Modifying Osprey Exos
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Christopher Kuzak
(KC)
Modifying Osprey Exos on 01/05/2013 22:52:11 MST Print View

About a year or two ago, I picked up an Exos 58. I really like it a lot, but sometimes wish I'd gone with something a little lighter (the new GG Mariposa and Gorilla look awesome). However, an REI sale and a gift card made the pack too enticing.

I've read a few threads where people discuss modifying the pack. What I'd like to know, is what kind of weight savings people achieved through their modifications? Does everyone feel it was worth the effort? I see dropping the top pocket as the easiest change, but haven't quite mustered up the bravery to start clipping up the pack.

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Probably not worth it on 01/05/2013 23:31:27 MST Print View

The bulk of the pack's weight is in things you can't trim. The body of the pack, the frame, the harness and the hipbelt. The stuff you can trim without compromising the pack is pretty minimal. In my opinion you should not be wacking packets off because they are actually quit useful.

I say enjoy the pack the way it is and if you want to go much lighter then just sell it and buy a lighter pack.

Edit-I have seen some impressive looking numbers. I think someone trimmed a half pound off an REI pack but they were taking off pretty much everything, compression straps, pockets, all of it. Alll that was left was the main pack bag and harness. I seriously question whether that 8 oz of weight saved was worth the hasle of having to constantly take the pack off for water, snacks, cameras etc.

Remember the Osprey was designed to be light and all the little extras like compression straps etc. are probably not adding much weight to the overall pack.

Edited by Cameron on 01/05/2013 23:37:48 MST.

Rick M
(rmjapan) - F

Locale: London, UK
Re: Modifying Osprey Exos on 01/06/2013 00:23:01 MST Print View

I think the biggest weight savings is achieved by removing the top lid (no destructive too) and just using the pack as a rolltop which is pretty much how other UL packs achieve their low weights too.

Harrison Carpenter
(carpenh) - M

Locale: St. Vrain River Valley
Modifications on 01/06/2013 08:20:15 MST Print View

I did some minor modifications to my Goliite Pinnacle-- trimmed excess length off all the straps and hip belt, and cut off the ice axe loops. Not much weight savings, really-- less than 4 oz.

Edited by carpenh on 01/06/2013 08:39:26 MST.

Tim Drescher
(timdcy) - M

Locale: Gore Range
Modifying Osprey Exos on 01/06/2013 08:35:07 MST Print View

I trimmed all of the cinching straps and then sewed the ends. I trimmed most of the waist strap down as that was the longest and I have a pretty slender build anyway.

The trekking pole strap feature (which I found pointless) is completely gone and just about everything else on the outside that doesn't support the actual fit is gone. As some have suggested this doesn't amount to much except for a few ounces.

This spring I'm in the market for a frameless pack especially since my Exos 46 is too big for most of the trips I go on.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Modifying packs on 01/06/2013 13:43:16 MST Print View

I've never been a fan of major modifications in packs. Non destructive changes like leaving the top lid behind when not needed make sense. Trimming excess strap length strikes me like cutting the handle off your toothbrush: it makes a statement, but doesn't do much in reality. When people start cutting major sections out of a pack and doing major sewing on them, I've wondered why bother. If you want a significantly lighter pack, then I would sell the one that you don't like and get a lighter one.

But why have the Exos 58 in the first place? IMHO, 58 liters is a rather large pack and meant for multi-day trips with the bulk of extra food or bear cans (I use an Exos 46). The design is meant for good weight transfer and features that keep your items organized and easily accessed on the trail (read pockets and straps). You are paying in dollars and weight for comfort and convenience. If you are using the capacity, I would guess you need the weight carrying capacity as well. If not, then it's time to shop. When you're done, you might save a pound or a bit more buying a UL back with an internal frame, but it won't have the weight capacity and organization features of the Exos. Just removing the top pocket would get you a step closer and you can add or remove it when it pleases you.