EE Rev Fabric Advice
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Jennifer Mitol
(Jenmitol) - M

Locale: In my dreams....
Just buy it already!!! on 02/02/2013 07:49:07 MST Print View

Seriously Duane...put your libra tendencies aside and just make the order. 10d/10d and settle in for the wait...then enjoy!! With the bivy you'll be super happy. Tim makes wonderful stuff...and his customer service rocks.

Heck, I might even loan you my shedding wet pooch for a while..just so you can see how safe you'll be...

...Chuck in water

Art Tyszka
(arttyszka) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Plenty tough on 02/02/2013 08:35:52 MST Print View

Jennifer, the pack your dog carries looks familiar ;-)

Guinness at Jay Cooke

Duane, I can't speak specifically for the 10D as mine is 8D, but close enough me thinks. It's plenty strong, I have no worries that anything is going to happen to it with the proper care. But it's like any other piece of ultra light gear, take care of it and don't treat it like it's a $40 sleeping bag from Cabelas. My dog has "claimed" it a couple times for himself before I got in the tent and other than the dirt that needs to be wiped off, there's no problems from his nails, so that passes my test.

Edited by arttyszka on 02/02/2013 08:37:01 MST.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Plenty tough on 02/02/2013 09:06:26 MST Print View

I will add only one thing on fabric durability. Though I trust and personally use 10d(formerly known as 8d, eightD, and now nobul) on all my quilts I don't recommend it for through hikers as the extended use and difficulty of field repair make it less desirable for that application.

-Tim

Aaron Davis
(ardavis324) - F
8D vs 10D on 02/02/2013 09:06:33 MST Print View

//

Edited by ardavis324 on 02/02/2013 09:08:04 MST.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Just buy it already!!! on 02/02/2013 09:10:13 MST Print View

You two are killing me with the dog pics.
I've been patient so far, at least I think that may be my excuse. I have the money so that is not the issue, just hate making the wrong descision. Thank you for the hearty endorsement of those lighter fabrics. I had received a reply back from Tim the same night I sent him an email a few nights ago over when he would have info back up on his cuben quilts. I guess he does not sell that many and no one wants one until they are gone.:) Another reason I've been hedging, my WM Caribou bag weights 1.5 lbs., so a quilt at 20-21 oz. was not much incentive to move forward. However, if I can get something down to 18 oz. or less, maybe I'd go ahead, plus I'm thinking the bivy may enable me to get a over stuffed 40 degree bag which could take me to the 30's which is what I really need for the Sierra in the summer and may be warm enough to the upper 20's with the bivy. I think those lighter fabrics would get me under 18 oz., but I hate the expense of what a cuben quilt will run from him. I'll hang in there for a few more weeks until he gets his cuben quilt up so I can run some numbers. If it takes a month to get a quilt, I have plenty of time for Spring bping, I'm enjoying my snowcamping with my old stoves for now. Don't want to get caught in the thru hikers rush for gear.
Duane

PS: I also recieved a reply from Matt at ZPacks, for the size of quilt and temp rating, he told me around 17.5 +-, so if Tim has the same, a big savings in money to get the Revelation with the 8D.

Edited by hikerduane on 02/02/2013 09:13:32 MST.

Art Tyszka
(arttyszka) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
8 = 10 on 02/02/2013 09:12:38 MST Print View

Thanks Tim, I didn't realize that 8D is now 10D. Good to know.

Mike Van
(Mike777) - MLife
Re: Re: Plenty tough on 02/02/2013 09:24:05 MST Print View

Would you elaborate a bit Tim? Though I'm not a through hiker I'm curious to know if a big enough piece of Tear-Aid wouldn't resolve most emergencies. Thanks!

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Re: Plenty tough on 02/02/2013 10:31:31 MST Print View

Mike,

You're probably right. An adhesive repair should be fine on 10d. I'm thinking of dental floss sewing which would end up making it worse and expanding the damage most likely due to the thin nature of the fabric.

