A New Point & Shoot...
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J H L
(jake.L) - F

Locale: Katahdin
A New Point & Shoot... on 12/19/2012 12:52:21 MST Print View

I've been using an old Nikon Coolpix L22 with "OK" results and it has come time for an upgrade. My needs are simple. I want to stick with the simplicity of a P&S, take higher quality pictures in varying light and have a wide angle lense for landscapes. After searching the forum it seems like the Canon S100 is a VERY popular choice. I like that it has a lot of manual adjustability but have very little experience with doing so (might be nice down the road). Does this camera have a basic automatic mode that will cover most instances without having to fool around with the settings very much? I'm might also consider the previous Canon models S90 or S95 if these are more suitable for the amateur photographer. Thanks for everyones help in advance!

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: A New Point & Shoot... on 12/19/2012 13:36:23 MST Print View

The Canon User Interface is highly respected in the industry, and afaik all the reasonable Canon cameras have two 'automatic' settings. One is 'Auto', and that is totally automatic, while the other is P(rogram), which is automatic as well except that it will not turn the flash on automatically. Me, I never use Auto; I mostly use P.
But most Canon cameras have several other useful modes as well.

Cheers
(I can recommend the G11/G12.)

James Arzigian
(Renais) - M
SX130 on 12/19/2012 14:01:37 MST Print View

We've used several Canon cameras powered by AA batteries, and been quite pleased both with the picture quality, and the fact that it is easy to change batteries, and spares match what is used for the rest of equipment. I am currently using an SX130, and I believe there is another SX camera just released. I get around 270 photos with a set of alkaline AAs, and more than that with NiMH batteries. The Canon cameras take a fair bit of abuse, and do not seem to mind it.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: A New Point & Shoot... on 12/19/2012 14:02:18 MST Print View

"But most Canon cameras have several other useful modes as well."

Agreed, Roger, but to use those other modes it requires the user to actually read and try to understand the owner's manual.

I have about 10,000 clicks on one camera, and probably 9,800 of those used P mode. Av mode is good if you are trying to do HDR. Tv mode is good if you are trying to shoot birds in flight.

--B.G.--

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: A New Point & Shoot... on 12/19/2012 14:51:03 MST Print View

The S-series has a good reputation for advanced compacts and yes, give a tremendous amount of user control, albeit a lot of it buried in the menu system. It does have the traditional "PASM" dial, even if Canon insists on replacing S with T. (You'll have to ask them.) Set to full automatic I'm confident it will give good results while you're poring through the manual. When you're feeling daring, you can switch from jpeg to RAW to get best results.

Biggest shortcomings are no flash hotshoe and terrible battery life--plan on carrying spares. Otherwise, a competent little camera in a category that used to be pretty spare but is now packed with contenders.

Cheers,

Rick

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
A New Point & Shoot on 12/19/2012 16:17:21 MST Print View

"even if Canon insists on replacing S with T"
Because on their patented exposure dial Canon opted for Av (aperture value) and Tv (Time value) easier/shorter than Shutter Speed value.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: A New Point & Shoot on 12/19/2012 16:23:38 MST Print View

" "even if Canon insists on replacing S with T"
Because on their patented exposure dial Canon opted for Av (aperture value) and Tv (Time value) easier/shorter than Shutter Speed value."

I wonder how they will try to manage this in a cell phone camera (which does not have a real aperture). Come to think of it, it doesn't have a real shutter, either.

--B.G.--

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: A New Point & Shoot on 12/19/2012 18:50:21 MST Print View

Clever scamps! Similar to the last Toyota I drove, with the accelerator pedal on the left. "We're so going to patent this."

Cheers,

Rick

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
re: A New Point & Shoot... on 12/19/2012 18:56:58 MST Print View

Whew! I was afraid this was another gun thread....until I saw it was in Photography!

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: A New Point & Shoot... on 12/19/2012 19:23:33 MST Print View

Bob wrote

> I have about 10,000 clicks on one camera, and probably 9,800 of those used P mode.
Out in the field I would be generally similar, plus or minus a bit.
At home taking techie photos on a tripod for articles I am writing - then I use the features quite a lot.

Cheers

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
A New Point & Shoot on 12/19/2012 20:50:56 MST Print View

I wonder how they will try to manage this in a cell phone camera (which does not have a real aperture).
I am pretty sure that every camera , in a phone or otherwise, does have at least one real aperture..

Maybe not all that clear to some, so here we go...
If a lens has a set of available apertures then you can have an aperture priority mode, called Av by Canon.
So let's say you have F2.8/3.5/5.6 and F 8, well you choose the one you like and the camera will set the corresponding shutter speed.
Obviously if your lens only has one aperture (as it is the case for most phones and gadgets) you cannot have an "aperture priority" because there is no choice to be made...
mind you , Canon does not sell phones.

Edited by Franco on 12/19/2012 21:06:41 MST.

J H L
(jake.L) - F

Locale: Katahdin
Re: A New Point & Shoot on 12/20/2012 12:02:37 MST Print View

Roger, you also recommended the G11/G12. They are very nice but are a bit larger and more $ than I wanted to spend, $400ish.

Rick, you mentioned the terrible battery life of the S100. What can one expect with the GPS turned off/on?

How does the S95 compare with the S100?

Thanks again.

Edited by jake.L on 12/20/2012 12:03:42 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: A New Point & Shoot on 12/20/2012 13:24:08 MST Print View

Hi Jake

Yes, the G series is dearer. But a little secret for you: afaik the S series is the P&S version of the G series. I am not sure of the exact numbers, but I think the S95 may be the P&S version of the G10, and the S100 matches the G11 - or something like that.

The point is, photographically they are essentially the same quality, but the S series is cheaper and simpler to use.

Cheers

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: A New Point & Shoot on 12/20/2012 18:46:11 MST Print View

Hi Jake,

They both have a CIPA rating of 200 shots. DPR had this to say about the 95:

"Canon quotes a battery life of approximately 200 images per charge, but in our experience this represents the outer limit of the tiny 3.7Wh battery's abilities. In normal use we can squeeze between 150-200 images from the S95 before it gives up the ghost, which puts the camera firmly in the 'spare battery essential' category."

You can certainly fiddle with settings to coax the most life out of battery, but in my experience with various cameras, only by a +/- 10-20% factor. A number of advanced compacts will get twice this or more, but a couple spares are easy to carry so no big deal. It's a pain to have one go out when shooting on the go, however.

Cheers,

Rick

Alex H
(abhitt) - MLife

Locale: southern appalachians or desert SW
Re: Re: A New Point & Shoot on 12/20/2012 20:31:02 MST Print View

I have been using an s90 for several years, just got back from a trip and got 280 shots on one battery. I do carry a spare battery if needed. I also just bought a s100 and it looks to be a nice improvement over the 90 and 95. Not sure the 110 is enough of an improvement to warrant the higher price.