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Long sleeve shirt for sun protection
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scott rebello
(scottrebello) - F
Ex Officio on 12/30/2012 21:14:59 MST Print View

Another vote for an Ex O shirt. With a micro wt wool t shirt under. For sun or bugs. 200 G so they arent super light.

peter vacco
(fluff@inreach.com) - M

Locale: no. california
shirt stink on 12/30/2012 21:45:56 MST Print View

since the tahoe rim is high in elevation, and it will probably be nice and dry, you can successfully deploy almost anything. i go with nylon, but have experimented with poly/cotton (as opposed to cotton/poly) and had very decent luck with it.
the cotton will make it sweeter to wear, and feel better under the pack belt.
because of bugs, comfort, and moisture control, no matter how warm, i'd prob layer a thin merino T under it. Minus-33 sells a nice Zip-T in merino. the wool will attend to the stink issue as well as is possible.

just my op.

cheers,
v.

Patrick O'Neil
(human) - F
Re: shirt stink on 12/31/2012 13:12:22 MST Print View

I have an arteryx phase sl long sleeve, probably the only non merino base layer that that I've tried that doesn't reek after a couple of hours (I've never actually tried merino though too expensive), I've worn it for 2-3 days at a time in Ecuador, not overnight hiking but with some day hikes of 3-5 hours. The thing nver stank on me. Another good thing is that the neck actually goes up to your neck.

Anything i've tried from patagonia has a massive neck, even their UV50 stuff which seems to defeat the purpose for me, they stink after an hour sitting around at home and most people I now would say I smell neutral, I don't even really need deodorant if I'm not wearing a suit.

Arcteryx does not have a UV rating and it seems it's made of a mesh, even so I never got burned even in direct sun at the equator. I also wear it for bike rides (up to 100km). One thing to note is that they are slim fitting, I normally go medium sizes (I'm 6'1" 170-175 pounds) but found the medium too revealing around my skinny fat gut. A large doesn't hang off of me. Unless you're comfortable with the stretched feeling on your stomach or you've got a six pack or a very flat stomach go with your regular sizing if not go up, .

It seems the phase sl has been "revised" I guess that's their way of raising the price and now it's about as expensive as merino but it's lighter, more compact, washes in the sink and dries fast (wear it damp and 10 minutes in the sun it will be dry). I have a few "running" long sleeve shirts and 2 or 3 patagonia shirts, I never wear them now. The phase sl is very light and the sleeves seem to be starting to fray a bit and look a little stained but so far no holes (after one season).

I have a skinny neck and wear a junior buff around my neck, along with shades, long pants and a hat I never burn now except for my hands. I burn really easily and I hate applying sunscreen all day so this has become the best solution, although my girlfriend's pretty mortified to be around me in this get up . . .

Wow I really sound like an ad, but for me it works. Sorry for the long winded message.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Options on 12/31/2012 13:23:26 MST Print View

As a Mojave Desert resident I have to wear long sleeved shirts every time I hike/ have one of all the shirts below and 2 wide brimmed hats.


SHIRTS: (all are polyester)
1. REI Sahara
2. Columbia Titanium
3. Cabela's Guidewear

HATS:
1. wide brimmed cotton or polyester (Poly is my choice - lighter, MUCH faster drying)
2. fisherman's lilled hat W/ neck cape

PANTS:
1. REI Sahara (light polyester)
2. .511 tactical pants (heavier nylon)

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
sun shirt on 12/31/2012 18:48:27 MST Print View

I have never found one I like that well. Either it is too expensive, stinks or doesn't breathe well. Usually I just use a very thin poly/cotton light colored dress shirt. Dries somewhat fast, doesn't stink too fast and is inexpensive. A compromise at best.

