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Rolling the edge (lip) of a beer can pot
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Colin Krusor
(ckrusor) - M

Locale: Northwest US
Rolling the edge (lip) of a beer can pot on 12/03/2012 19:41:08 MST Print View

I'd like to use a 2-3 liter Kirin or Asahi beer can to make an aluminum pot, but this is only feasible if I can roll the cut edge. I know that heating the edge with a propane flame will soften the aluminum and make it less prone to cracking, but I don't know how to proceed from there.

Can this be done without a custom-machined die? Does anyone have experience rolling the edges of cut-down Fosters or Heineken pots?

Any tips are appreciated.

George Geist
(geist) - M

Locale: Smoky Mountains
Re: Rolling the edge (lip) of a beer can pot on 12/05/2012 15:10:26 MST Print View

Hi Colin,

No need to roll the edge, just get a Good Cook SafecutĀ® Can Opener
and it will open the beer can leaving no sharp lip.
They can be found in many grocery stores for about $13, or Google it to order online.

Colin Krusor
(ckrusor) - M

Locale: Northwest US
Can edge on 12/05/2012 21:40:52 MST Print View

George, thanks for the tip. I'm familiar with that method, actually. I don't want a 2-3 L pot, though. The japanese beer cans I'm referring to are gigantic, and I want to cut one down to obtain a roughly 4-5" wide 1-1.5 L pot. So, I need to do something to smooth and reinforce the cut edge. I just bought a couple of these cans on ebay:

kirin

asahi

Jordo _99
(jordo_99) - MLife

Locale: Nebraska
Seen something similar on Instructables once on 12/06/2012 12:43:50 MST Print View

Edit, I couldn't find it...It was specifically referring how one can add ridges/waves in the can to strengthen it and not the lip though.

Edited by jordo_99 on 12/06/2012 13:01:37 MST.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Instructables on 12/06/2012 16:28:43 MST Print View

Jordo,

http://www.instructables.com/id/Aluminum-Bottle-Tumbler-Cup-Cook-Pot/?ALLSTEPS

Click on "Jump To" and then on the 1 thru 10 numbered steps.

You can also click the right arrow on the "Jump To" button and see all 10 steps as you scroll down the page.

Party On,

Newton

Ozzy McKinney
(PorcupinePhobia) - F

Locale: PNW
sweet! on 12/06/2012 17:01:36 MST Print View

Nice link. I knew I would find a way to kill time over winter break!

Jon Fong
(jonfong57)

Locale: www.flatcatgear.com
Re: Re: Instructables on 12/06/2012 17:23:40 MST Print View

Newton,

That technique works well with the "thick" walled aluminum bottles. I do not believe that it will work the same way with a "thin" beer can like the heineken can. I have seen somewhere where you might be able to do this by first annealing the edge that you want to fold over. Best Wishes - Jon

Colin Krusor
(ckrusor) - M

Locale: Northwest US
Rolling edge of aluminum can on 12/07/2012 11:37:57 MST Print View

John and Jon, thanks for the tips. I agree that the instructables method might not work with a thin walled beer can. In my experiments with soda cans, I found that the biggest problem is cracking of the edge when the can flexes. Maybe a cylindrical wooden block inside the can might help, by keeping it from flexing. The thin-walled cans just might not have enough material in the wall to stretch when rolling over the edge, though.

I also considered making a composite lip by putting a 3/8" wide strip of epoxy-saturated carbon fiber tape over the edge. It would be heavier than a rolled aluminum edge, I would guess. I would airbrush a thin layer of food-grade silicone sealant over it.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Rolling the edge (lip) of a beer can pot on 12/07/2012 16:53:09 MST Print View

Even if we could roll the top edge the large diameter of the can is going to be a determining factor of how strong it turns out. I speculate it will be very flimsy. I think it would need quite a few ridge lines around the body of the stove such as the ones on a foster ridgeline pot.

Heating the aluminum is just going to weaken it.

Is that beer available in the USA?

Send me a can to experiment on or let me know when you see one on ebay.

Edited by zelph on 12/07/2012 16:55:11 MST.

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Adding post to: "Rolling the edge (lip) of a beer can pot" on 12/07/2012 20:46:16 MST Print View

See if you can find another can to make a ring.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Adding post to: "Rolling the edge (lip) of a beer can pot" on 12/08/2012 16:44:10 MST Print View

If you decide to go the route as suggested by Michael Ray keep in mind what everyone at one time were concerned with. The Walmart grease pot had an inward rolled lip that would possibly grow some bacteria. There will be a lip on the inside of your can with that method.

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: bacteria on 12/08/2012 17:10:54 MST Print View

Would that really be a concern when you're only boiling water? Each boiling cycle should kill off anything that may be present anyway I'd think.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: Re: bacteria on 12/08/2012 21:25:51 MST Print View

It was just a reminder of the concerns about the walmart grease pot with the rolled inward lip. Overhanging lips collect stuff. Airborne bacteria are all around us. They like warmth, moisture and dark places.

Ozzy McKinney
(PorcupinePhobia) - F

Locale: PNW
micro on 12/09/2012 12:02:32 MST Print View

an inward rolled lip? As in, toward the interior of the pot? Strange.

If you were just boiling water, I doubt a lip on the interior would grow much, due to a lack of medium. It's been a while since I took microbiology, but if any food got stuck on the interior you could definitely grow some undesirables. The food could act as a source of nutrition and as a protective barrier, and some types of gram-negative baddies can withstand boiling temps for up to ten minutes IIRC. When is the last time you boiled water for 10 minutes with an alcohol stove?

Anyway, thread drift.

Kevin Beeden
(captain_paranoia) - F

Locale: UK
re: bacterial growth on 12/10/2012 11:53:33 MST Print View

Whilst the water may not reach more than 100C, the upper part of a pan might, since, if the water doesn't come up to the brim to cool it, the hot gases flowing up the side of the pan can get it quite hot. I wouldn't like to guess how hot; an IR thermometer would be the best bet.

I seem to remember measuring the exhaust gases from a clone as being about 200C (using an electronic meat thermometer.

Dan Yeruski
(zelph) - MLife

Locale: www.bplite.com
Re: re: bacterial growth on 12/10/2012 21:46:03 MST Print View

Here is the link Kevin see what you think of it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cU77XQpjrdI

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: Bacteria and Rolling the lip of a beer can pot on 01/02/2013 17:16:54 MST Print View

Michael Ray suggested using another can as a source for a reinforcement ring in a Fosters type beer can pot.

Dan reminded us that there would be a chance of that method leaving a space for bacteria to grow and hide.

From a MYOG standpoint I would suggest using a food grade sealant applied to the ring and the inside edge of the can to "seal" out the little bugs from setting up housekeeping.

Food Grade Sealant

Mind you there could still be a "rough" edge where the ring ends and the sealant is at its thinnest.

FWIW Unless you are completely set up to add ridges to your can and are determined to install a MYOG reinforcing ring I think Dan has the best deal going on the Fosters type beer can pots.

http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/foster-2-cup-flat-bottom.php

Zelph's Fosters Pot

As much as I like making my own gear, sometimes it just doesn't pay to tool up for a single item like a beer can cook pot.

I did soothe my MYOG ego a bit by adding my own SS wire bail to my Fosters pot that I got from Zelph's.

2 Cup Fosters pot with bail

IMHO 1 Foster can, 1 aluminum lid, 2 plastic covers and 1 FREE Generic 1 cup capacity Ridged Flat bottom aluminum can for $17.00 + $3.00 shipping is well worth the money spent. It may also save some fingers from "sheet metal distress". ;-)

Party On,

Newton