Evernew 900 pot nonstick or plain
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Dennis Park
(dpark) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Evernew 900 pot nonstick or plain on 12/29/2012 16:56:37 MST Print View

I'm looking to get a new pot but am not sure on nonstick or plain. The reviews obviously show that there are fans for both.

Is the weight gain for nonstick worth it?

Perhaps there's someone out there who bought one and decided the other would have been a better choice? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks.

Chad Poindexter
(Stick) - F

Locale: Wet & Humid Southeast....
Depends on your need on 12/29/2012 17:10:40 MST Print View

I actually have both. I initially wanted the nonstick, but at the time, due to the tsunami I had to take what I could get before everything was gone, so I ended up with the nonstick. Then, a few months back I actually won the "UL" version on the Trail Groove site!

As far as the weight savings, it is not much, something like just under an oz, but, a weight savings is a weight savings...

So, what will you be using it for? Just boiling water? I would say go for the "UL" version. If you plan to cook in it, the nonstick version may be a better choice.

Richard Cullip
(RichardCullip)

Locale: San Diego County
Re: Evernew 900 pot nonstick or plain on 12/29/2012 17:43:00 MST Print View

I have both but am now using the 900ml Ultralight Ti (not non-stick) pot because it's lighter than it's non-stick cousin. I originally bought the non-stick version because I thought I would be doing some cooking and simmering on a canister stove. Since then I've gone to an alcohol stove and boiling water (Freezer Bag Cooking) approach so the non-stick (heavier) pot has no advantages for me, just disadvantages. One of these days I might get around to posting it on Gear Swap.

Katy Anderson
(KatyAnderson) - F
My vote is for plain on 12/29/2012 18:49:38 MST Print View

Had a 900 Evernew non-stick pot for several years. Cooked real food in it at times, mostly used a pocket rocket but occasionally cooked over an open fire. Worked great, loved it!

Then I started reading about the possible health risks of the non-stick coating. No problems as long as the non-stick coating has no scratches and you are careful never to overheat the pot. Well, one look at my dented, scratched and torched ti pot made me realize that non-stick coating might not be the best choice for a backpacking pot.

So I replaced it with the plain version of the same pot. Half an ounce lighter, and it cooks just as well.

Rex Sanders
(Rex) - M

Locale: Central California Coast
Re: My vote is for plain on 12/30/2012 00:37:02 MST Print View

The Evernew non-stick coating is "silicon ceramic", and not PTFE (brand name Teflon). The widely reported health concerns are for PTFE; alternative coatings like silicon ceramic were developed because of those concerns.

I can't find the exact coating used by Evernew. One common silicon ceramic coating for cookware is Thermolon. "Thermolon's range of non-stick coatings do not contain any toxic materials or persistent organic pollutants and none are used in their manufacture or application." (reference) "Thermolon has an elemental composition of oxygen (O), silicon (Si), carbon (C), aluminum (Al) and titanium (Ti)." (reference)

That doesn't mean the silicon ceramic coating used by Evernew is safe; but I can't find any verifiable concerns based on Google searches.

Note that silicon (the element) and silicone (the polymer) are not the same, but lots of people confuse them.

I won't use PTFE-coated cookware, but I will continue using my Evernew non-stick 900 ml pot. It's much easier to clean than plain titanium or aluminum, which saves water in dry camps.

(Edited for various typos. It's late here.)

Edited by Rex on 12/30/2012 00:46:44 MST.

Jon Fong
(jonfong57)

Locale: www.flatcatgear.com
Re: Evernew 900 pot nonstick or plain on 12/30/2012 09:32:43 MST Print View

I use the non-stick version. I cook in the pot and I like not having to worry about being gentle with the non-stick coating. I have removed food bits out my pots with sand and gravel (when washed with water of course). Best regards - Jon