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
Mosquitos on 12/31/2012 20:51:40 MST Print View

Doesn't appear to be mentioned much in this thread. But, where you'll be there'll be mosquitos and a poly or wool shirt will not provide adequate protection unless you are really early/late in the season. Nylon will work a real treat offering excellent protection from them skeeters. So ExOfficio and REI Sahara shirts work great and I'm sure other in nylon will too. (The REI shirt was stated as poly earlier in the thread, but that is the liner only, not the shirt material) These nylon shirts also breath fairly well too.

Susan Papuga
(veganaloha) - M

Locale: USA
Re: Long sleeve shirt for sun protection on 12/31/2012 23:04:39 MST Print View

Hey Steve,

I'm planning on doing the TRT this summer as well.

My favorite L/S shirt is still the Columbia PFG snap-front shirt. Retail is about $45.00. Our local Sports Authority carries them, you may find them online as well. The snap-front is better than the button-downs for fabric, ventilation and other features.

It has SPF 30, is wind resistant, is light and comfortable against your skin and dries very quickly, is durable and doesn't retain odor either.

Best,

Susan

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
PFG on 12/31/2012 23:52:01 MST Print View

A friend has a shirt like that but I don't think he's worn it in buggy situations. Susan, how is the bug protection of the PFG shirts?

edited to directly address Susan. Thanks Susan.

Edited by WarrenGreer on 01/01/2013 15:08:41 MST.

Bradford Rogers
(Mocs123) - MLife

Locale: Southeast Tennessee
Re: Re: Long sleeve shirt for sun protection on 01/01/2013 12:41:49 MST Print View

Railriders Eco Mesh, Adventure, or Bone Flats shirt. They are all nylon and unlike the ex officieo, their venting works with a pack on. Nylon doesn't stink as bad or as fast as poly, but it still will stink some. Nylon does dry quickly and not only has sun protection but bug protection.

jeffrey armbruster
(book) - M

Locale: Northern California
"Long sleeve shirt for sun protection" on 01/01/2013 15:45:10 MST Print View

I forgot to mention that my Mountain Hardware nylon sun shirt has vents that run under the arms and down the side. This is brilliant if you're wearing a pack--as opposed to back vents. Also, it has a great zip front pocket. And again, skeeterproof! Sorry, I've forgotten the model name.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Thrift store on 01/01/2013 16:35:10 MST Print View

I have all kinds of expensive shirts, most of which have been mentioned. But to be honest a 60/40 cotton dress shirt at your local thrift store works just as well.

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
huh? on 01/01/2013 18:27:56 MST Print View

Just a quick note to all the people pushing the hiking shirts like the RailRiders Exo Mesh. How do you find them breatheable? Yes, there is the venting on the side but I never found that much in the front or back and would sweat a lot in them when the temp was above 90F, I did any exertion and there was no breeze blowing on my side. I found more breatheablitiy in the really thin dress shirts, those seemed to breathe all around and a breeze at any angle would help to cool me down.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: huh? on 01/01/2013 18:49:01 MST Print View

Brett, if you are naked you will sweat at 90 F.

Susan Papuga
(veganaloha) - M

Locale: USA
Re: PFG on 01/02/2013 02:54:53 MST Print View

Warren,

I haven't been noticably bitten through these shirts despite them not having any bug chemicals applied to the fabric. I suppose a really big cloud of determined mozzies, black flies, chiggers, noseeums, etc could get you through it, but I'm not sure of any breathable shirt that offers complete bug protection.

For me, I can use DEET or whatever for the occassions when bugs are out. Personally, I probably wouldn't want bug stuff in my clothes, as I choose my shirt based on other attributes like sun protection, lightweight, breathable, quick drying, comfort, etc. I've been happy with the PFGs when I want a L/S shirt. Like I said, they are also pretty wind resistant despite the light fabric and back vents. They hold up well and come clean pretty easy by hand-washing.

Hope this helps.

