How?"

With some materials, they do it with a thin transparent coating. With other materials, the UV-blocker is mixed in.

--B.G.--

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
"Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses" on 02/12/2013 20:51:59 MST Print View

O.K. so we're not talking about Transitions lenses, right? Just regular glasses. Hey, could be that I'm really behind on new technology, but I did just recently buy a new pair of expensive glasses from UC Berkeley optometry center and darn it, I still need sunglasses. These lenses do nothing to block UV/UBF on their own, as far as I can tell. And I was told by staff that I needed uv/ubf sunglasses with these lenses.(Yeah yeah it's a marketing ploy etc.) I can't imagine anyone saying that climbers on snow, for example, can get by without sunglasses. But sunlight in summer at high altitude reflecting off granite is also potentially damaging. "Squinting" on a glacier won't cut it; nor at 10,00 feet in the summer. The proof: yes, it's anecdotal, but it sure feels a lot better when I put on uv/ubf sunglasses. So sure, no proof at all, just intuition.

Something tells me Bob will show me the contrary numbers. And I'm always wanting to learn.

I also grew up believing that car windows block UV/UBF rays. Not so.

Edited by book on 02/12/2013 21:03:43 MST.

stephan q
(khumbukat) - F
+1 for Opticus on 02/12/2013 21:20:06 MST Print View

Howdy,
if you need true mountaineering/glacier glasses for extended periods at high altitude, these folks are my choice. The glass they use is the highest quality, and there are several options for color and transmitted light. I sent them a standard pair of Julbo Dru and they fitted them with the best lenses i've ever used. The Drus fit my face, but they can put lenses in your choice of frame. Not cheap, but the security is worth it.
I offered my Optician the work, and was told his price would be much higher. He reviewed their site and was quite impressed. About $200 as i recall. stephan

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: "Source for UL Precription Sunglasses or Lenses" on 02/12/2013 21:48:08 MST Print View

"Something tells me Bob will show me the contrary numbers."

I have no contrary numbers.

The last time that I was in for prescription eyeglasses, I was asked a few questions about my lifestyle to indicate my use. I told them I wanted one set with clear lenses, and one set with dark lenses (sunglasses). I spend a lot of time outdoors at high elevation, so that dictated UV and a rather dark shade of sunglasses. Since I spend time out skiing and backpacking, I needed frames that were fairly rugged.

"I also grew up believing that car windows block UV/UBF rays. Not so."

Some do. Some don't. 'You pays your money and you takes your chances!'

It pays to ask a lot of questions on a big ticket purchase.

--B.G.--

Ben B
(brillb)

Locale: Northeast USA
Silhouette and Rudy Project on 02/16/2013 22:32:15 MST Print View

There's really two questions here. Are you looking for ultralight glasses, or glasses that are great on a backpacking trip?

If you want the lightest glasses frames possible - get Silhouette. Rimless drilled frames, made from crazy titanium that you can flex and bend in every direction and that are nearly impossible to break. They weigh next to nothing, especially the ones that are just flexible and don't have any hinges. Your eye doctor almost certainly carries them. You can get them clear, of course, and they can also add tinting to make sunglasses out of any clear glasses - just go with a bigger lens if you do that.

If you want a very good pair of sunglasses for the trail - I highly recommend Rudy Project. (www.e-rudy.com) You can get both prescription and non-prescription frames. They're extremely durable, designed for activities like mountain biking.

I also have glasses from Zenni Optical, as a few others have mentioned. I really don't wear them ever, though - they're clearly low quality just as you would expect from their price. Still, it's great to leave a pair of clear and tinted glasses in the car as spares, or at work in my desk drawer. They are perfect as spare backup glasses.

Rex Sanders
(Rex) - M

Locale: Central California Coast
Measuring PD at home, plus a plug for Warby Parker on 02/17/2013 12:16:11 MST Print View

If you have a computer with a web cam, a credit card, and a well-lighted room, you can measure your PD at home:

http://pd.warbyparker.com/

I used this measurement to buy three pairs of Warby Parker glasses, worked great.

The Warby Parker glasses I bought are heavier than my old glasses, but their higher-priced TITANIUM frames should be lighter.

$95 glasses, $150 sunglasses, virtual try-ons, free at-home frame try-ons, free shipping, 30-day returns, modern styles, and they donate a pair for every pair you buy.

Helped me realize the astounding markups in prescription glasses.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Measuring PD at home, plus a plug for Warby Parker on 02/17/2013 12:33:58 MST Print View

I love Warby Parker, unfortunately they don't do bifocals. Hoping they change that soon!