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Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Calling Sarbar, on 04/13/2007 04:36:58 MDT Print View

Sarah,

I once tried to contact you through your website but got no response, hence now i'm contacting you through this forum.

I want to make your Rendezvous's Trail Energy Bars, but have some questions about the recipe:

1/ 18 oz jar of PB, is that fluid oz or mass oz?
2/ how much is a cup? According to convert.exe 1 cup = 0,5 pint = 0.23 liters
3/ 1 stick of buter in Holland is a quarter of a kilo, about 9 oz, is that right?
4/ my bag of marshmellows is about 11 oz, is that the correct size for the recipe?
5/ How much is one box of cereal?

Makes me look like a cooking virgin these questions, but i'm not, different unit systems just make it a bit difficult.

Thanx, Eins

Edited by EinsteinX on 04/13/2007 04:38:15 MDT.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Calling Sarbar, on 04/13/2007 09:36:40 MDT Print View

Well, poo, I wonder if my reply to you gotten eaten by a Spam filter on your side? I remember writing you!

Anyhoo..let's see!

Hoo-boy, that is what I get for posting a rough recipe from another forum user ;-)

A box of cereal would be most likely 11 ounces dry weight.
1 stick of butter in the US is 1/2 cup (or 1/4 of a lb, 4 ounces in US weight) 1 stick is a quarter of a box if that helps!

Your bag of marshmallows is fine. Some bags are bigger, I doubt it would hurt to add more if you wanted. I add more all the time to rice krispie treats. ;-)

The peanut butter: 18 ounces is the weight of it, so I'd weigh your PB if you can't get in in a equiv. size jar.

Hope that helps!

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Re: Calling Sarbar, on 04/13/2007 12:49:23 MDT Print View

Yep that helps a lot.

And it's not the problem that you post a recipe of someone else. The units are the problem. But thats why i have my trusty convert.exe program. It only doesn't calculate boxes and sticks into metric system. :D

And i didn't find you're email in my gmails spam filter i'm affraid.

Thanx a lot, Eins

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Re: Re: Calling Sarbar, on 04/13/2007 13:20:29 MDT Print View

You mean a "box" isn't a measurement? ;-) Hehheh!

I am better with my recipes versus the ones that are sent to me. I try to keep them standard. Usually I mean to go back and change those ones that I post, and er, I get busy and forget!

I do get a number of emails from hikers around the world asking about conversions. It is easy to forget as an American, that most of the world doesn't use our measuring system! I really need to do a conversion chart on the website. That might be a fun rainy day project!

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
Re: Re: Re: Re: Calling Sarbar, on 05/02/2007 07:26:25 MDT Print View

Sarah - I have just finished creating a conversion chart if you would like a copy for your site.

I also have a link to the conversion program that one of the others mentioned in this thread. You may want to tell your readers about it.

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Results on 05/03/2007 08:54:21 MDT Print View

Well last week I made the bars. They were easy to make, tasty and nutricious. Only problem was that they are really fat. Now from a calories/oz point of view that's a good thing, but the ambient temperature this weekend was about 70 degrees so that meant ending up with very fatty hands.

I think there is a difference between Dutch peanut butter and American and the marshmellows may also have a different consistency, so I wonder how that influences the recipe. Are the bars supposted to be so fatty?

Next time I'm thinking of adding more powdered milk as this seemed to make the whole melted mixture less liquid. I hope this'll make the bars less fatty.

But in general I was pretty happy with the recipe. I even had one for breakfast: we were low on water so my planned breakfast with cereals would've used up some precious water.

Eins

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Re: Results on 05/03/2007 14:07:06 MDT Print View

Hmmm...is your peanut butter over there what we'd consider "natural"? (Ie..it separates and needs to be mixed up?) I have a feeling his recipe used American PB, the shelf stable stays mixed up kind, that uses added oils. (Jiff, etc)
But yes, the recipe is pretty fatty overall. I'd hedge it would be a good recipe for fall/spring when it isn't hot.

Einstein X
(EinsteinX) - F

Locale: The Netherlands
Re: Re: Re: Results on 05/04/2007 04:35:14 MDT Print View

I agree with you that it seems this recipe is better for cool weather hiking. When the bars come out of the fridge they seem fine. I prefer to walk in cool weather anyway, but sometimes you pick a weekend and it turns out to be quite warm. Anyway this is the PB I used:

http://www.calve.nl/producten/producten.php?keuze=producten&get=853129&productid=534547

And since I guess your Dutch might be a bit rusty, here the list of ingredients:

93% peanuts, vegetable oil, vegetable fat, salt.

It has 58% fat content.

Eins