Susan

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
Rail Riders on 01/02/2013 11:23:10 MST Print View

I guess I'll +27 the RailRiders, particularly the EcoMesh shirts. I have come to fight the UL tide regarding just wearing your base layer top as a shirt. I detest slathering anything greasy on my skin so I avoid sunscreen and bug dope. Thus I am a firm long-pants (not shorts) and long-sleeves (not baselayer T-shirt) hiker in almost ANY conditions I can think of. I just did a hike in the Grand Canyon this spring and the long-sleeved baselayer didn't really work for me, even with some of the thinnest wool I could find. First, it's hot, but actually that's not TOO terrible. But also I was exposing a relatively expensive wool shirt to snags and scrapes, so I had to be careful about tearing it or wearing holes in it. Kind of a pain.

I have since discovered the RailRiders Ecomesh pants and shirts, and I love them. For summer hiking here in the mountain west you rarely need your baselayer for most daylight walks- I seem to worry about overheating in the sun far more often than getting cold. And they can be bought with InsectShield(tm), which I presume is some sort of Permethrin treatment.

And, heck, if it does get cold you can always add that baselayer shirt under the RailRiders nylon top.

Bradford Rogers
(Mocs123) - MLife

Locale: Southeast Tennessee
Re: huh? on 01/02/2013 12:13:06 MST Print View

Brett,

You may be refering to this but RR and similar shirts are mainly for sun protection and are not intended for hiking below tree line. I would never wear one in the hot and humid SE where I live, but they worked great on the JMT and Wind River the past two years. I would not recomend one for the midwest, southeast, northeast, or even the northwest. They are great in hot, arid/semi arid conditions in the Sierras and Rockies and any time sun protection is top priority. Rail Riders shirts were originally for sailing, and saltwater fly fishing. The Eco Mesh shirt was designed for a ultra marathon in the sahara desert.

Brad Fisher
(wufpackfn)

Locale: NC/TN/VA Mountains
Re: Re: huh? on 01/02/2013 12:20:16 MST Print View

+1 Arcteryx Motus LS

Wore one on the JMT for a week last year without any stink.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Rail Riders on 01/02/2013 12:56:13 MST Print View

I wear both Eco-Mesh pants and shirts on a lot of my trips. Even in triple digit heat if I expect cold at higher elevations. Both are among my favorite pieces of gear. But they are not cheap.

For most people a thin 640/40 cotton/poly blend dress shirt will be just fine. I hiked in these for decades.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: huh? on 01/02/2013 17:47:41 MST Print View

"+1 Arcteryx Motus LS"

+ another 1. I've been using one the past 2 seasons in the Sierra with great results. It has a UPF rating of something like 53, weighs ~4 oz in a size S, and breathes superbly. I can't comment on the stink factor, since I don't. ;0)

Edited for content.

Edited by ouzel on 01/02/2013 17:49:06 MST.

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
clarification and thanks on 01/02/2013 18:16:06 MST Print View

'Brett, if you are naked you will sweat at 90 F.'

I usually don't if I am just standing around in the shade. With most hiking shirts I do. Yes, nylon doesn't stink but it doesn't breathe that well either. I think my First Ascent windshirt unzipped about half way down breathes just about as much.

'Brett, You may be refering to this but RR and similar shirts are mainly for sun protection and are not intended for hiking below tree line. I would never wear one in the hot and humid SE where I live, but they worked great on the JMT and Wind River the past two years. I would not recomend one for the midwest, southeast, northeast, or even the northwest. They are great in hot, arid/semi arid conditions in the Sierras and Rockies and any time sun protection is top priority. Rail Riders shirts were originally for sailing, and saltwater fly fishing. The Eco Mesh shirt was designed for a ultra marathon in the sahara desert.'

Okay, I can see that and I acknowledge that it applies to the original poster. I still think you would bake in them even in arid conditions in an EcoMesh, that is why I sold mine. I wish I knew it was just for above tree line before I bought it but no one said squat when I asked, like three times. I think everyone one here lives around mountains. To get above the treeline where I live I would have to drive more than 12 hours.