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Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Attaching Buckle To Existing Web Loop on 01/21/2013 11:40:48 MST Print View

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Photos above show one way of attaching a buckle to an existing web loop. Buckle is 1/2" and zip tie is 4" long. Zip tie, with tail snipped, won't register accurately on my scale because it is so light but it weighs somewhere between 1/10th and 1/20th of a gram.

I've used this method quite a few times and it is very secure. You can hide the zip tie's gripper inside the loop if you loop it around only 2 layers of web instead of 3 like in the photos.

I've used this method to replace broken buckles or buckles I wanted to replace with a different type. It also allows one to avoid buckles while sewing. Just sew the loop and add the buckle later.

This method also allows one to a attach a buckle tightly to an item so it tends to hold its position rather than swing in the breeze. This is handy if it is a quick release buckle because the fixed buckle half will hold its position so you can more easily attach the second half of the buckle to it.

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Attaching Buckle To Existing Web Loop on 01/21/2013 17:33:11 MST Print View

Good idea, thanks

Looks like you need to adjust your tension on that test piece : )

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: Attaching Buckle To Existing Web Loop on 01/21/2013 18:36:57 MST Print View

"Looks like you need to adjust your tension on that test piece"

Yes...... or I could knit a sweater with my sewing machine.

David Scheidt
(dscheidt) - F
Re: Re: Re: Attaching Buckle To Existing Web Loop on 01/21/2013 19:11:49 MST Print View

There exist replacement buckles (called, in military buckle language "field expedient" buckles) which have slit in them, so they can be fed onto an existing loop. The good ones are nearly as strong as the originals. No good if you don't have one, of course. But were I to carry around a spare buckle, that's what I'd go for.

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
re: Existing buckle on 01/21/2013 19:41:09 MST Print View

Very clever!!!!

Jared Baker
(simply_light) - MLife

Locale: Midwest, US
Field Replacement Buckles on 01/22/2013 01:15:45 MST Print View

I had to replace a buckle that had broke just last week, only to find that I was out of Field replacement buckles. I ended up taking a small rope saw and cutting the angled slit into a regular buckle and it worked great.

I do like the fact that your idea keeps the buckle nice and tight on the webbing. Any concerns over the zip tie popping loose, especially when cinching down the strap?

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Field Replacement Buckles on 01/22/2013 08:55:48 MST Print View

Jared,

"Any concerns over the zip tie popping loose, especially when cinching down the strap?"

I always have concerns about things popping loose and the zip tie is no exception. Here are my thoughts, in no particular order.


(1)When making stuff I always try to attach crucial gear in at least 2 ways (two straps, two buckles, etc.). If one connection fails the other should keep things attached until I notice and fix it. I wince whenever I see someone on the trail with their sleeping bag or tent attached with only one strap.

(2)About a week ago I used zip ties to attach two 5/8" ladder lock buckles to my pack's waist belt. This should give the attachment technique a pretty good test. So far, so good with 30 lbs of weight in the backpack.

(3) There isn't a lot of direct load on the zip ties. They mostly just keep the webbing from slipping through the slots in the buckle.

(4) I've used the zip ties in this manner at least a dozen times over the last year or so and have no failures but one never knows when a faulty one might come along.

(5) I only use the black zip ties that say they are uv resistant.

(6) I was reluctant to cut off the zip tie tails at first, thinking that leaving the tail on might give the ratchet mechanism another chance to catch hold if it slipped a cog. I doubt that it would, however, so I now cut them. Cutting the tails is very satisfying because I'm saving something like 1/500ths of an ounce every time I do it.

(7) One could install two zip ties and pretty much eliminate the chance of failure. Caution-Do this 10 or 20 times and you've added a gram to your pack.

(8) One could replace the zip ties or supplement the zip ties with cord. I tried this for a while but my knots kept coming loose. This might be due to my poor knot making skills, however.

Daryl

Jared Baker
(simply_light) - MLife

Locale: Midwest, US
Point Taken on 01/22/2013 11:59:08 MST Print View

"(7) One could install two zip ties and pretty much eliminate the chance of failure. Caution-Do this 10 or 20 times and you've added a gram to your pack"

Good Point, the number of times one would even have opportunity to do this, is not even going to register on any scale. So, as long as they are surviving the field tests, no point in not using them in this manner.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Attaching Buckle To Existing Web Loop on 01/22/2013 13:46:12 MST Print View

Neat! I will remember that one.

Cheers

Tanner M
(Tan68)
Re: cable/zip ties on 04/16/2013 13:16:50 MDT Print View

this is a pretty good idea.

cable ties are pretty easy to remove without tools.

for diving, you (should) connect stuff with cable ties for this reason. i might use a brass butterfly clip with SS spring, but the gear is attached to it with cable ties rather than nylon cord.

a cable tie can be broken by twisting it. i can twist my flashlight to break it free from the cable tie and butterfly clip. if i want to...

for this reason, i use two cable ties on everything. i can still break them if i need to, but not as easily.

at work, i have used a writing pen or house key to snap them. if you can get something stiff in there, the cable tie is gone. this works for pretty thick cable ties like the one shown. ticker ties might need more leverage.

anyway, just a note that they can come free with a twist. this isn't an issue, i think, for something 'twisting in the breeze'; force is needed. it could be an issue if something gets bound up and it is yanked on. or, just a way to get the thing off when you don't need it anymore.

Daryl Daryl
(lyrad1) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest, USA, Earth
Re: Re: cable/zip ties on 04/17/2013 19:55:22 MDT Print View

Tanner,

Good to know. Thanks.