-Tim

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Plenty tough on 02/02/2013 11:07:39 MST Print View

I have Nobul sleeping bag lining. Used it about 20 nights. No problem yet. Very comfortable against skin.

But, it is very light so I think it would rip more easily than heavier fabric.

If you value light weight and are careful with your gear, it's probably fine. It might rip after a few years where heavier fabric would last longer. If you have dogs clawing it or rambunctious teenagers it might not be the best choice.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Re on 02/02/2013 17:23:13 MST Print View

One thing I like about EE is the features, that is pretty important to me.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Plenty tough on 02/03/2013 11:58:22 MST Print View

Since I've been dogless for 10 years now, I wonder if the lighter material on the exterior and the next weight up on the inside since that is where all the abrasiion will be for me makes sense? You can still save a tiny bit of weight. I'd hate to start losing down unexpectly. I'll have all my info here soon, don't know if I'll go for three new pieces of gear this year or just a pack and either a quilt or tarp. After I get new glass' I can decide. Thanks for bearing with me Tim and all.
Duane

Art Tyszka
(arttyszka) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Abrasion? on 02/03/2013 13:25:36 MST Print View

Duane, I'm not sure what kind of "abrasion" you're worried about. My dog's nails haven't ripped or scratched the 10D after waling across it a dozen times. I've not had any problems or concerns with the 10D, granted I haven't thru hiked with it either. Take reasonably good care of it and I don't think there's anything to worry about. I'm not saying I'd give it to one of my kids for a sleep over, but it's plenty tough for ultra light hikers.

USA Duane Hall
(hikerduane) - F

Locale: Extreme northern Sierra Nevada
Abrasion? on 02/03/2013 18:08:31 MST Print View

First, my apologies for commenting or throwing out so many questions, just wanting as much info as I can gather. I'm used to just buying off the shelf items and one of my bping friends says he is out of the loop on new stuff. My current summer, 7-8 day total pack weight is in the mid 20's, so I've gained some ground the last 8 years. The CA group I have done some trips with are not into UL or SUL, although they may have an item or two, Frank (60 something)is the closest. The last few years we all have done fewer trips together, so I don't have a UL person to bounce ideas off of. I was also going off of Tim's comment about not being suggested for thru hikers. If a thru hiker would use a quilt with the light material, I was thinking how long would it last me using the quilt for 20+ nights a year or so. Extrapalating (sp?) that over say 4-5 years, would it be worth my investment? If considered as a UL piece of gear that only has a limited life, that may be fine and what was to be expected like some of the cuben material bps.

Thanks Art, that helps, I've had a playful dog nip my 9 year? old Golite Coal jacket and put a small tear in it, do not know how that material compares to the 10D. I have to replace my silk liners about every 3 years as they get stretched out, I was thinking the 10D might be like the silk. Sounds more and more like 10D for a quilt inside and out is fine. I'm waiting for Tim to post his cuben quilt numbers, as I may only go for either a tarp or quilt.
Fence sitter Duane

J C
(Joomy) - M
Tough choice on 05/05/2013 04:10:52 MDT Print View

Hi Duane, you have my sympathies as I am also somewhat of a fence sitter with these decisions and I'm also trying to decide which fabric to go with on an EE Revelation.

I emailed Tim and asked him about the relative strengths and water resistance of his fabrics. Here is what is told me:

Durability, least to most: Nb1, nb2, im1, im2, 30d

Water resistance, least to most: Nb1, im1, 30d, nb2, im2

So clearly 10D is going to be the most fragile, and IM2 would be fairly tough and quite water resistant. Then again, ancedotal evidence suggests that 10D is plenty tough as long as you are reasonably careful with it.

Full 10D would be the lightest and softest option (and comes in cool all black) but NB1/IM2 might be the more prudent choice for those of us who want a quilt that will last many seasons...