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Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Taking an Enlightened Equipment quilt to the extreme on 02/01/2013 07:19:29 MST Print View

I just wanted to post my observations. Keep in mind that this was only one night in a backyard, so these aren't long term, repeated results.

Last night temps dropped to 0*F with windchill at -20*F, so I thought, "hey, why not sleep outside?"

I used my EE Rev X 20*F quilt, which has 30% overfill. I slept in an HMG Echo I tarp with inner, on top of a Neoair XTherm and used a Cocoon aircore pillow.

All clothing worn were Items I normally take with me on winter outings.

On my lower self I wore VBL socks, Darn Tough wool socks, Powerstretch tights, nylon hiking pants and Columbia insulated pants (kinda like lightweight ski pants.)

On my top I wore a Smartwool mid weight base layer, Patagonia R1 zip, puffy jacket, light fleece balaclava, a down hood, and fleece gloves.

All night, whether sleeping on my back or side, I was comfortably warm, even my feet. With the right clothing system, it appears I can take this quilt to temps much lower than the rating. Not bad for 24 ounces! Hopefully this will help people considering purchasing or using one of Tim's quilts. It's been a fantastic piece of gear.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Thanks on 02/01/2013 08:12:18 MST Print View

Helpful post.
Of course some people sleep warmer than others.

In my experience, cold sleepers can become warm sleepers over time by spending time adapting to sleeping in the cold.

A good knowledge and experience with your gear helps.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.wordpress.com
Excellent! on 02/01/2013 08:58:27 MST Print View

First off, awesome on having the inspiration. I'm glad I'm not the only one!

I've noticed that sleeping out in the cold more often most definitely has an effect on your warmth and comfort. I spent a week "training" for a cold weather trip in December, and by the end of the week, I was taking my 20º EMS bag ($75 on sale) down to 5º with -10º windchill, with no insulated pants. I'm not sure if it's cell biology, or just a mental understanding between my body and my brain that I don't have to wake up when i'm a little cold.


This is enough inspiration- I'm going camping tonight.

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Excellent! on 02/01/2013 13:15:31 MST Print View

Cool, Max, have fun!

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Excellent! on 02/01/2013 13:54:40 MST Print View

I've already done three solo snow trips. Get out there! Last said -4F.
Duane

Jason G
(JasonG) - F

Locale: iceberg lake
core temp on 02/01/2013 15:32:57 MST Print View

"I've noticed that sleeping out in the cold more often most definitely has an effect on your warmth and comfort. I spent a week "training" for a cold weather trip in December, and by the end of the week, I was taking my 20º EMS bag ($75 on sale) down to 5º with -10º windchill, with no insulated pants. I'm not sure if it's cell biology, or just a mental understanding between my body and my brain that I don't have to wake up when i'm a little cold."


It definitely helps. It also dramatically increases your metabolism if you are on a weight loss kick. after college i had a few extra beer lbs and i started sleeping with only a sheet no matter what and taking luke warm/cold showers and every morning chug a litre of ice water. the belly came right off and now im a pretty warm sleeper!

Art Tyszka
(arttyszka) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Adjusting to the cold on 02/01/2013 15:43:46 MST Print View

I completely agree that your body adjusts. I'm not sure what the physiology is, but here in MN it was -15F this morning, not the wind chill, the temperature. After a week or two of this, then it's suddenly in the teens, and it seriously feels "mild".

A friend of mine was stationed in Saudi Arabia for about 6 months in the Air Force, he tells similar stories. During the days it would hit 120F and as an aircraft mechanic they were outside or in un-airconditioned hangers doing most of their work. Then at night the temps would fall into the 80'sF and everyone literally put on their Winter parkas. Your body adjusts, and all it knows is that there was just a 40F temp swing.

Another friend of mine works here in MN outside all the time as a telecom wire splicer. After being outside for 8 hours he comes home and then spends even the cold days like today in only a t-shirt. I've seen him walk 100' in these kind of temps up my driveway in just a t-shirt like it was nothing. I'm sitting in my house with my long sleeve fleece zipped up . . .

I have a RevX 20F with 30% overstuff, so figure it's good to 15F or better with just a base layer. The coldest I've slept in it so far is 30F and it was toasty with just boxers and a very thin merino t-shirt.

Max Dilthey
(mdilthey) - M

Locale: MaxTheCyclist.wordpress.com
Cold Metabolism on 02/01/2013 17:37:21 MST Print View

I notice also that my fingers and face get cold much slower while biking than they did at the beginning of the season. i wouldn't know anything about the weight loss part, though... my metabolism is so high that I have to keep trying to maintain body weight, rather than getting rid of it.

Stephen M
(stephenm) - MLife

Locale: Lartnec Nagihcim
Re: Cold Metabolism on 02/01/2013 18:30:15 MST Print View

I was in Highlands of Thailand 6-7 years ago and we where walking around in shorts and t-shirts while the locals where as wrapped up as I would normally be in winter, the temps were about 80f.

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Re: Cold Metabolism on 02/01/2013 18:42:00 MST Print View

Part of the reason I included the "this was a one-time only experience" was because I may or may not be able to replicate the warmth. Maybe my metabolism was unusually high last night. Maybe since I wasn't hiking all day, it affected how I slept.

I do know that my two other bags, a Marmot Pinnacle 15F and Montbell #3 30F, were barely true to their ratings. I could take them to their respective ratings, but was usually slightly cold.

At any rate, I'd have to do this a handful of times in different situations to see if I can consistently take the quilt to 0F.

Eric Johnson
(unimog) - MLife

Locale: Utah
Testing RevX on 02/01/2013 18:47:18 MST Print View

I just received my RevX 20 Quilt from a gear swap today! I was thinking about the same thing - I just need a better pad to test with. I want to verify just how much clothing I need in addition to the quilt to get down to 10 or 20. I'm a cold sleeper, so I think I will need a little. This is also my first quilt, so I need to test out configuration options also.

Ben Wortman
(bwortman)

Locale: Nebraska
rev on 02/02/2013 08:02:53 MST Print View

I uses to have a rev X quilt very much like a Eric's and I've had it down in the low thirties. It was plenty warm. I think I could have taken it another 10 or 15 degrees without a problem

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Cold Metabolism on 02/02/2013 09:21:05 MST Print View

:) The night I was out with the sub zero temps, the next morning after moving around and starting to pack up after breakfast and letting my stoves cool down, the temp got up to the single digits, I had to take my down jacket off and leave my down vest on, I was nice and warm, very comfortable. I ran my stoves all morning to fix breakfast, listen to their music and as a hand warmer when packing gear up, the tent is the hardest as the material is so cold, the bag was not easy either with the DL lining, pushing the air out.
Duane