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Equipment to breath warm air at night.
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Kevin Burton
(burtonator) - F

Locale: norcal
Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/04/2012 14:39:35 MST Print View

I'm going to be getting into winter backpacking.

However, the one thing that seems to really keep me up, even in summer, is breathing extremely cold air.

It just bothers me and keeps waking me up.

I was thinking that one way around this could be to suspend a small 2x4 foot down blanket over my head while I sleep.

it would be about 6' above my head and help trap warm air near my body.

Many sleeping bags do something similar by having a hood that you can use to wrap your entire head.

Has anyone experimented with this?

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
baclava on 12/04/2012 14:53:48 MST Print View

baclava

Kevin Burton
(burtonator) - F

Locale: norcal
balaclava on 12/04/2012 15:02:22 MST Print View

balaclava isn't really an option for me as it really messes up my face/hair...

it's literally painful if I wear one overnight.

Stephan Doyle
(StephanCal)
Re: Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/04/2012 15:21:22 MST Print View

John Abela of HikeLighter.com was loving some face mask thing that basically did what you're looking for. He was super satisfied with it, made his best gear of 2011 (?) list.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/04/2012 15:43:25 MST Print View

John Abela of HikeLighter.com was loving some face mask thing

I believe this is what that was

Same company has other products that are not full balaclava ... find them suggested at the bottom of the page linked above.

I've tried the PSolar face mask a couple years ago. It is pretty effective but kind of tight and uncomfortably hard in the nose/mouth area for all day wer or sleeping. I avoided PSolar's balaclava version after someone opined that they run small.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/04/2012 15:50:11 MST Print View

Buff?

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Buff on 12/04/2012 16:02:45 MST Print View

+1 for the Buff!

I do it all the time in cooler to cold weather.

My merino wool Buff is 36" long. I can twist and double over one end to make a "watchcap" of sorts and pull the rest of the length down over my face.

It keeps my nose, mouth, face and ears warm. Some would say that it also improves the inherent beauty of the surrounding forest. L O L

Party On,

Newton

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Bug Net on 12/04/2012 16:09:40 MST Print View

I have found that sleeping with a bug net suspended around the top of my bag/quilt can help with the temperature of the air I breath and it doesn't contribute to the amount of moisture/ice near my face or restrict air flow that much as other options can do.

My prefered bug net is an SMD Metero Bivy, but other options would work, any bivy with bug net.
I haven't tried it, but the Equinox Mantis seems like a good light cheap option.

This concept may not be warm enough for your goal, but it does help and may be one of your only options if you can't stand anything on your face.

I personally can't sleep with anything covering my nose or mouth restricting air flow.

Edited by brooklynkayak on 12/05/2012 17:37:28 MST.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
"Luke, I am your father" on 12/04/2012 16:15:17 MST Print View

Cold Avenger Pro mask

Cold Avenger Pro mask

Party On,

Newton

Greg Foster
(thefost) - MLife
ColdAvenger on 12/05/2012 13:21:33 MST Print View

Wouldn't sleeping with the coldavenger cause water to accumulate and drip out of the mouthpiece and into your sleeping bag? Maybe someone who has slept with one on can clarify.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: ColdAvenger on 12/05/2012 13:43:42 MST Print View

My post on the Buff was in agreement with Ken and meant as a helpful suggestion.

My other post with the picture of the Cold Avenger was a feeble attempt at humor. Hence the title of the post, "Luke, I am your father."

I have no experience with the Cold Avenger Pro mask what-so-ever.

I apologize for any mis-direction or confusion that I may have introduced into this thread.

Party On,

Newton

Randy Martin
(randalmartin) - F

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: Buff on 12/05/2012 14:36:41 MST Print View

Another +1 for the Buff. I even use it in shoulder seasons. It also has the additional benefit of humidifying the air you breath which for me is just as important as warming the air.

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: ColdAvenger on 12/05/2012 14:48:10 MST Print View

Newton, I got the humor and appreciated it, I don't think you need to apologize, maybe you should have up'd the ante with something even better (though that was pretty good).
Tad

Stephen Komae
(skomae) - MLife

Locale: northeastern US
Re: ColdAvenger on 12/05/2012 17:29:20 MST Print View

I use the ColdAvenger when it's really cold.

Yes, it can cause some moisture to land on your bag. It also has air holes on the bottom, and channels air downwards. I use a down bag in the winter and have not had issues with losing loft, although the bag surface is a bit moist in the morning.

Barry P
(BarryP) - F

Locale: Eastern Idaho (moved from Midwest)
Re: Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/05/2012 17:49:30 MST Print View

I carry some type of small pack towel with me at all times. It’s usually on the back of my backpack soaking up back sweat. But at night (below 30F) I just plop it over my face. I do wear a hat and very light balaclava but I use the towel to cover my nose and mouth. My hat covers my eyes.

In the morning, the towel is usually wet and even frosted over, but my face stays warm all night. And the towel prevents breath getting into my quilt.

Feels good to post again.

-Barry
-The mountains were made for Teva’s

Jessica Rankin
(JessiD87)
Re: Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/05/2012 20:31:21 MST Print View

+1 on a Buff. I have multiple and use them for everything. Just don't get it wet or it smells like a wet dog.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Equipment to breath warm air at night. on 12/05/2012 21:16:16 MST Print View

2/3's of a buff for me. I didn't like the original length so cut it to about 12 inches. I use it with a mountain hardwear beanie.